Humour, Wit, & Satire of the Seventeenth Century
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Humour, Wit, & Satire of the Seventeenth Century

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  • HUMOUR, WIT, & SATIRE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
    • RICHARD TARLTON.
  • HUMOUR, WIT, & SATIRE of the SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
    • Preface.
    • Humour, Wit, and Satire of the Seventeenth Century.
      • On a drawer drunk.
        • Upon the weights of a Clock.
        • Nonsense.
        • Of Lynus borrowing.
      • Upon the weights of a Clock.
      • Nonsense.
      • Of Lynus borrowing.
    • On a drawer drunk.
      • Upon the weights of a Clock.
      • Nonsense.
      • Of Lynus borrowing.
    • Upon the weights of a Clock.
    • Nonsense.
    • Of Lynus borrowing.
    • The Woman to the Plow and The Man to the Hen Roost.
      • On a cowardly Souldier.
      • On a fly in a glasse.
      • Upon a Churle that was a great usurer.
      • The Devill and the Fryar.
      • On Battus.
    • On a cowardly Souldier.
    • On a fly in a glasse.
    • Upon a Churle that was a great usurer.
    • The Devill and the Fryar.
    • On Battus.
    • The Unconscionable Batchelors of DARBY,
      • In Getam.
      • On Button a Sexton making a grave.
      • On Jack Wiseman.
      • Of a Woman's Kindnesse to her Husband.
      • Of Marcus.
      • On Sextus.
      • The Rurall Dance about the May-pole.19
      • On Charismus.
      • Of a drunken Smith.
      • Sorte tuâ contentus.
    • In Getam.
    • On Button a Sexton making a grave.
    • On Jack Wiseman.
    • Of a Woman's Kindnesse to her Husband.
    • Of Marcus.
    • On Sextus.
    • The Rurall Dance about the May-pole.19
    • On Charismus.
    • Of a drunken Smith.
    • Sorte tuâ contentus.
    • [15.] THE JOLLY WELSH WOMAN
      • On a Watch lost in a Tavern.
      • Of a Precise Taylor.
      • On a gentleman that married an heire privately at the Tower.
      • Of Galla's goodly Periwigge.
    • On a Watch lost in a Tavern.
    • Of a Precise Taylor.
    • On a gentleman that married an heire privately at the Tower.
    • Of Galla's goodly Periwigge.
    • An Invitation to Lubberland.
      • Epitaph On an usurer.
      • In praise of the Black Jack28
    • Epitaph On an usurer.
    • In praise of the Black Jack28
    • The invincible PRIDE of WOMEN or The London Tradesman's Lamentation
      • On a little Gentleman and one Mr Story.
      • Epitaph on a Scrivener.
      • These following are to be understood two ways.
    • On a little Gentleman and one Mr Story.
    • Epitaph on a Scrivener.
    • These following are to be understood two ways.
    • The Devil's Oak:
      • The Long Nos'd Lass
    • The Long Nos'd Lass
    • The Long-Nos'd LASS or
      • A Dialogue concerning Hair, between a Man and a Woman.
        • M.
        • W.
        • M.
        • W.
        • M.
        • W.
        • M.
        • W.
      • M.
      • W.
      • M.
      • W.
      • M.
      • W.
      • M.
      • W.
    • A Dialogue concerning Hair, between a Man and a Woman.
      • M.
      • W.
      • M.
      • W.
      • M.
      • W.
      • M.
      • W.
    • M.
    • W.
    • M.
    • W.
    • M.
    • W.
    • M.
    • W.
    • MARK NOBLE'S FROLLICK;
      • Against Swearing.
      • One fighting with his wife.
    • Against Swearing.
    • One fighting with his wife.
    • The Welch Mans Inventory.
      • Upon one Day that ran away, and laid the Key under Door.
    • Upon one Day that ran away, and laid the Key under Door.
    • THE GREAT BOOBEE.53
      • Ad Johannuelem Leporem, Lepidissimum; Carmen Heroicum.
      • Of Treason.
      • On the word intollerable.
    • Ad Johannuelem Leporem, Lepidissimum; Carmen Heroicum.
    • Of Treason.
    • On the word intollerable.
    • The cunning Northerne Begger
      • A contest at the Hoop-Tavern between two Lawyers.
      • Of inclosing a Common.
    • A contest at the Hoop-Tavern between two Lawyers.
    • Of inclosing a Common.
    • A Caution for Scolds or A True Way of Taming a Shrew.
      • On Galla going to the Bath.
      • On a farmer knighted.
      • Of Milo the Glutton.
    • On Galla going to the Bath.
    • On a farmer knighted.
    • Of Milo the Glutton.
    • A Pleasant new Ballad you here may behold, How the Devill, though subtle, was guld by a Scold.
      • Solution.
      • On one in debt.
      • Scylla toothlesse.
    • Solution.
    • On one in debt.
    • Scylla toothlesse.
    • The Picture of an English Antick, with a List of his ridiculous Habits and apish Gestures.
      • A new married Bride.
      • Of finding a hare.
      • In Richardum quendam, Divitem, Avarum.
    • A new married Bride.
    • Of finding a hare.
    • In Richardum quendam, Divitem, Avarum.
    • The Dumb MAID,62 or, the Young Gallant Trappan'd.
      • Morrall.
      • The Connicatcher68 and Priest of Paris.
      • On Bond the Usurer.
    • Morrall.
    • The Connicatcher68 and Priest of Paris.
    • On Bond the Usurer.
    • THE POETS DREAM69 OR, The Great Out-cry and Lamentable Complaint of the Land against BAYLIFFS and their DOGS.
      • The dumbe wife recovered her speech.
      • A Courtier and a Scholler meeting.
    • The dumbe wife recovered her speech.
    • A Courtier and a Scholler meeting.
    • The little Barly-Corne.73
      • The Tanner and the Butcher's dogge.
      • Cede majoribus.
      • Why women weare a fall.
    • The Tanner and the Butcher's dogge.
    • Cede majoribus.
    • Why women weare a fall.
    • The poore man payes for all.
      • A Witty answer of a Countrey fellow.
    • A Witty answer of a Countrey fellow.
    • A merry Jest of John Tomson and Jakaman his Wife Whose Jealousie was justly the cause of all their strife.
      • Conditions of Sale.
    • Conditions of Sale.
    • THE VIRGIN RACE Or, York-shires Glory.
      • Quidam erat.
    • Quidam erat.
    • Mercurius Matrimonialis or Chapmen for the Ladies lately Offered to Sale by Way of Auction.
    • SELDOME CLEANELY90
    • The Astrologer's Bugg Beare.
    • The country-mans lamentation for the death of his cow.
      • On a certaine present sent from an Archbishop to his friend.
      • Englished thus.
    • On a certaine present sent from an Archbishop to his friend.
    • Englished thus.
    • NEWES FROM MORE-LANE.
      • The Tune is, A Health to the best of Men.
      • Chronogramma. Anno 1628. obiit GeorgIVs DVX BVCkInghaMIæ
      • On Anne Angel marrying a Lawyer.
      • To my Booke-seller.
    • The Tune is, A Health to the best of Men.
    • Chronogramma. Anno 1628. obiit GeorgIVs DVX BVCkInghaMIæ
    • On Anne Angel marrying a Lawyer.
    • To my Booke-seller.
    • A Merry Dialogue between Thomas and John. in the praise and dispraise of Women and Wine.
      • Thomas
        • John
        • Thomas
        • John
        • Thomas
        • John
        • Thomas
        • John
        • Thomas
        • John
        • Thomas
        • John
        • Thomas
        • John
        • A Bovlster Lectvre.
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • A Bovlster Lectvre.
    • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • Thomas
      • John
      • A Bovlster Lectvre.
    • John
    • Thomas
    • John
    • Thomas
    • John
    • Thomas
    • John
    • Thomas
    • John
    • Thomas
    • John
    • Thomas
    • John
    • A Bovlster Lectvre.
    • PORTSMOUTH'S Lamentation
      • To one that desired me not to name him.
    • To one that desired me not to name him.
    • The Humour of Bumpkin.
    • A pleasant new Ballad to sing both Even and Morne, Of the bloody murther of Sir John Barley corne.
      • How Tarlton tooke Tobacco at the first comming up of it.
    • How Tarlton tooke Tobacco at the first comming up of it.
    • The PARLIAMENTS X Commandements
      • The Parliaments PATER NOSTER.
      • The ARTICLES of the FAITH.
    • The Parliaments PATER NOSTER.
    • The ARTICLES of the FAITH.
    • The Miser mump'd of his Gold.
    • THE WELSHMAN'S PRAISE OF WALES.
    • The Young-Man & Maidens Forecast; shewing how They Reckon'd their Chickens before they were Hatcht.
    • The Scolding WIFE.
      • [85.] A Lampoon on the Greenwich Strowlers.
      • Upon Thorough-good, an unthrift.
    • [85.] A Lampoon on the Greenwich Strowlers.
    • Upon Thorough-good, an unthrift.
    • THE UNFORTUNATE FENCER;147 or The Couragious Farmer of Gloucester-shire shewing How this huffing Spark went down into those Parts, Challenging any one at all sorts of Weapons; and at length (was) shamefully Conquer'd by a Country Farmer.
    • Come buy this new Ballad, before you doe goe; If you raile at the Author, I know what I know.
      • To his Quill.
      • [128.] Caricature of different religious sects. 1646.
        • AdamiteSeeker
        • ArminianDiuorcer
        • AnabaptistIesuit
      • AdamiteSeeker
      • ArminianDiuorcer
      • AnabaptistIesuit
    • To his Quill.
    • [128.] Caricature of different religious sects. 1646.
      • AdamiteSeeker
      • ArminianDiuorcer
      • AnabaptistIesuit
    • AdamiteSeeker
    • ArminianDiuorcer
    • AnabaptistIesuit
    • The Cruell Shrow:155 or The Patient Mans Woe
    • The Unfortunate WELCH MAN or The Untimely Death of Scotch Jockey.
    • Times Alteration
      • On a Cobler.
    • On a Cobler.
    • The humble Petition of us the Parliaments poore Souldiers in the Army of Ireland, whereof many are starved already, and many dead for want of Chirurgions.
    • Good Ale for my Money171
    • A Health to all Good-Fellowes: or The good Companions Arithmaticke.
    • The following was written in 1646, and is a satire on the then feeling of the army.
      • I.
        • II.
        • III.
        • IV.
        • V.
        • VI.
        • VII.
        • VIII.
        • IX.
        • X.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
      • VII.
      • VIII.
      • IX.
      • X.
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
      • VII.
      • VIII.
      • IX.
      • X.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • VII.
    • VIII.
    • IX.
    • X.
    • THE Merry Gossip's Vindication, To the Groats worth of good Councel Declaration.
    • the complaint of M. Tenter-hooke the Proiector, and Sir Thomas Dodger the Patentee.186
      • Sir Thomas Dodgers Answer.
    • Sir Thomas Dodgers Answer.
    • A Song in Praise of the Leather Bottel.196
    • The English Irish Souldier With his new Discipline, new Armes, old Stomacke, and new taken pillage, who had rather Eate than Fight.
    • A Leicester-shire Frolick; Or, The Valiant Cook-Maid.
      • How Jacke by playing of the Whiting got his dinner.
      • Epitaph on a Scholler.
    • How Jacke by playing of the Whiting got his dinner.
    • Epitaph on a Scholler.
    • My Wife will be my Master: or, The Married-mans Complaint against his unruly Wife.
    • Poor Robin's Prophesie, or The merry Conceited Fortune-Teller.
    • No Money, no Friend.
    • The London Ladies Vindication of Top-Knots: With the many Reasons that She shows for the Continuation of the same: As also proving Men to be as Proud as themselves.
      • BARNABIES SUMMONS: or, Paie your Groat in the Morning.
      • The WARRANT.
    • BARNABIES SUMMONS: or, Paie your Groat in the Morning.
    • The WARRANT.
    • Dead and Alive.
    • The French Dancing-Master AND THE ENGLISH SOLDIER. Or, the Difference betwixt Fidling and Fighting Displayed in a Dialogue betwixt an Englishman and a Frenchman.
      • Song.
      • The Mock.
    • Song.
    • The Mock.
    • The beggars CHORUS IN THE JOVIAL CREW.
    • The Bad-Husbands Folly or Poverty made known.
    • The Brewer.234
    • JOAN'S Ale is New;235 or:
    • Nick and Froth; or The Good-fellows Complaint for want of full Measure.
      • A Preachment on Malt.
    • A Preachment on Malt.
    • The Country-mans new care away.
      • A Song.
    • A Song.
    • The Joviall Crew.244 or Beggars-Bush.
    • On the syllable Con.
    • APPENDIX. BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCE TO THE SOURCES WHENCE THIS BOOK WAS COMPILED.
    • SOME OF THE TUNES noted in this Book.
      • Sir Eglamore. See p. 9.
      • Come Lasses and Lads. See p. 23.
      • Sellenger's Round. See p. 68.
      • Dumb, Dumb, Dumb. See p. 99.
      • Sawney and Jockey. See p. 116.
      • Stingo; or, the Oyle of Barley. See p. 124, p. 276.
      • Pegge of Ramsay; or, Watton Town's End. See p. 142.
      • Upon a Summer's Day. See p. 159.
      • Shall I lye beyond thee? or, Lulle me beyond thee. See p. 207.
      • The Spinning Wheel. See p. 241.
      • Cuckolds all a Row. See p. 255.
      • The Leather Bottel. See p. 312, p. 343.
      • Ragged and Torn. See p. 327.
      • There was a Jovial Beggar. See p. 386.
      • Ioan's Ale is New. See p. 399.
      • Love will find out the way. See p. 417.
      • The Joviall Crew; or, A Beggar, a Beggar, a Beggar I'll be. See p. 424.
        • Transcriber's Note:
      • Transcriber's Note:
    • Sir Eglamore. See p. 9.
    • Come Lasses and Lads. See p. 23.
    • Sellenger's Round. See p. 68.
    • Dumb, Dumb, Dumb. See p. 99.
    • Sawney and Jockey. See p. 116.
    • Stingo; or, the Oyle of Barley. See p. 124, p. 276.
    • Pegge of Ramsay; or, Watton Town's End. See p. 142.
    • Upon a Summer's Day. See p. 159.
    • Shall I lye beyond thee? or, Lulle me beyond thee. See p. 207.
    • The Spinning Wheel. See p. 241.
    • Cuckolds all a Row. See p. 255.
    • The Leather Bottel. See p. 312, p. 343.
    • Ragged and Torn. See p. 327.
    • There was a Jovial Beggar. See p. 386.
    • Ioan's Ale is New. See p. 399.
    • Love will find out the way. See p. 417.
    • The Joviall Crew; or, A Beggar, a Beggar, a Beggar I'll be. See p. 424.
      • Transcriber's Note:
    • Transcriber's Note:
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