My Fifteen Lost Years
Mrs. Maybrick's Own Story
Free

My Fifteen Lost Years Mrs. Maybrick's Own Story

By Florence Elizabeth Maybrick
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • MY FIFTEEN LOST YEARS
  • CONTENTS
  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
  • FOREWORD
    • Sketch of My Ancestry
  • CHAPTER ONE Before the Trial
    • My Arrest
    • A Prisoner in My Own House
    • At Walton Jail
    • Alone
    • The Coroner’s Inquest
    • A Plank for a Bed
    • The Verdict of the Coroner’s Jury
    • The Doctors Disagree
    • Letters from Walton Jail
    • Lord Russell’s Opinion
    • The Public Condemns Me Unheard
  • CHAPTER TWO The Trial
    • The Injustice of Trying the Case at Liverpool
    • An Unexpected Verdict
    • The Judge’s Sentence
    • In the Shadow of Death
    • Commutation of Sentence
  • CHAPTER THREE In Solitary Confinement
    • Removal to Woking Prison
    • The Convict Uniform
    • In Solitary Confinement
    • The Daily Routine
    • The Exercise Hour
    • The Midday Meal
    • The Cruelty of Solitary Confinement
  • CHAPTER FOUR The Period of Probation
    • A Change of Cell
    • Evils of the Silent System
    • Insanity and Nervous Breakdown of Prisoners
    • Need of Separate Confinement for the Weak-Minded
    • Reading an Insufficient Relaxation
    • My Sufferings from Cold and Insomnia
    • Medical Attendance
    • Added Sufferings of the Delicately Nurtured
    • How Criminals and Imbeciles are Made
  • CHAPTER FIVE The Period of Hard Labor
    • Routine
    • Talk with the Chaplain
    • My Work in the Kitchen
    • The Machine-made Menu
    • Diet for Female Convicts
    • Visitors to the Kitchen
    • The “Homelike” Cell
    • The Opiate of Acquiescence
    • Visits of Prisoners’ Friends
    • My Mother’s Visits
    • A Letter from Lord Russell
    • Punished for Another’s Fault
    • Forms of Punishment
    • The True Aim of Punishment
    • The Evil of Collective Punishment
    • The Evil of Constant Supervision
    • Some Good Points of Convict Prisons
    • My Sickness
    • Taken to the Infirmary
    • The Utter Desolation of a Sick Prisoner
  • CHAPTER SIX At Aylesbury Prison
    • Removal from Woking
    • New Insignia of Shame
    • Arrival at Aylesbury Prison
    • A New Prison Régime
    • The Board of Visitors
    • Regulations Concerning Letters and Visits
    • A Visit from Lord Russell
  • CHAPTER SEVEN A Petition for Release
    • Denied by the Secretary of State
    • Report of My Misconduct Refuted
    • Need of a Court of Criminal Appeal
    • Historic Examples of British Injustice
    • The Case of Adolf Beck
  • CHAPTER EIGHT Religion in Prison Life
    • Dedication of New Chapel
    • Influence of Religion upon Prisoners
    • Suicide of a Prisoner
    • Tragedies in Prison
    • Moral Effect of Harsh Prison Regime
    • Attacks of Levity
    • Self-Discipline
    • Need of Women Doctors and Inspectors
    • Chastening Effect of Imprisonment on the Spirit
    • A Death-bed Incident
  • CHAPTER NINE My Last Years in Prison
    • I am Set to Work in the Library
    • Newspapers Forbidden
    • How Prisoners Learn of Great Events
    • Strict Discipline of Prison Officers
    • Their High Character
    • Nervous Strain of Their Duties
    • Standing Orders for Warders
    • Crime a Mental Disease
    • Something Good in the Worst Criminal
    • Need of Further Prison Reform
  • CHAPTER TEN My Release
    • I Learn the Time When My Sentence Will Terminate
    • The Dawn of Liberty
    • The Release
    • In Retreat at Truro
    • I Come to America
    • My Lost Years
  • PART TWO ANALYSIS OF THE MAYBRICK CASE
  • Introduction
    • Petitions for a Reprieve
    • Illogical Position of Home Secretary
    • New Evidence of Innocence Ignored
    • Lord Russell’s Letter
    • Efforts for Release
    • Even New Evidence Superfluous
    • The Doctors’ Doubt
    • Public Surprise at Verdict
    • Character of Jury
    • The “Mad Judge”
    • Justice Stephen’s Biased Charge
    • Lord Russell’s Memorandum Quashed
    • Repeated Protests of Lord Russell
    • The American Official Petition
    • Secretary Blaine’s Letter to Minister Lincoln
    • Henry W. Lucy on Lord Russell
    • Lord Russell’s Conviction of Mrs. Maybrick’s Innocence
    • Explanation of Attitude of Home Secretaries
    • Upholding the Justiciary
    • Need of Court of Criminal Appeal
  • THE BRIEF OF MESSRS. LUMLEY & LUMLEY
    • Opinion—Re F. E. Maybrick
    • Justice Stephen’s Misdirections
    • Misdirection as to Mr. Maybrick’s Symptoms
    • Misdirection as to Mrs. Maybrick’s Access to Poisons
    • Misdirection as to “Traces” of Arsenic
    • Misdirection as to Arsenic in Solution
    • Mr. Clayton’s Experiments
    • Misdirection as to Arsenic in Glycerin
    • Misdirection as to Evidence of Physicians
    • Misdirection as to Times When Arsenic May Have Been Administered
    • Misdirection as to Mrs. Maybrick’s Changing Medicine Bottles
    • Misdirection as to Administration With Intent to Kill
    • Exclusion of Prisoner’s Testimony
    • Misdirection as to Identity of Meat-Juice Bottle
    • Misdirection in Excluding Corroboration of Prisoner’s Statement
    • Misdirections to Jury to Draw Illegal Inferences
    • Misdirections Regarding the Medical Testimony
    • Conflict of Medical Opinion
    • Misdirections as to Cause of Death
    • Misdirection to Ignore Medical Testimony
    • Misreception of Evidence
    • Cruel Misstatement by the Coroner
    • Medical Evidence for the Prosecution
    • Maybrick Died a Natural Death
    • The Chief Witness for the Prosecution
    • Medical Evidence for Defense
    • A Toxicological Study
    • The Medical Weakness of the Prosecution
    • The Administration Of Arsenic
    • The Fly-paper Episode
    • How Mrs. Maybrick Accounts for The Fly-Papers
    • Administration of Arsenic not Proved
    • Intent to Murder not Proved
    • Absence of Concealment by Prisoner
    • Some Important Deductions from Medical Testimony
    • Symptoms Due to Poisonous Drugs
    • Death from Natural Causes
    • Prosecution’s Deductions from Post-mortem Analysis Misleading
    • Recapitulation Of Legal Points
  • Mrs. Maybrick’s Own Analysis Of The Meat-Juice Incident
  • MEMORIALS FOR RESPITE OF SENTENCE
    • From the Physicians of Liverpool
    • From the Bars of Liverpool and London
    • From Citizens of Liverpool
  • NEW EVIDENCE
    • Arsenic Sold to Maybrick by Druggist
    • Arsenic Supplied to Maybrick by Manufacturing Chemist
    • Depositions as to Mr. Maybrick’s Arsenic Habit
    • Justice Stephen’s Retirement
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