The Mystical Element of Religion, as studied in Saint Catherine of Genoa and her friends, Volume 1 (of 2)
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The Mystical Element of Religion, as studied in Saint Catherine of Genoa and her friends, Volume 1 (of 2)

By Baron Friedrich von Hügel
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Book Description
Table of Contents
  • PREFACE
    • CONTENTS OF THE FIRST VOLUME
  • THE MYSTICAL ELEMENT OF RELIGION
    • PART I INTRODUCTION
      • CHAPTER I THE THREE CHIEF FORCES OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION
        • Introductory.
        • I. The First of the Three Forces: Hellenism, the Thirst for Richness and Harmony.
        • II. The Second of the Three Forces: Christianity, the Revelation of Personality and Depth.
        • III. Science: the Apprehension and Conception Of Brute Fact and Iron Law.
        • IV. Summing up: Hellenism or Harmonization, Christianity or Spiritual Experience, and Science or Acceptance of a Preliminary Mechanism, all three necessary to Man.
      • Introductory.
      • I. The First of the Three Forces: Hellenism, the Thirst for Richness and Harmony.
      • II. The Second of the Three Forces: Christianity, the Revelation of Personality and Depth.
      • III. Science: the Apprehension and Conception Of Brute Fact and Iron Law.
      • IV. Summing up: Hellenism or Harmonization, Christianity or Spiritual Experience, and Science or Acceptance of a Preliminary Mechanism, all three necessary to Man.
      • CHAPTER II THE THREE ELEMENTS OF RELIGION
        • Introductory.
        • I. The Three Elements, as they successively appear in the Child, the Youth, and the Adult Man.
        • II. Each Element ever accompanied by some amount of the other two. Difficulty of the Transitions from one stage to the other.
        • III. Parallels to this Triad of Religious Elements.
        • IV. Distribution of the Three Elements amongst Mankind and throughout Human History.
        • V. Causes operative in all Religion towards Minimizing or Suppressing one or other Element, or towards denying the need of any Multiplicity.
        • VI. The Special Motives operating in each Element towards the Suppression of the other Elements.
        • VII. Three Final Objections to such a conception of Religion, and their Answers.
      • Introductory.
      • I. The Three Elements, as they successively appear in the Child, the Youth, and the Adult Man.
      • II. Each Element ever accompanied by some amount of the other two. Difficulty of the Transitions from one stage to the other.
      • III. Parallels to this Triad of Religious Elements.
      • IV. Distribution of the Three Elements amongst Mankind and throughout Human History.
      • V. Causes operative in all Religion towards Minimizing or Suppressing one or other Element, or towards denying the need of any Multiplicity.
      • VI. The Special Motives operating in each Element towards the Suppression of the other Elements.
      • VII. Three Final Objections to such a conception of Religion, and their Answers.
    • CHAPTER I THE THREE CHIEF FORCES OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION
      • Introductory.
      • I. The First of the Three Forces: Hellenism, the Thirst for Richness and Harmony.
      • II. The Second of the Three Forces: Christianity, the Revelation of Personality and Depth.
      • III. Science: the Apprehension and Conception Of Brute Fact and Iron Law.
      • IV. Summing up: Hellenism or Harmonization, Christianity or Spiritual Experience, and Science or Acceptance of a Preliminary Mechanism, all three necessary to Man.
    • Introductory.
    • I. The First of the Three Forces: Hellenism, the Thirst for Richness and Harmony.
    • II. The Second of the Three Forces: Christianity, the Revelation of Personality and Depth.
    • III. Science: the Apprehension and Conception Of Brute Fact and Iron Law.
    • IV. Summing up: Hellenism or Harmonization, Christianity or Spiritual Experience, and Science or Acceptance of a Preliminary Mechanism, all three necessary to Man.
    • CHAPTER II THE THREE ELEMENTS OF RELIGION
      • Introductory.
      • I. The Three Elements, as they successively appear in the Child, the Youth, and the Adult Man.
      • II. Each Element ever accompanied by some amount of the other two. Difficulty of the Transitions from one stage to the other.
      • III. Parallels to this Triad of Religious Elements.
      • IV. Distribution of the Three Elements amongst Mankind and throughout Human History.
      • V. Causes operative in all Religion towards Minimizing or Suppressing one or other Element, or towards denying the need of any Multiplicity.
      • VI. The Special Motives operating in each Element towards the Suppression of the other Elements.
      • VII. Three Final Objections to such a conception of Religion, and their Answers.
    • Introductory.
    • I. The Three Elements, as they successively appear in the Child, the Youth, and the Adult Man.
    • II. Each Element ever accompanied by some amount of the other two. Difficulty of the Transitions from one stage to the other.
    • III. Parallels to this Triad of Religious Elements.
    • IV. Distribution of the Three Elements amongst Mankind and throughout Human History.
    • V. Causes operative in all Religion towards Minimizing or Suppressing one or other Element, or towards denying the need of any Multiplicity.
    • VI. The Special Motives operating in each Element towards the Suppression of the other Elements.
    • VII. Three Final Objections to such a conception of Religion, and their Answers.
    • PART II BIOGRAPHICAL
      • CHAPTER III CATHERINE FIESCA ADORNA’S LIFE, UP TO HER CONVERSION; AND THE CHIEF PECULIARITIES PREDOMINANT THROUGHOUT HER CONVERT YEARS
        • Introductory.
        • I. Proposed Study of the Mystical-Volitional Element in a Particular, Concrete Instance: St. Catherine of Genoa.
        • II. The Materials and Aids towards such a Study.
        • III. Peculiarities of the Genoese Climate And Geographical Position; of the Ligurian Character; and of the Times into which Catherine was born. Her Family, Father and Mother.
        • IV. Catherine’s Life, up to the Preliminaries of her Conversion: Autumn 1447-Mid-March 1474.
        • V. Her Conversion, with its immediate Preliminaries and Consequences, March 1474.
        • VI. The Two Conceptions concerning the Character and Rationale of her Penitential Period and of her whole Convert Life. The Position adopted here.
        • VII. Catherine and the Holy Eucharist.
        • VIII. Catherine and Confession and Direction.
        • IX. Catherine and Indulgences.
        • X. Peculiarities concerning the Invocation of Saints and Intercessory Prayer.
      • Introductory.
      • I. Proposed Study of the Mystical-Volitional Element in a Particular, Concrete Instance: St. Catherine of Genoa.
      • II. The Materials and Aids towards such a Study.
      • III. Peculiarities of the Genoese Climate And Geographical Position; of the Ligurian Character; and of the Times into which Catherine was born. Her Family, Father and Mother.
      • IV. Catherine’s Life, up to the Preliminaries of her Conversion: Autumn 1447-Mid-March 1474.
      • V. Her Conversion, with its immediate Preliminaries and Consequences, March 1474.
      • VI. The Two Conceptions concerning the Character and Rationale of her Penitential Period and of her whole Convert Life. The Position adopted here.
      • VII. Catherine and the Holy Eucharist.
      • VIII. Catherine and Confession and Direction.
      • IX. Catherine and Indulgences.
      • X. Peculiarities concerning the Invocation of Saints and Intercessory Prayer.
      • CHAPTER IV CATHERINE’S LIFE FROM 1473 TO 1506 AND ITS MAIN CHANGES AND GROWTH
        • I. First Period of Catherine’s Convert Life: Giuliano’s Bankruptcy and Conversion; their Work among the Poor, March 1473 to May 1477.
        • II. Catherine and Tommasa Fiesca: their Difference of Character and attrait. Peculiarity of Catherine’s Penitence and Health during this time.
        • III. Change in the Temper of Catherine’s Penitence, from May 1474 onwards.
        • IV. Catherine’s Great Fasts.
        • V. Second, Central Period of Catherine’s Convert Life, 1477-1499: its Special Spiritual Features.
        • VI. Catherine and Giuliano move into the Hospital in 1479, never again to quit it. She is Matron from 1490 to 1495.
        • VII. Catherine and the Plague. The Outbreak of 1493.
        • VIII. Catherine and Ettore Vernazza, 1493-1495.
        • IX. Catherine’s Health breaks down, 1496; other Events of the Same Year.
        • X. Events of 1497.
        • XI. Beginning of her Third, Last Period; End of the Extraordinary Fasts; First Relations with Don Marabotto.
        • XII. Her Conversations with her Disciples; “Caterina Serafina.” Don Marabotto and the Possessed Maid.
        • XIII. Catherine’s Sympathy with Animal- and Plant-Life: her Love of the Open Air. Her Deep Self-knowledge as to the Healthiness or Morbidness of her Psycho-Physical States.
        • XIV. Catherine’s Social Joys and Sorrows, 1501-1507.
      • I. First Period of Catherine’s Convert Life: Giuliano’s Bankruptcy and Conversion; their Work among the Poor, March 1473 to May 1477.
      • II. Catherine and Tommasa Fiesca: their Difference of Character and attrait. Peculiarity of Catherine’s Penitence and Health during this time.
      • III. Change in the Temper of Catherine’s Penitence, from May 1474 onwards.
      • IV. Catherine’s Great Fasts.
      • V. Second, Central Period of Catherine’s Convert Life, 1477-1499: its Special Spiritual Features.
      • VI. Catherine and Giuliano move into the Hospital in 1479, never again to quit it. She is Matron from 1490 to 1495.
      • VII. Catherine and the Plague. The Outbreak of 1493.
      • VIII. Catherine and Ettore Vernazza, 1493-1495.
      • IX. Catherine’s Health breaks down, 1496; other Events of the Same Year.
      • X. Events of 1497.
      • XI. Beginning of her Third, Last Period; End of the Extraordinary Fasts; First Relations with Don Marabotto.
      • XII. Her Conversations with her Disciples; “Caterina Serafina.” Don Marabotto and the Possessed Maid.
      • XIII. Catherine’s Sympathy with Animal- and Plant-Life: her Love of the Open Air. Her Deep Self-knowledge as to the Healthiness or Morbidness of her Psycho-Physical States.
      • XIV. Catherine’s Social Joys and Sorrows, 1501-1507.
      • CHAPTER V CATHERINE’S LAST FOUR YEARS, 1506 TO 1510—SKETCH OF HER CHARACTER, DOCTRINE, AND SPIRIT
        • I. Catherine’s External Interests and Activities up to May 1510. Occasional Slight Deviations from her Old Balance. Immensely Close Interconnection of her whole Mental and Psycho-Physical Nature. Impressions as connected with the Five Senses.
        • II. More or Less Maladif Experiences and Actions.
        • III. Catherine’s History from May to September 9, 1510.
        • IV. The Last Six Days of Catherine’s Life, September 10-15.
        • V. Sketch of Catherine’s Spiritual Character and Significance.
      • I. Catherine’s External Interests and Activities up to May 1510. Occasional Slight Deviations from her Old Balance. Immensely Close Interconnection of her whole Mental and Psycho-Physical Nature. Impressions as connected with the Five Senses.
      • II. More or Less Maladif Experiences and Actions.
      • III. Catherine’s History from May to September 9, 1510.
      • IV. The Last Six Days of Catherine’s Life, September 10-15.
      • V. Sketch of Catherine’s Spiritual Character and Significance.
      • CHAPTER VI CATHERINE’S DOCTRINE
        • I. God as Creative Love. The Creature’s True and False Self; True and False Love.
        • II. Sin, Purification, Illumination.
        • III. The Three Categories and the Two Ways.
        • IV. The Other Worlds.
      • I. God as Creative Love. The Creature’s True and False Self; True and False Love.
      • II. Sin, Purification, Illumination.
      • III. The Three Categories and the Two Ways.
      • IV. The Other Worlds.
      • CHAPTER VII CATHERINE’S REMAINS AND CULTUS; THE FATE OF HER TWO PRIEST FRIENDS AND OF HER DOMESTICS; AND THE REMAINING HISTORY OF ETTORE VERNAZZA
        • Introductory.
        • I. The Burial and the Events immediately surrounding it. September 15 to December 10, 1510.
        • II. The Different Removals of the Remains, and the Chief Stages of her Official Cultus.
        • III. The Fate of Catherine’s Priest Friends.
        • IV. The Fate of Catherine’s Three Maid-Servants.
        • V. The Two Vernazzas: their Debt to Catherine, and Catherine’s Debt to them.
        • VI. Ettore Vernazza’s Life, from 1509 to 1512.
        • VII. Ettore in Rome and Naples; his Second Will; his Work in the Genoese Prisons.
        • VIII. Ettore again in Naples; his Death in Genoa; Peculiarities of his Posthumous Fame.
      • Introductory.
      • I. The Burial and the Events immediately surrounding it. September 15 to December 10, 1510.
      • II. The Different Removals of the Remains, and the Chief Stages of her Official Cultus.
      • III. The Fate of Catherine’s Priest Friends.
      • IV. The Fate of Catherine’s Three Maid-Servants.
      • V. The Two Vernazzas: their Debt to Catherine, and Catherine’s Debt to them.
      • VI. Ettore Vernazza’s Life, from 1509 to 1512.
      • VII. Ettore in Rome and Naples; his Second Will; his Work in the Genoese Prisons.
      • VIII. Ettore again in Naples; his Death in Genoa; Peculiarities of his Posthumous Fame.
      • CHAPTER VIII BATTISTA VERNAZZA’S LIFE
        • Introductory.
        • I. Battista’s Life, from April 1497 to June 1510.
        • II. Battista and her God-father, Tommaso Moro.
        • III. Battista’s Colloquies, November 1554 to Ascension-Day 1555.
        • IV. Some further Letters of Battista, 1575 to 1581.
        • V. Battista’s Death, 1587.
      • Introductory.
      • I. Battista’s Life, from April 1497 to June 1510.
      • II. Battista and her God-father, Tommaso Moro.
      • III. Battista’s Colloquies, November 1554 to Ascension-Day 1555.
      • IV. Some further Letters of Battista, 1575 to 1581.
      • V. Battista’s Death, 1587.
    • CHAPTER III CATHERINE FIESCA ADORNA’S LIFE, UP TO HER CONVERSION; AND THE CHIEF PECULIARITIES PREDOMINANT THROUGHOUT HER CONVERT YEARS
      • Introductory.
      • I. Proposed Study of the Mystical-Volitional Element in a Particular, Concrete Instance: St. Catherine of Genoa.
      • II. The Materials and Aids towards such a Study.
      • III. Peculiarities of the Genoese Climate And Geographical Position; of the Ligurian Character; and of the Times into which Catherine was born. Her Family, Father and Mother.
      • IV. Catherine’s Life, up to the Preliminaries of her Conversion: Autumn 1447-Mid-March 1474.
      • V. Her Conversion, with its immediate Preliminaries and Consequences, March 1474.
      • VI. The Two Conceptions concerning the Character and Rationale of her Penitential Period and of her whole Convert Life. The Position adopted here.
      • VII. Catherine and the Holy Eucharist.
      • VIII. Catherine and Confession and Direction.
      • IX. Catherine and Indulgences.
      • X. Peculiarities concerning the Invocation of Saints and Intercessory Prayer.
    • Introductory.
    • I. Proposed Study of the Mystical-Volitional Element in a Particular, Concrete Instance: St. Catherine of Genoa.
    • II. The Materials and Aids towards such a Study.
    • III. Peculiarities of the Genoese Climate And Geographical Position; of the Ligurian Character; and of the Times into which Catherine was born. Her Family, Father and Mother.
    • IV. Catherine’s Life, up to the Preliminaries of her Conversion: Autumn 1447-Mid-March 1474.
    • V. Her Conversion, with its immediate Preliminaries and Consequences, March 1474.
    • VI. The Two Conceptions concerning the Character and Rationale of her Penitential Period and of her whole Convert Life. The Position adopted here.
    • VII. Catherine and the Holy Eucharist.
    • VIII. Catherine and Confession and Direction.
    • IX. Catherine and Indulgences.
    • X. Peculiarities concerning the Invocation of Saints and Intercessory Prayer.
    • CHAPTER IV CATHERINE’S LIFE FROM 1473 TO 1506 AND ITS MAIN CHANGES AND GROWTH
      • I. First Period of Catherine’s Convert Life: Giuliano’s Bankruptcy and Conversion; their Work among the Poor, March 1473 to May 1477.
      • II. Catherine and Tommasa Fiesca: their Difference of Character and attrait. Peculiarity of Catherine’s Penitence and Health during this time.
      • III. Change in the Temper of Catherine’s Penitence, from May 1474 onwards.
      • IV. Catherine’s Great Fasts.
      • V. Second, Central Period of Catherine’s Convert Life, 1477-1499: its Special Spiritual Features.
      • VI. Catherine and Giuliano move into the Hospital in 1479, never again to quit it. She is Matron from 1490 to 1495.
      • VII. Catherine and the Plague. The Outbreak of 1493.
      • VIII. Catherine and Ettore Vernazza, 1493-1495.
      • IX. Catherine’s Health breaks down, 1496; other Events of the Same Year.
      • X. Events of 1497.
      • XI. Beginning of her Third, Last Period; End of the Extraordinary Fasts; First Relations with Don Marabotto.
      • XII. Her Conversations with her Disciples; “Caterina Serafina.” Don Marabotto and the Possessed Maid.
      • XIII. Catherine’s Sympathy with Animal- and Plant-Life: her Love of the Open Air. Her Deep Self-knowledge as to the Healthiness or Morbidness of her Psycho-Physical States.
      • XIV. Catherine’s Social Joys and Sorrows, 1501-1507.
    • I. First Period of Catherine’s Convert Life: Giuliano’s Bankruptcy and Conversion; their Work among the Poor, March 1473 to May 1477.
    • II. Catherine and Tommasa Fiesca: their Difference of Character and attrait. Peculiarity of Catherine’s Penitence and Health during this time.
    • III. Change in the Temper of Catherine’s Penitence, from May 1474 onwards.
    • IV. Catherine’s Great Fasts.
    • V. Second, Central Period of Catherine’s Convert Life, 1477-1499: its Special Spiritual Features.
    • VI. Catherine and Giuliano move into the Hospital in 1479, never again to quit it. She is Matron from 1490 to 1495.
    • VII. Catherine and the Plague. The Outbreak of 1493.
    • VIII. Catherine and Ettore Vernazza, 1493-1495.
    • IX. Catherine’s Health breaks down, 1496; other Events of the Same Year.
    • X. Events of 1497.
    • XI. Beginning of her Third, Last Period; End of the Extraordinary Fasts; First Relations with Don Marabotto.
    • XII. Her Conversations with her Disciples; “Caterina Serafina.” Don Marabotto and the Possessed Maid.
    • XIII. Catherine’s Sympathy with Animal- and Plant-Life: her Love of the Open Air. Her Deep Self-knowledge as to the Healthiness or Morbidness of her Psycho-Physical States.
    • XIV. Catherine’s Social Joys and Sorrows, 1501-1507.
    • CHAPTER V CATHERINE’S LAST FOUR YEARS, 1506 TO 1510—SKETCH OF HER CHARACTER, DOCTRINE, AND SPIRIT
      • I. Catherine’s External Interests and Activities up to May 1510. Occasional Slight Deviations from her Old Balance. Immensely Close Interconnection of her whole Mental and Psycho-Physical Nature. Impressions as connected with the Five Senses.
      • II. More or Less Maladif Experiences and Actions.
      • III. Catherine’s History from May to September 9, 1510.
      • IV. The Last Six Days of Catherine’s Life, September 10-15.
      • V. Sketch of Catherine’s Spiritual Character and Significance.
    • I. Catherine’s External Interests and Activities up to May 1510. Occasional Slight Deviations from her Old Balance. Immensely Close Interconnection of her whole Mental and Psycho-Physical Nature. Impressions as connected with the Five Senses.
    • II. More or Less Maladif Experiences and Actions.
    • III. Catherine’s History from May to September 9, 1510.
    • IV. The Last Six Days of Catherine’s Life, September 10-15.
    • V. Sketch of Catherine’s Spiritual Character and Significance.
    • CHAPTER VI CATHERINE’S DOCTRINE
      • I. God as Creative Love. The Creature’s True and False Self; True and False Love.
      • II. Sin, Purification, Illumination.
      • III. The Three Categories and the Two Ways.
      • IV. The Other Worlds.
    • I. God as Creative Love. The Creature’s True and False Self; True and False Love.
    • II. Sin, Purification, Illumination.
    • III. The Three Categories and the Two Ways.
    • IV. The Other Worlds.
    • CHAPTER VII CATHERINE’S REMAINS AND CULTUS; THE FATE OF HER TWO PRIEST FRIENDS AND OF HER DOMESTICS; AND THE REMAINING HISTORY OF ETTORE VERNAZZA
      • Introductory.
      • I. The Burial and the Events immediately surrounding it. September 15 to December 10, 1510.
      • II. The Different Removals of the Remains, and the Chief Stages of her Official Cultus.
      • III. The Fate of Catherine’s Priest Friends.
      • IV. The Fate of Catherine’s Three Maid-Servants.
      • V. The Two Vernazzas: their Debt to Catherine, and Catherine’s Debt to them.
      • VI. Ettore Vernazza’s Life, from 1509 to 1512.
      • VII. Ettore in Rome and Naples; his Second Will; his Work in the Genoese Prisons.
      • VIII. Ettore again in Naples; his Death in Genoa; Peculiarities of his Posthumous Fame.
    • Introductory.
    • I. The Burial and the Events immediately surrounding it. September 15 to December 10, 1510.
    • II. The Different Removals of the Remains, and the Chief Stages of her Official Cultus.
    • III. The Fate of Catherine’s Priest Friends.
    • IV. The Fate of Catherine’s Three Maid-Servants.
    • V. The Two Vernazzas: their Debt to Catherine, and Catherine’s Debt to them.
    • VI. Ettore Vernazza’s Life, from 1509 to 1512.
    • VII. Ettore in Rome and Naples; his Second Will; his Work in the Genoese Prisons.
    • VIII. Ettore again in Naples; his Death in Genoa; Peculiarities of his Posthumous Fame.
    • CHAPTER VIII BATTISTA VERNAZZA’S LIFE
      • Introductory.
      • I. Battista’s Life, from April 1497 to June 1510.
      • II. Battista and her God-father, Tommaso Moro.
      • III. Battista’s Colloquies, November 1554 to Ascension-Day 1555.
      • IV. Some further Letters of Battista, 1575 to 1581.
      • V. Battista’s Death, 1587.
    • Introductory.
    • I. Battista’s Life, from April 1497 to June 1510.
    • II. Battista and her God-father, Tommaso Moro.
    • III. Battista’s Colloquies, November 1554 to Ascension-Day 1555.
    • IV. Some further Letters of Battista, 1575 to 1581.
    • V. Battista’s Death, 1587.
    • CONCLUSION WHEREIN LIES THE SECRET OF SPIRITUAL PERSUASIVENESS
      • I. The Question.
        • II. The Answer.
      • II. The Answer.
    • I. The Question.
      • II. The Answer.
    • II. The Answer.
    • APPENDIX TO PART II CHRONOLOGICAL ACCOUNT AND CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THE MATERIALS FOR THE RE-CONSTITUTION OF SAINT CATHERINE’S LIFE AND TEACHING.
      • Introduction.
        • I.
        • II.
      • I.
      • II.
      • First Division: Account and Analysis of the Documents previous, and immediately subsequent to, the “Vita e Dottrina” with the “Dicchiarazione.”
        • I. First Stage, 1456 to September 12, 1510, all Legal.
        • II. Second Stage: Five further Official and Legal Documents, 1511-1526; and Four Mortuary Dates, 1524-1587.
        • III. Third Stage: Bishop Giustiniano’s Account of Catherine’s Life, Remains, and Biography, 1537.
        • IV. Fourth Stage: The Two Oldest Extant Manuscripts of the “Vita e Dottrina” with the “Dicchiarazione.”
        • V. Fifth Stage: Manuscript C.
        • VI. Sixth Stage: First Printed Edition of the “Vita-Dottrina-Dicchiarazione,” 1551; Examination of all it possesses in addition to MSS. A, B and C, apart from the “Dialogo.”
        • VII. Seventh Stage: The Second “Chapter” of the “Dialogo,” which appears for the First Time in the Printed “Vita,” 1551.
        • VIII. Seventh Stage continued: Minute Analysis of one Passage from the Second “Chapter.”
        • IX. Seventh Stage concluded: Character and Authorship of this Second “Chapter.”
      • I. First Stage, 1456 to September 12, 1510, all Legal.
      • II. Second Stage: Five further Official and Legal Documents, 1511-1526; and Four Mortuary Dates, 1524-1587.
      • III. Third Stage: Bishop Giustiniano’s Account of Catherine’s Life, Remains, and Biography, 1537.
      • IV. Fourth Stage: The Two Oldest Extant Manuscripts of the “Vita e Dottrina” with the “Dicchiarazione.”
      • V. Fifth Stage: Manuscript C.
      • VI. Sixth Stage: First Printed Edition of the “Vita-Dottrina-Dicchiarazione,” 1551; Examination of all it possesses in addition to MSS. A, B and C, apart from the “Dialogo.”
      • VII. Seventh Stage: The Second “Chapter” of the “Dialogo,” which appears for the First Time in the Printed “Vita,” 1551.
      • VIII. Seventh Stage continued: Minute Analysis of one Passage from the Second “Chapter.”
      • IX. Seventh Stage concluded: Character and Authorship of this Second “Chapter.”
      • Second Division: Analysis, Assignation, and Appraisement of the “Vita-Dottrina-Dicchiarazione” Corpus, in Eight Sections.
        • I. The “Dicchiarazione”: the Two Stages Of its Existence.
        • II. The earlier “Dicchiarazione,” and its Theological Glosses.
        • III. Five Conclusions concerning the History of the “Dicchiarazione.”
        • IV. The “Vita”-proper, its Divisions and Parts, and Chief Secondary and Authentic Constituents.
        • V. Age and Authorship of the Literature retained.
        • VI. Analysis of the Conversion-Narratives.
        • VII. The Sayings-Passages: Three Tests for discriminating Authentic from Secondary Sayings.
        • VIII. Conclusion. At least Six Stages in the upbuilding of the Complete Book of 1551. The Slight Changes introduced since then. First claims to Authorship for Catherine.
      • I. The “Dicchiarazione”: the Two Stages Of its Existence.
      • II. The earlier “Dicchiarazione,” and its Theological Glosses.
      • III. Five Conclusions concerning the History of the “Dicchiarazione.”
      • IV. The “Vita”-proper, its Divisions and Parts, and Chief Secondary and Authentic Constituents.
      • V. Age and Authorship of the Literature retained.
      • VI. Analysis of the Conversion-Narratives.
      • VII. The Sayings-Passages: Three Tests for discriminating Authentic from Secondary Sayings.
      • VIII. Conclusion. At least Six Stages in the upbuilding of the Complete Book of 1551. The Slight Changes introduced since then. First claims to Authorship for Catherine.
    • Introduction.
      • I.
      • II.
    • I.
    • II.
    • First Division: Account and Analysis of the Documents previous, and immediately subsequent to, the “Vita e Dottrina” with the “Dicchiarazione.”
      • I. First Stage, 1456 to September 12, 1510, all Legal.
      • II. Second Stage: Five further Official and Legal Documents, 1511-1526; and Four Mortuary Dates, 1524-1587.
      • III. Third Stage: Bishop Giustiniano’s Account of Catherine’s Life, Remains, and Biography, 1537.
      • IV. Fourth Stage: The Two Oldest Extant Manuscripts of the “Vita e Dottrina” with the “Dicchiarazione.”
      • V. Fifth Stage: Manuscript C.
      • VI. Sixth Stage: First Printed Edition of the “Vita-Dottrina-Dicchiarazione,” 1551; Examination of all it possesses in addition to MSS. A, B and C, apart from the “Dialogo.”
      • VII. Seventh Stage: The Second “Chapter” of the “Dialogo,” which appears for the First Time in the Printed “Vita,” 1551.
      • VIII. Seventh Stage continued: Minute Analysis of one Passage from the Second “Chapter.”
      • IX. Seventh Stage concluded: Character and Authorship of this Second “Chapter.”
    • I. First Stage, 1456 to September 12, 1510, all Legal.
    • II. Second Stage: Five further Official and Legal Documents, 1511-1526; and Four Mortuary Dates, 1524-1587.
    • III. Third Stage: Bishop Giustiniano’s Account of Catherine’s Life, Remains, and Biography, 1537.
    • IV. Fourth Stage: The Two Oldest Extant Manuscripts of the “Vita e Dottrina” with the “Dicchiarazione.”
    • V. Fifth Stage: Manuscript C.
    • VI. Sixth Stage: First Printed Edition of the “Vita-Dottrina-Dicchiarazione,” 1551; Examination of all it possesses in addition to MSS. A, B and C, apart from the “Dialogo.”
    • VII. Seventh Stage: The Second “Chapter” of the “Dialogo,” which appears for the First Time in the Printed “Vita,” 1551.
    • VIII. Seventh Stage continued: Minute Analysis of one Passage from the Second “Chapter.”
    • IX. Seventh Stage concluded: Character and Authorship of this Second “Chapter.”
    • Second Division: Analysis, Assignation, and Appraisement of the “Vita-Dottrina-Dicchiarazione” Corpus, in Eight Sections.
      • I. The “Dicchiarazione”: the Two Stages Of its Existence.
      • II. The earlier “Dicchiarazione,” and its Theological Glosses.
      • III. Five Conclusions concerning the History of the “Dicchiarazione.”
      • IV. The “Vita”-proper, its Divisions and Parts, and Chief Secondary and Authentic Constituents.
      • V. Age and Authorship of the Literature retained.
      • VI. Analysis of the Conversion-Narratives.
      • VII. The Sayings-Passages: Three Tests for discriminating Authentic from Secondary Sayings.
      • VIII. Conclusion. At least Six Stages in the upbuilding of the Complete Book of 1551. The Slight Changes introduced since then. First claims to Authorship for Catherine.
    • I. The “Dicchiarazione”: the Two Stages Of its Existence.
    • II. The earlier “Dicchiarazione,” and its Theological Glosses.
    • III. Five Conclusions concerning the History of the “Dicchiarazione.”
    • IV. The “Vita”-proper, its Divisions and Parts, and Chief Secondary and Authentic Constituents.
    • V. Age and Authorship of the Literature retained.
    • VI. Analysis of the Conversion-Narratives.
    • VII. The Sayings-Passages: Three Tests for discriminating Authentic from Secondary Sayings.
    • VIII. Conclusion. At least Six Stages in the upbuilding of the Complete Book of 1551. The Slight Changes introduced since then. First claims to Authorship for Catherine.
    • FOOTNOTES
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