The Mystical Element of Religion, as studied in Saint Catherine of Genoa and her friends, Volume 2 (of 2)
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The Mystical Element of Religion, as studied in Saint Catherine of Genoa and her friends, Volume 2 (of 2)

By Baron Friedrich von Hügel
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Book Description
Table of Contents
  • CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME
  • THE MYSTICAL ELEMENT OF RELIGION
    • PART III CRITICAL
      • CHAPTER IX PSYCHO-PHYSICAL AND TEMPERAMENTAL QUESTIONS
        • Introductory.
        • I. Catherine’s Third Period, 1497 to 1510.
        • II. Conclusions Concerning Catherine’s Psycho-physical Condition During This Last Period.
        • III. Catherine’s Psycho-physical Condition, its Likeness and Unlikeness To Hysteria.
        • IV. First Period of Catherine’s Life, 1447 to 1477, in its Three Stages.
        • V. The Second, Great Middle Period of Catherine’s Life, 1477 to 1499.
        • VI. Three Rules which seem to govern the Relations between Psycho-physical Peculiarities and Sanctity in general.
        • VII. Perennial Freshness of the Great Mystics’ Main Spiritual Test, in Contradistinction To Their Secondary, Psychological Contention. Two Special Difficulties.
      • Introductory.
      • I. Catherine’s Third Period, 1497 to 1510.
      • II. Conclusions Concerning Catherine’s Psycho-physical Condition During This Last Period.
      • III. Catherine’s Psycho-physical Condition, its Likeness and Unlikeness To Hysteria.
      • IV. First Period of Catherine’s Life, 1447 to 1477, in its Three Stages.
      • V. The Second, Great Middle Period of Catherine’s Life, 1477 to 1499.
      • VI. Three Rules which seem to govern the Relations between Psycho-physical Peculiarities and Sanctity in general.
      • VII. Perennial Freshness of the Great Mystics’ Main Spiritual Test, in Contradistinction To Their Secondary, Psychological Contention. Two Special Difficulties.
      • CHAPTER X THE MAIN LITERARY SOURCES OF CATHERINE’S CONCEPTIONS
        • INTRODUCTORY.
        • I. The Pauline Writings: the Two Sources of their Pre-Conversion Assumptions; Catherine’s Preponderant Attitude towards each Position.
        • II. The Joannine Writings.
        • III. The Areopagite Writings.
        • IV. Jacopone Da Todi’s “lode.”
        • V. Points Common to all Five Minds; and Catherine’s Main Difference from her Four Predecessors.
      • INTRODUCTORY.
      • I. The Pauline Writings: the Two Sources of their Pre-Conversion Assumptions; Catherine’s Preponderant Attitude towards each Position.
      • II. The Joannine Writings.
      • III. The Areopagite Writings.
      • IV. Jacopone Da Todi’s “lode.”
      • V. Points Common to all Five Minds; and Catherine’s Main Difference from her Four Predecessors.
      • CHAPTER XI CATHERINE’S LESS ULTIMATE THIS-WORLD DOCTRINES
        • Introductory: Catherine’s less ultimate Positions, concerning our Life here, are Four.
        • I. Interpretative Religion.
        • II. Dualistic Attitude towards the Body.
        • III. Quietude and Passivity. Points in this tendency to be considered here.
        • IV. Pure Love, or Disinterested Religion: its Distinction from Quietism.
      • Introductory: Catherine’s less ultimate Positions, concerning our Life here, are Four.
      • I. Interpretative Religion.
      • II. Dualistic Attitude towards the Body.
      • III. Quietude and Passivity. Points in this tendency to be considered here.
      • IV. Pure Love, or Disinterested Religion: its Distinction from Quietism.
      • CHAPTER XII THE AFTER-LIFE PROBLEMS AND DOCTRINES
        • I. The Chief Present-day Problems, Perplexities, and Requirements with Regard to the After-Life in General.
        • II. Catherine’s General After-Life Conceptions.
        • III. Catherine and Eternal Punishment.
        • IV. Catherine and Purgatory.
        • V. Catherine and Heaven—Three Perplexities to be considered.
      • I. The Chief Present-day Problems, Perplexities, and Requirements with Regard to the After-Life in General.
      • II. Catherine’s General After-Life Conceptions.
      • III. Catherine and Eternal Punishment.
      • IV. Catherine and Purgatory.
      • V. Catherine and Heaven—Three Perplexities to be considered.
      • CHAPTER XIII THE FIRST THREE ULTIMATE QUESTIONS. THE RELATIONS BETWEEN MORALITY, MYSTICISM, PHILOSOPHY, AND RELIGION. MYSTICISM AND THE LIMITS OF HUMAN EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE. MYSTICISM AND THE NATURE OF EVIL
        • I. The Relations between Morality and Mysticism Philosophy and Religion.
        • II. Mysticism and the Limits of Human Knowledge and Experience.
        • III. Mysticism and the Question of Evil.
      • I. The Relations between Morality and Mysticism Philosophy and Religion.
      • II. Mysticism and the Limits of Human Knowledge and Experience.
      • III. Mysticism and the Question of Evil.
      • CHAPTER XIV THE TWO FINAL PROBLEMS: MYSTICISM AND PANTHEISM. THE IMMANENCE OF GOD, AND SPIRITUAL PERSONALITY, HUMAN AND DIVINE
        • INTRODUCTORY. Impossibility of completely abstracting from the theoretical form in the study of the experimental matter.
        • I. Relations between the General and the Particular, God and Individual Things, according to Aristotle, the Neo-Platonists, and the Medieval Strict Realists.
        • II. Relations between God and the Human Soul.
        • III. Mysticism and Pantheism: their Differences and Points of Likeness.
        • IV. The Divine Immanence; Spiritual Personality.
      • INTRODUCTORY. Impossibility of completely abstracting from the theoretical form in the study of the experimental matter.
      • I. Relations between the General and the Particular, God and Individual Things, according to Aristotle, the Neo-Platonists, and the Medieval Strict Realists.
      • II. Relations between God and the Human Soul.
      • III. Mysticism and Pantheism: their Differences and Points of Likeness.
      • IV. The Divine Immanence; Spiritual Personality.
      • CHAPTER XV SUMMING UP OF THE WHOLE BOOK. BACK THROUGH ASCETICISM, SOCIAL RELIGION, AND THE SCIENTIFIC HABIT OF MIND, TO THE MYSTICAL ELEMENT OF RELIGION.
        • I. Asceticism and Mysticism.
        • II. Social Religion and Mysticism.
        • III. The Scientific Habit and Mysticism.
        • IV. Final Summary and Return to the Starting-point of the Whole Inquiry: the Necessity, and yet the Almost Inevitable Mutual Hostility, of the Three Great Forces of the Soul and of the Three Corresponding Elements of Religion.
      • I. Asceticism and Mysticism.
      • II. Social Religion and Mysticism.
      • III. The Scientific Habit and Mysticism.
      • IV. Final Summary and Return to the Starting-point of the Whole Inquiry: the Necessity, and yet the Almost Inevitable Mutual Hostility, of the Three Great Forces of the Soul and of the Three Corresponding Elements of Religion.
    • CHAPTER IX PSYCHO-PHYSICAL AND TEMPERAMENTAL QUESTIONS
      • Introductory.
      • I. Catherine’s Third Period, 1497 to 1510.
      • II. Conclusions Concerning Catherine’s Psycho-physical Condition During This Last Period.
      • III. Catherine’s Psycho-physical Condition, its Likeness and Unlikeness To Hysteria.
      • IV. First Period of Catherine’s Life, 1447 to 1477, in its Three Stages.
      • V. The Second, Great Middle Period of Catherine’s Life, 1477 to 1499.
      • VI. Three Rules which seem to govern the Relations between Psycho-physical Peculiarities and Sanctity in general.
      • VII. Perennial Freshness of the Great Mystics’ Main Spiritual Test, in Contradistinction To Their Secondary, Psychological Contention. Two Special Difficulties.
    • Introductory.
    • I. Catherine’s Third Period, 1497 to 1510.
    • II. Conclusions Concerning Catherine’s Psycho-physical Condition During This Last Period.
    • III. Catherine’s Psycho-physical Condition, its Likeness and Unlikeness To Hysteria.
    • IV. First Period of Catherine’s Life, 1447 to 1477, in its Three Stages.
    • V. The Second, Great Middle Period of Catherine’s Life, 1477 to 1499.
    • VI. Three Rules which seem to govern the Relations between Psycho-physical Peculiarities and Sanctity in general.
    • VII. Perennial Freshness of the Great Mystics’ Main Spiritual Test, in Contradistinction To Their Secondary, Psychological Contention. Two Special Difficulties.
    • CHAPTER X THE MAIN LITERARY SOURCES OF CATHERINE’S CONCEPTIONS
      • INTRODUCTORY.
      • I. The Pauline Writings: the Two Sources of their Pre-Conversion Assumptions; Catherine’s Preponderant Attitude towards each Position.
      • II. The Joannine Writings.
      • III. The Areopagite Writings.
      • IV. Jacopone Da Todi’s “lode.”
      • V. Points Common to all Five Minds; and Catherine’s Main Difference from her Four Predecessors.
    • INTRODUCTORY.
    • I. The Pauline Writings: the Two Sources of their Pre-Conversion Assumptions; Catherine’s Preponderant Attitude towards each Position.
    • II. The Joannine Writings.
    • III. The Areopagite Writings.
    • IV. Jacopone Da Todi’s “lode.”
    • V. Points Common to all Five Minds; and Catherine’s Main Difference from her Four Predecessors.
    • CHAPTER XI CATHERINE’S LESS ULTIMATE THIS-WORLD DOCTRINES
      • Introductory: Catherine’s less ultimate Positions, concerning our Life here, are Four.
      • I. Interpretative Religion.
      • II. Dualistic Attitude towards the Body.
      • III. Quietude and Passivity. Points in this tendency to be considered here.
      • IV. Pure Love, or Disinterested Religion: its Distinction from Quietism.
    • Introductory: Catherine’s less ultimate Positions, concerning our Life here, are Four.
    • I. Interpretative Religion.
    • II. Dualistic Attitude towards the Body.
    • III. Quietude and Passivity. Points in this tendency to be considered here.
    • IV. Pure Love, or Disinterested Religion: its Distinction from Quietism.
    • CHAPTER XII THE AFTER-LIFE PROBLEMS AND DOCTRINES
      • I. The Chief Present-day Problems, Perplexities, and Requirements with Regard to the After-Life in General.
      • II. Catherine’s General After-Life Conceptions.
      • III. Catherine and Eternal Punishment.
      • IV. Catherine and Purgatory.
      • V. Catherine and Heaven—Three Perplexities to be considered.
    • I. The Chief Present-day Problems, Perplexities, and Requirements with Regard to the After-Life in General.
    • II. Catherine’s General After-Life Conceptions.
    • III. Catherine and Eternal Punishment.
    • IV. Catherine and Purgatory.
    • V. Catherine and Heaven—Three Perplexities to be considered.
    • CHAPTER XIII THE FIRST THREE ULTIMATE QUESTIONS. THE RELATIONS BETWEEN MORALITY, MYSTICISM, PHILOSOPHY, AND RELIGION. MYSTICISM AND THE LIMITS OF HUMAN EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE. MYSTICISM AND THE NATURE OF EVIL
      • I. The Relations between Morality and Mysticism Philosophy and Religion.
      • II. Mysticism and the Limits of Human Knowledge and Experience.
      • III. Mysticism and the Question of Evil.
    • I. The Relations between Morality and Mysticism Philosophy and Religion.
    • II. Mysticism and the Limits of Human Knowledge and Experience.
    • III. Mysticism and the Question of Evil.
    • CHAPTER XIV THE TWO FINAL PROBLEMS: MYSTICISM AND PANTHEISM. THE IMMANENCE OF GOD, AND SPIRITUAL PERSONALITY, HUMAN AND DIVINE
      • INTRODUCTORY. Impossibility of completely abstracting from the theoretical form in the study of the experimental matter.
      • I. Relations between the General and the Particular, God and Individual Things, according to Aristotle, the Neo-Platonists, and the Medieval Strict Realists.
      • II. Relations between God and the Human Soul.
      • III. Mysticism and Pantheism: their Differences and Points of Likeness.
      • IV. The Divine Immanence; Spiritual Personality.
    • INTRODUCTORY. Impossibility of completely abstracting from the theoretical form in the study of the experimental matter.
    • I. Relations between the General and the Particular, God and Individual Things, according to Aristotle, the Neo-Platonists, and the Medieval Strict Realists.
    • II. Relations between God and the Human Soul.
    • III. Mysticism and Pantheism: their Differences and Points of Likeness.
    • IV. The Divine Immanence; Spiritual Personality.
    • CHAPTER XV SUMMING UP OF THE WHOLE BOOK. BACK THROUGH ASCETICISM, SOCIAL RELIGION, AND THE SCIENTIFIC HABIT OF MIND, TO THE MYSTICAL ELEMENT OF RELIGION.
      • I. Asceticism and Mysticism.
      • II. Social Religion and Mysticism.
      • III. The Scientific Habit and Mysticism.
      • IV. Final Summary and Return to the Starting-point of the Whole Inquiry: the Necessity, and yet the Almost Inevitable Mutual Hostility, of the Three Great Forces of the Soul and of the Three Corresponding Elements of Religion.
    • I. Asceticism and Mysticism.
    • II. Social Religion and Mysticism.
    • III. The Scientific Habit and Mysticism.
    • IV. Final Summary and Return to the Starting-point of the Whole Inquiry: the Necessity, and yet the Almost Inevitable Mutual Hostility, of the Three Great Forces of the Soul and of the Three Corresponding Elements of Religion.
    • INDEX
      • I. OF SUBJECT-MATTERS
      • II. OF LITERARY REFERENCES
        • Holy Scripture—Old Testament
        • New Testament
      • Holy Scripture—Old Testament
      • New Testament
    • I. OF SUBJECT-MATTERS
    • II. OF LITERARY REFERENCES
      • Holy Scripture—Old Testament
      • New Testament
    • Holy Scripture—Old Testament
    • New Testament
    • FOOTNOTES
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