Memoirs of the life, exile, and conversations of the Emperor Napoleon. (Vol. II)
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Memoirs of the life, exile, and conversations of the Emperor Napoleon. (Vol. II)

By Emmanuel-Auguste-Dieudonné Las Cases
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Table of Contents
  • MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE, EXILE, AND CONVERSATIONS, OF THE EMPEROR NAPOLEON.
  • THE TWO EMPRESSES.—THE PRINCESS PAULINE.—ELOQUENT EFFUSION OF THE EMPEROR.
    • INSULT TO THE EMPEROR AND THE PRINCE OF WALES.—EXECUTION OF NEY.—ESCAPE OF LAVALETTE.
    • MESSAGE FOR THE PRINCE REGENT.
    • SPIRIT OF THE INHABITANTS OF THE ISLE OF FRANCE.
    • HIS INTENTIONS RESPECTING ROME.—HORRIBLE FOOD.—BRITANNICUS.
    • CATILINE’S CONSPIRACY.—THE GRACCHI.—HISTORIANS.—SLEEP DURING A BATTLE.—CÆSAR AND HIS COMMENTARIES OF DIFFERENT MILITARY SYSTEMS.
    • DAYS AT LONGWOOD.—TRIAL OF DROUOT.—MILITARY CHARACTERS.—SOULT.—MASSENA.—THE EMPEROR’S COMRADES IN THE ARTILLERY—HIS NAME THOUGHT BY HIM TO BE UNKNOWN TO SOME PEOPLE, EVEN IN PARIS.
    • POLITICAL EXAMINATION OF CONSCIENCE.—FAITHFUL STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION AND PROSPERITY OF THE EMPIRE.—LIBERAL IDEAS OF THE EMPEROR ON THE INDIFFERENCE OF PARTIES.—MARMONT.—MURAT.—BERTHIER.
    • CHANCE OF DANGER IN BATTLE, &C.—THE BULLETINS
    • UNHEALTHINESS OF THE ISLAND.
    • REMARKS OF THE EMPEROR ON HIS EXPEDITION IN THE EAST.
    • SUMMARY OF THE LAST NINE MONTHS.
    • DESCRIPTION OF THE EMPEROR’S APARTMENTS.—MINUTE DETAILS OF HIS TOILET AND DRESS.—ABSURD REPORTS RESPECTING HIM.—CONSPIRACIES OF GEORGES AND CERACHI.—ATTEMPT OF THE FANATIC OF SCHÖNBRUNN.
    • MEASURES THAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN ADOPTED AFTER THE BATTLE OF WATERLOO.
    • CHARACTERISTIC TRAITS.
    • POLITICS.—THE STATE OF EUROPE.—IRRESISTIBLE ASCENDANCY OF LIBERAL OPINIONS.
    • THE EMPEROR’S OPINION OF SEVERAL CELEBRATED MEN.—POZZO DI BORGO—METTERNICH—BASSANO—CLARKE—CAMBACÉRÈS—LEBRUN—FOUCHÉ, &C.
    • PAPERS FROM EUROPE.—POLITICAL REFLECTIONS.
    • THE GOVERNOR’S ARRIVAL.
    • THE EMPEROR’S PROGRESS IN LEARNING ENGLISH.
    • THE GOVERNOR’S FIRST VISIT.—DECLARATION REQUIRED FROM US.
    • CHARACTERISTIC CONVERSATION.—THE EMPEROR’S RETURN FROM ELBA FORESEEN AT THE TIME OF HIS DEPARTURE FROM FONTAINEBLEAU.—THE GOVERNOR’S INTRODUCTION.—MORTIFICATION EXPERIENCED BY THE ADMIRAL.—OUR CAUSES OF COMPLAINT AGAINST HIM.—DESCRIPTION OF SIR HUDSON LOWE.
    • CONVENTION OF THE SOVEREIGNS RESPECTING NAPOLEON.—REMARKABLE OBSERVATIONS.
    • CONVENTION BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN, AUSTRIA, PRUSSIA, AND RUSSIA.—Signed at Paris, August 20th, 1815.
    • THE DECLARATION REQUIRED FROM US BY THE GOVERNOR.
    • FAREWELL VISIT OF THE LATE GOVERNOR.—INTERESTING CONVERSATION.—REMARK OF AN OLD ENGLISH SOLDIER.
    • THE EMPEROR’S MESSAGE TO THE PRINCE REGENT.—CHARACTERISTIC REMARKS.—PORTFOLIO LOST AT WATERLOO.—ON AMBASSADORS.—M. DE NARBONNE.—NAPOLEON ON THE POINT OF BEING TAKEN PRISONER IN GERMANY AFTER THE BATTLE OF MOSCOW.—COST OF THE EMPEROR’S TOILET.—EXPENSE OF A FAMILY ESTABLISHMENT IN THE DIFFERENT CAPITALS OF EUROPE.—THE FURNISHING OF NAPOLEON’S HOUSE IN THE RUE DE LA VICTOIRE.—THE FITTING UP OF THE IMPERIAL PALACES.—THE EMPEROR’S METHOD OF EXAMINING HIS ACCOUNTS.
    • THE GOVERNOR’S VISIT TO MY APARTMENT.—CRITIQUE ON VOLTAIRE’S MAHOMET.—REMARKS ON THE MAHOMET OF HISTORY.—GRETRY.
    • MY VISIT TO PLANTATION HOUSE.—SIR HUDSON LOWE’S INSINUATIONS.—HIS FIRST ILL-NATURED TRICK.—NAPOLEON’S PROCLAMATIONS.—HIS POLICY IN EGYPT.—HIS CONFESSION OF AN ILLEGAL ACT.
    • THE FIRST INSULT, AND THE FIRST INSTANCE OF CRUELTY, ON THE PART OF THE GOVERNOR.—CHARACTERISTIC TRAITS.
    • THE ABBÉ DE PRADT, AND HIS EMBASSY TO WARSAW. THE RUSSIAN WAR.—ITS ORIGIN.
    • THE EMPEROR INDISPOSED.—HIS FIRST DAY OF COMPLETE SECLUSION.—THE PERSIAN AND TURKISH AMBASSADORS.—ANECDOTES.
    • SECOND DAY OF SECLUSION.—THE EMPEROR RECEIVES THE GOVERNOR IN HIS CHAMBER.—CHARACTERISTIC CONVERSATION.
    • THIRD DAY OF THE EMPEROR’S SECLUSION.—SUMMARY OF HIS HISTORY.
    • FOURTH DAY OF ABSOLUTE SECLUSION.—THE MONITEUR FAVOURABLE TO THE EMPEROR.
    • FIFTH DAY’S SECLUSION.
    • SIXTH DAY OF SECLUSION.
    • ON CHINA AND RUSSIA.—RESEMBLANCE BETWEEN THE TWO GREAT REVOLUTIONS IN FRANCE AND ENGLAND.
    • EXPLANATION WITH DR. O’MEARA.—THE CONSULATE.—OPINION OF THE EMIGRANTS RESPECTING THE CONSUL.—THE EMPEROR’S INTENTIONS WITH REGARD TO EMIGRANT PROPERTY.—CONCURRENCE OF FORTUNATE CIRCUMSTANCES IN THE EMPEROR’S CAREER.—OPINION OF THE ITALIANS RESPECTING NAPOLEON.—HIS CORONATION BY THE POPE.—EFFECT OF THE CONFERENCES AT TILSIT.—THE SPANISH BOURBONS.—ARRIVAL OF THE FAMOUS WOODEN PALACE.
    • THE ILIAD.—HOMER.
    • CHARACTERISTIC REMARKS MADE BY THE EMPEROR.
    • REMARKS ON HOCHE AND VARIOUS OTHER GENERALS.
    • RIDICULOUS INVITATION SENT BY SIR HUDSON LOWE.
    • NAPOLEON AT THE INSTITUTE.—AT THE COUNCIL OF STATE.—THE CIVIL CODE.—MESSAGE TO LORD ST. VINCENT.—ON THE INTERIOR OF AFRICA.—THE MARINE DEPARTMENT.—DECRÉS.
    • DANGEROUS ILLNESS OF MY SON.—REMARKABLE OBSERVATIONS.—THE DICTIONARY OF WEATHERCOCKS.—BERTHOLET.
    • RECEPTION OF THE PASSENGERS IN THE BENGAL FLEET.
    • EQUALITY OF PUNISHMENTS.—THE EMPEROR REQUIRES ME TO GIVE HIM A DETAILED HISTORY OF MY ATLAS.
    • THE GOVERNOR’S VISIT.—HIS CONVERSATION WITH THE EMPEROR.
    • MADAME MARSHAL LEFEVRE.
    • THE GOVERNOR OF JAVA.—DOCTOR WARDEN.—FAMILIAR CONVERSATION OF THE EMPEROR RELATIVE TO HIS FAMILY.
    • THE EMPEROR SLEEPING.—MORAL REFLECTIONS.
    • THE GOVERNOR ARRESTS ONE OF OUR SERVANTS.—THE BIBLE.
    • INSTANCES OF THE CAPRICE OF AUTHORITY—PRINCESS STEPHANIE OF BADEN, &C.
    • THE EMPEROR’S MAXIMS WITH RESPECT TO SOVEREIGNTY.—THE EXPULSION OF PORTALIS FROM THE COUNCIL OF STATE.—ACCIDENTS WHICH OCCURRED TO THE EMPEROR AT ST. CLOUD, AUXONNE, AND MARLY.
    • POLITICAL REFLECTIONS.
    • VOLTAIRE’S BRUTUS.
    • FRENCH COLONY ON THE BANKS OF THE RIVER ST. LAWRENCE.—THE EMPEROR MIGHT HAVE PROCEEDED TO AMERICA.—CARNOT AT THE TIME OF THE ABDICATION.
    • STATE OF FRENCH MANUFACTURES.—ON PHYSIOGNOMY.
    • MARKS OF RESPECT SHEWN TO THE EMPEROR BY THE ENGLISH SOLDIERS.
    • CORSICA.—REMARK MADE BY PAOLI.—MAGNANIMOUS CONDUCT OF MADAME MÉRE.—LUCIEN INTENDED TO BE GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF CORSICA.—THE FIRST CONSUL’S COURT.—MADAME DE CHEVREUSE.—THE EMPEROR RECEIVES A LETTER FROM HIS MOTHER.
    • MOREAU, GEORGES, AND PICHEGRU.—DIFFERENCE OF OPINION PRODUCED BY THEIR CONSPIRACY IN THE CAMP OF BOULOGNE AND IN PARIS.
    • CONVERSATION RESPECTING THE SITUATION OF ENGLAND.—LETTERS DETAINED BY THE GOVERNOR.—CHARACTERISTIC OBSERVATIONS.
    • VOLTAIRE.—JEAN JACQUES ROUSSEAU.—CHARACTERISTIC DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE ENGLISH AND THE FRENCH NATIONS.—M. DE CHATEAUBRIAND.—HIS SPEECH AT THE INSTITUTE.—AFFECTED ANGER OF THE EMPEROR ON SEVERAL OCCASIONS.—HIS PRINCIPLES ON THAT HEAD.
    • REFLECTIONS ON THE GOVERNOR.—EXPENSES OF THE EMPEROR’S HOUSEHOLD AT THE TUILERIES.—OF A GOOD SYSTEM OF FINANCE.—MESSRS. MOLLIEN AND LABOUILLERIE.
    • ON WOMEN, &C.—POLYGAMY.
    • THE EMPEROR RESUMES THE DICTATION OF HIS MEMOIRS, &C.
    • MILITARY SCHOOLS.—PLAN OF EDUCATION PRESCRIBED BY THE EMPEROR.—HIS INTENTIONS IN BEHALF OF VETERANS.—CHANGES INTRODUCED IN THE MANNERS OF THE CAPITAL.
    • REPUGNANCE TO PHYSIC.—GIL BLAS.—GENERAL BIZANET.—HEROIC DEEDS OF FRENCH VALOUR.—REFLECTIONS, &C.
    • THE EMPEROR’S IMAGINARY PLANS FOR THE FUTURE.—NAPOLEON LITTLE KNOWN EVEN BY HIS HOUSEHOLD—HIS RELIGIOUS OPINIONS.
    • PORTRAIT OF THE DIRECTORS.—ANECDOTES.—18TH FRUCTIDOR.
    • ENGLISH DIPLOMACY.—LORD WHITWORTH.—CHATHAM.—CASTLEREAGH.—CORNWALLIS.—FOX, &C.
    • HISTORY OF THE CONVENTION BY LACRETELLE.—STATISTICAL NOTICE OF THE OXEN OF THE ISLAND.—PUNS.—STATISTICS IN GENERAL.
    • CHARACTERS. BAILLI, LAFAYETTE, MONGES, GRÉGOIRE, &C.—ST. DOMINGO.—SYSTEM TO BE FOLLOWED.—DICTATIONS ON THE CONVENTION.
    • NOTE I.
    • NOTE II.
    • THE MONITEUR AND LIBERTY OF THE PRESS.
    • THE WAR, AND ROYAL FAMILY OF SPAIN.—FERDINAND AT VALENCEY.—ERRORS IN THE AFFAIRS OF SPAIN.—HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THESE EVENTS, &C.—NAPOLEON’S ADMIRABLE LETTER TO MURAT.
    • ARTICLES SENT FROM ENGLAND.—THE EMPEROR’s DETERMINATION TO PROHIBIT THE USE OF COTTON IN FRANCE.—THE CONFERENCES OF TILSIT.—THE QUEEN OF PRUSSIA.—THE KING.—THE EMPEROR ALEXANDER.—ANECDOTES, &C.
    • ARRIVAL OF THE FOREIGN COMMISSIONERS.—FORCED ETIQUETTE OF NAPOLEON.—ANECDOTES.—COUNCIL OF STATE; DETAILS RESPECTING THE PLACE OF MEETING, CUSTOMS, &C.—NOTICE OF SOME SITTINGS; DIGRESSION.—GASSENDI.—THE CROAT REGIMENT.—AMBASSADORS.—THE NATIONAL GUARD.—THE UNIVERSITY, &C.
    • RECOLLECTIONS OF WATERLOO.
    • DEPARTURE OF THE NORTHUMBERLAND.—ON THE INTRODUCTION AND FORM GIVEN TO THE CAMPAIGNS OF ITALY.—THE RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN, BY AN AIDE-DE-CAMP OF THE VICEROY’S.
    • PROPHETIC REMARKS.—LORD HOLLAND.—THE PRINCESS CHARLOTTE OF WALES.—CONVERSATION RELATING TO MYSELF.
    • ARRIVAL OF THE LIBRARY.—HORNEMANN’S TESTIMONY IN FAVOUR OF GENERAL BONAPARTE.
    • ON MEMORY.—TRADE.—NAPOLEON’S IDEAS AND PLANS ON SEVERAL POINTS OF POLITICAL ECONOMY.
    • ARTILLERY.—ITS USE.—ITS DEFECTS.—OLD SCHOOLS.
    • CAMPAIGN OF ITALY.—THE EMPEROR’S OPINION OF GENERAL
    • ANNOYANCE FROM RATS.—LORD CASTLEREAGH’S IMPOSTURES.—FRENCH HEIRESSES.
    • THE GOVERNOR’S STATEMENTS RESPECTING THE EXPENSES AT LONGWOOD, &C.
    • POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE COURT OF LONDON DURING OUR EMIGRATION.—GEORGE III.—MR. PITT.—THE PRINCE OF WALES.—ANECDOTES.—THE NASSAUS.—REMARKABLE DIGRESSION OF NAPOLEON TO HIS OWN HISTORY.
    • MY SON’S FALL FROM HIS HORSE.—PILLAGE IN WAR.—CHARACTER OF THE FRENCH SOLDIER.—PARTICULARS RELATING TO WATERLOO, BY THE NEW ADMIRAL.
    • ANECDOTES ON THE 18TH BRUMAIRE.—SIEYES.—GRAND
    • FRESH AGGRAVATIONS FROM THE GOVERNOR.—HIS ABSURDITIES.
    • NEW VEXATIONS.—THE EMPEROR SELDOM STIRS OUT.—TRISTAN.—LA FONTAINE’S FABLES.—THE BELLY RULES THE WORLD.—DIFFICULTY OF JUDGING OF MEN.
    • MARSHAL LANNES.—MURAT AND HIS WIFE, &C.
  • SUMMARY OF THE THREE MONTHS OF APRIL, MAY, AND JUNE.
  • Footnotes
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