The Childrens' Story of the War, Volume 2 (of 10) From the Battle of Mons to the Fall of Antwerp.
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The Childrens' Story of the War, Volume 2 (of 10) From the Battle of Mons to the Fall of Antwerp.

By Edward Parrott
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Book Description

Table of Contents
  • British Soldiers crossing the Aisne. (See page 244.)
    • THE
  • CHILDREN'S STORY
  • OF THE WAR
    • by
    • SIR EDWARD PARROTT, M.A., LL.D.
      • AUTHOR OF "BRITAIN OVERSEAS," "THE PAGEANT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE," ETC.
      • From the Battle of Mons to the Fall of Antwerp.
    • AUTHOR OF "BRITAIN OVERSEAS," "THE PAGEANT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE," ETC.
    • From the Battle of Mons to the Fall of Antwerp.
    • THOMAS NELSON AND SONS
      • LONDON, EDINBURGH, DUBLIN, AND NEW YORK
    • LONDON, EDINBURGH, DUBLIN, AND NEW YORK
    • CONTENTS
    • CHAPTER I.
      • THE FRENCH ARMY.
        • Recruits in the Streets of Paris.    Photo, Sport and General.
        • Cuirassiers leaving Paris.    Photo, Central News.
        • Infantry of the Line leaving Paris.    Photo, The Sphere.
        • Arab Cavalry (Spahis) at the Front.    Photo, Underwood and Underwood.
      • Recruits in the Streets of Paris.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • Cuirassiers leaving Paris.    Photo, Central News.
      • Infantry of the Line leaving Paris.    Photo, The Sphere.
      • Arab Cavalry (Spahis) at the Front.    Photo, Underwood and Underwood.
    • THE FRENCH ARMY.
      • Recruits in the Streets of Paris.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • Cuirassiers leaving Paris.    Photo, Central News.
      • Infantry of the Line leaving Paris.    Photo, The Sphere.
      • Arab Cavalry (Spahis) at the Front.    Photo, Underwood and Underwood.
    • Recruits in the Streets of Paris.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • Cuirassiers leaving Paris.    Photo, Central News.
    • Infantry of the Line leaving Paris.    Photo, The Sphere.
    • Arab Cavalry (Spahis) at the Front.    Photo, Underwood and Underwood.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • THE FIRST CLASH OF ARMS.
        • The Battle of Dinant, August 15, 1914. French infantry recapturing the town.
        • Plan of Namur Forts.
        • Map showing Position of Armies.
      • The Battle of Dinant, August 15, 1914. French infantry recapturing the town.
      • Plan of Namur Forts.
      • Map showing Position of Armies.
    • THE FIRST CLASH OF ARMS.
      • The Battle of Dinant, August 15, 1914. French infantry recapturing the town.
      • Plan of Namur Forts.
      • Map showing Position of Armies.
    • The Battle of Dinant, August 15, 1914. French infantry recapturing the town.
    • Plan of Namur Forts.
    • Map showing Position of Armies.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • THE FALL OF NAMUR.
        • The Town of Mons.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
        • Map showing British and French Positions at the Battles of Mons and Charleroi.
        • The Siege of Namur.
        • Charge of the Turcos near Charleroi.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
      • The Town of Mons.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • Map showing British and French Positions at the Battles of Mons and Charleroi.
      • The Siege of Namur.
      • Charge of the Turcos near Charleroi.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
    • THE FALL OF NAMUR.
      • The Town of Mons.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • Map showing British and French Positions at the Battles of Mons and Charleroi.
      • The Siege of Namur.
      • Charge of the Turcos near Charleroi.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
    • The Town of Mons.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
    • Map showing British and French Positions at the Battles of Mons and Charleroi.
    • The Siege of Namur.
    • Charge of the Turcos near Charleroi.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • THE BATTLE OF MONS.
        • The British in their Trenches at Mons.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
      • The British in their Trenches at Mons.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
    • THE BATTLE OF MONS.
      • The British in their Trenches at Mons.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
    • The British in their Trenches at Mons.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • SOLDIERS' STORIES OF THE BATTLE OF MONS.
        • Holding the Canal at Mons.    By permission of The Sphere.
        • In the Trenches—waiting for an Attack.    Photopress.
        • The Victoria Cross.
      • Holding the Canal at Mons.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • In the Trenches—waiting for an Attack.    Photopress.
      • The Victoria Cross.
      • Lance-Corporal Jarvis preparing to destroy a Bridge.
        • Drawn by Ernest Prater from a rough sketch by Lance-Corporal Jarvis.
        • Engineers destroy a bridge such as the above by fixing one or more slabs of gun-cotton in close contact with it. Wires are attached to the gun-cotton, and by means of electricity the charge is fired. The engineers must calculate the amount of gun-cotton required, and choose the most suitable position for fixing the charge, so that the explosion may have the desired effect.
      • Drawn by Ernest Prater from a rough sketch by Lance-Corporal Jarvis.
      • Engineers destroy a bridge such as the above by fixing one or more slabs of gun-cotton in close contact with it. Wires are attached to the gun-cotton, and by means of electricity the charge is fired. The engineers must calculate the amount of gun-cotton required, and choose the most suitable position for fixing the charge, so that the explosion may have the desired effect.
    • SOLDIERS' STORIES OF THE BATTLE OF MONS.
      • Holding the Canal at Mons.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • In the Trenches—waiting for an Attack.    Photopress.
      • The Victoria Cross.
    • Holding the Canal at Mons.    By permission of The Sphere.
    • In the Trenches—waiting for an Attack.    Photopress.
    • The Victoria Cross.
    • Lance-Corporal Jarvis preparing to destroy a Bridge.
      • Drawn by Ernest Prater from a rough sketch by Lance-Corporal Jarvis.
      • Engineers destroy a bridge such as the above by fixing one or more slabs of gun-cotton in close contact with it. Wires are attached to the gun-cotton, and by means of electricity the charge is fired. The engineers must calculate the amount of gun-cotton required, and choose the most suitable position for fixing the charge, so that the explosion may have the desired effect.
    • Drawn by Ernest Prater from a rough sketch by Lance-Corporal Jarvis.
    • Engineers destroy a bridge such as the above by fixing one or more slabs of gun-cotton in close contact with it. Wires are attached to the gun-cotton, and by means of electricity the charge is fired. The engineers must calculate the amount of gun-cotton required, and choose the most suitable position for fixing the charge, so that the explosion may have the desired effect.
    • CHAPTER VI
      • THE RUSSIAN PEOPLE.
      • Polish Soldiers of the old days crossing the River Dneister.
        • (From the picture by the Polish artist Juliusz Kossak.)
      • (From the picture by the Polish artist Juliusz Kossak.)
    • THE RUSSIAN PEOPLE.
    • Polish Soldiers of the old days crossing the River Dneister.
      • (From the picture by the Polish artist Juliusz Kossak.)
    • (From the picture by the Polish artist Juliusz Kossak.)
    • CHAPTER VII.
      • THE RUSSIAN ARMY.
        • Cossacks on Active Service.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
        • Russian Infantry at a Review.    Photo, Topical Press.
        • Russian Artillery.    Photo, Record Press.
      • Cossacks on Active Service.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • Russian Infantry at a Review.    Photo, Topical Press.
      • Russian Artillery.    Photo, Record Press.
    • THE RUSSIAN ARMY.
      • Cossacks on Active Service.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • Russian Infantry at a Review.    Photo, Topical Press.
      • Russian Artillery.    Photo, Record Press.
    • Cossacks on Active Service.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • Russian Infantry at a Review.    Photo, Topical Press.
    • Russian Artillery.    Photo, Record Press.
    • CHAPTER VIII.
      • THE EASTERN THEATRE OF WAR.
        • This picture gives you an idea of a typical landscape in Poland. Notice the difficulties which the Russians have had to overcome in bringing up food and ammunition to their armies. Photo, Daily Mirror.
        • The Polish Theatre of War.
        • Insterburg.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
        • Russian Troops entraining for the Frontier.    Photo, Record Press.
      • This picture gives you an idea of a typical landscape in Poland. Notice the difficulties which the Russians have had to overcome in bringing up food and ammunition to their armies. Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • The Polish Theatre of War.
      • Insterburg.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • Russian Troops entraining for the Frontier.    Photo, Record Press.
    • THE EASTERN THEATRE OF WAR.
      • This picture gives you an idea of a typical landscape in Poland. Notice the difficulties which the Russians have had to overcome in bringing up food and ammunition to their armies. Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • The Polish Theatre of War.
      • Insterburg.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • Russian Troops entraining for the Frontier.    Photo, Record Press.
    • This picture gives you an idea of a typical landscape in Poland. Notice the difficulties which the Russians have had to overcome in bringing up food and ammunition to their armies. Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • The Polish Theatre of War.
    • Insterburg.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
    • Russian Troops entraining for the Frontier.    Photo, Record Press.
    • CHAPTER IX.
      • VICTORY AND DEFEAT.
        • The Tsar and his Commander-in-Chief, the Grand Duke Nicholas. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
        • Russian Infantry Officers saluting the Tsar.    Photo, Record Press.
        • Map showing the situation towards the end of August. Solid black oblongs show Austrians; open oblongs, Russians. C, General Ivanov's army; D, General Ruzsky's army; E, General Brussilov's army; F, 2nd Austrian Army; G, 1st Austrian Army.
        • Russian Attack on Lemberg, September 1-2.
      • The Tsar and his Commander-in-Chief, the Grand Duke Nicholas. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • Russian Infantry Officers saluting the Tsar.    Photo, Record Press.
      • Map showing the situation towards the end of August. Solid black oblongs show Austrians; open oblongs, Russians. C, General Ivanov's army; D, General Ruzsky's army; E, General Brussilov's army; F, 2nd Austrian Army; G, 1st Austrian Army.
      • Russian Attack on Lemberg, September 1-2.
    • VICTORY AND DEFEAT.
      • The Tsar and his Commander-in-Chief, the Grand Duke Nicholas. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • Russian Infantry Officers saluting the Tsar.    Photo, Record Press.
      • Map showing the situation towards the end of August. Solid black oblongs show Austrians; open oblongs, Russians. C, General Ivanov's army; D, General Ruzsky's army; E, General Brussilov's army; F, 2nd Austrian Army; G, 1st Austrian Army.
      • Russian Attack on Lemberg, September 1-2.
    • The Tsar and his Commander-in-Chief, the Grand Duke Nicholas. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • Russian Infantry Officers saluting the Tsar.    Photo, Record Press.
    • Map showing the situation towards the end of August. Solid black oblongs show Austrians; open oblongs, Russians. C, General Ivanov's army; D, General Ruzsky's army; E, General Brussilov's army; F, 2nd Austrian Army; G, 1st Austrian Army.
    • Russian Attack on Lemberg, September 1-2.
    • CHAPTER X.
      • STORIES OF RUSSIAN SOLDIERS.
        • A Russian Bayonet Charge in East Prussia. This picture represents an incident which took place on the evening of August 26, 1914, and was witnessed by an Englishman who was managing a great German estate in East Prussia when the war broke out. The Russians, as shown above, charged the German centre with the bayonet and put it to flight. The artist made this drawing under the guidance of the Englishman who actually saw the fight. (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • A Russian Bayonet Charge in East Prussia. This picture represents an incident which took place on the evening of August 26, 1914, and was witnessed by an Englishman who was managing a great German estate in East Prussia when the war broke out. The Russians, as shown above, charged the German centre with the bayonet and put it to flight. The artist made this drawing under the guidance of the Englishman who actually saw the fight. (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • STORIES OF RUSSIAN SOLDIERS.
      • A Russian Bayonet Charge in East Prussia. This picture represents an incident which took place on the evening of August 26, 1914, and was witnessed by an Englishman who was managing a great German estate in East Prussia when the war broke out. The Russians, as shown above, charged the German centre with the bayonet and put it to flight. The artist made this drawing under the guidance of the Englishman who actually saw the fight. (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • A Russian Bayonet Charge in East Prussia. This picture represents an incident which took place on the evening of August 26, 1914, and was witnessed by an Englishman who was managing a great German estate in East Prussia when the war broke out. The Russians, as shown above, charged the German centre with the bayonet and put it to flight. The artist made this drawing under the guidance of the Englishman who actually saw the fight. (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • CHAPTER XI.
      • THE FIGHTING RETREAT.
        • Bird's-eye View of the British Line of Retreat from Mons to La Fère    By permission of the Sphere.
        • The Charge of the 9th Lancers at Audregnies.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
      • Bird's-eye View of the British Line of Retreat from Mons to La Fère    By permission of the Sphere.
      • The Charge of the 9th Lancers at Audregnies.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
    • THE FIGHTING RETREAT.
      • Bird's-eye View of the British Line of Retreat from Mons to La Fère    By permission of the Sphere.
      • The Charge of the 9th Lancers at Audregnies.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
    • Bird's-eye View of the British Line of Retreat from Mons to La Fère    By permission of the Sphere.
    • The Charge of the 9th Lancers at Audregnies.    From the picture by Dudley Tennant.
    • CHAPTER XII.
      • A GLORIOUS STAND.
        • Men of the 9th Lancers saving the Guns. (See p. 88.) From the drawing by Dudley Tennant.
      • Men of the 9th Lancers saving the Guns. (See p. 88.) From the drawing by Dudley Tennant.
      • The Lonely Gunner.
        • This picture illustrates an incident during the retreat. A half-battery of the Royal Field Artillery, in a rather exposed position, greatly galled the Germans by the accuracy of its aim, and a combined attack was made on it by the enemy. One by one the British guns were silenced, and the men who had been serving them lay dead around. At last one man alone was left, and he went on working the gun steadily and calmly until he was called away by an officer. Similar instances of resistance to the last man abound in the history of the Royal Field Artillery.
      • This picture illustrates an incident during the retreat. A half-battery of the Royal Field Artillery, in a rather exposed position, greatly galled the Germans by the accuracy of its aim, and a combined attack was made on it by the enemy. One by one the British guns were silenced, and the men who had been serving them lay dead around. At last one man alone was left, and he went on working the gun steadily and calmly until he was called away by an officer. Similar instances of resistance to the last man abound in the history of the Royal Field Artillery.
    • A GLORIOUS STAND.
      • Men of the 9th Lancers saving the Guns. (See p. 88.) From the drawing by Dudley Tennant.
    • Men of the 9th Lancers saving the Guns. (See p. 88.) From the drawing by Dudley Tennant.
    • The Lonely Gunner.
      • This picture illustrates an incident during the retreat. A half-battery of the Royal Field Artillery, in a rather exposed position, greatly galled the Germans by the accuracy of its aim, and a combined attack was made on it by the enemy. One by one the British guns were silenced, and the men who had been serving them lay dead around. At last one man alone was left, and he went on working the gun steadily and calmly until he was called away by an officer. Similar instances of resistance to the last man abound in the history of the Royal Field Artillery.
    • This picture illustrates an incident during the retreat. A half-battery of the Royal Field Artillery, in a rather exposed position, greatly galled the Germans by the accuracy of its aim, and a combined attack was made on it by the enemy. One by one the British guns were silenced, and the men who had been serving them lay dead around. At last one man alone was left, and he went on working the gun steadily and calmly until he was called away by an officer. Similar instances of resistance to the last man abound in the history of the Royal Field Artillery.
    • CHAPTER XIII.
      • "THE MOST CRITICAL DAY OF ALL."
        • General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien, G.C.B., D.S.O.    Photo, Russell. Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien commanded the Second Army Corps during the retreat from Mons. Sir John French, in his dispatch of September 7, ascribed to him the salvation of the left wing of the British army, and described him as "a commander of rare and unusual coolness, intrepidity, and determination." Had the left wing been rolled up, the rout of the whole Allied army would probably have followed.
        • How the Guards held Landrecies on the night of August 25, 1914. A description of this incident is given on pp. 93 and 94. As a result of this magnificent defence the German vanguard was checked. "It had miscalculated the strength of British valour and endurance."
      • General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien, G.C.B., D.S.O.    Photo, Russell. Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien commanded the Second Army Corps during the retreat from Mons. Sir John French, in his dispatch of September 7, ascribed to him the salvation of the left wing of the British army, and described him as "a commander of rare and unusual coolness, intrepidity, and determination." Had the left wing been rolled up, the rout of the whole Allied army would probably have followed.
      • How the Guards held Landrecies on the night of August 25, 1914. A description of this incident is given on pp. 93 and 94. As a result of this magnificent defence the German vanguard was checked. "It had miscalculated the strength of British valour and endurance."
    • "THE MOST CRITICAL DAY OF ALL."
      • General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien, G.C.B., D.S.O.    Photo, Russell. Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien commanded the Second Army Corps during the retreat from Mons. Sir John French, in his dispatch of September 7, ascribed to him the salvation of the left wing of the British army, and described him as "a commander of rare and unusual coolness, intrepidity, and determination." Had the left wing been rolled up, the rout of the whole Allied army would probably have followed.
      • How the Guards held Landrecies on the night of August 25, 1914. A description of this incident is given on pp. 93 and 94. As a result of this magnificent defence the German vanguard was checked. "It had miscalculated the strength of British valour and endurance."
    • General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien, G.C.B., D.S.O.    Photo, Russell. Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien commanded the Second Army Corps during the retreat from Mons. Sir John French, in his dispatch of September 7, ascribed to him the salvation of the left wing of the British army, and described him as "a commander of rare and unusual coolness, intrepidity, and determination." Had the left wing been rolled up, the rout of the whole Allied army would probably have followed.
    • How the Guards held Landrecies on the night of August 25, 1914. A description of this incident is given on pp. 93 and 94. As a result of this magnificent defence the German vanguard was checked. "It had miscalculated the strength of British valour and endurance."
    • CHAPTER XIV.
      • STORIES OF THE RETREAT FROM MONS TO ST. QUENTIN.
        • The City of Tournai.    Photo, Central News. The scene of the heroic stand described on page 107.
        • Ready, aye ready!    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • The City of Tournai.    Photo, Central News. The scene of the heroic stand described on page 107.
      • Ready, aye ready!    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • STORIES OF THE RETREAT FROM MONS TO ST. QUENTIN.
      • The City of Tournai.    Photo, Central News. The scene of the heroic stand described on page 107.
      • Ready, aye ready!    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • The City of Tournai.    Photo, Central News. The scene of the heroic stand described on page 107.
    • Ready, aye ready!    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • CHAPTER XV.
      • VALOROUS DEEDS AND VICTORIA CROSSES.
      • The Welsh Guards and their Regimental Colour.
        • In the British army, when war broke out, there were four regiments of foot guards—the Grenadier Guards, the Coldstream Guards, the Scots Guards, and the Irish Guards. You will notice that England, Scotland, and Ireland had their special regiments of Guards, but not Wales. This slur on the Principality has now been removed: a new regiment of Welsh Guards has been formed, and on St. David's Day (March 1, 1915) it was specially appointed to do sentry-go at Buckingham Palace, and was afterwards marched to mount guard at St. James's Palace.    Photo, London News Association.
        • British Motor Transport.    Photo, Topical Press.
        • With the Army Service Corps—horsed wagons which carry supplies to the men in the firing lines.    Photo, Photopress.
        • French Infantry retreating.    Photo, Record Press.
      • In the British army, when war broke out, there were four regiments of foot guards—the Grenadier Guards, the Coldstream Guards, the Scots Guards, and the Irish Guards. You will notice that England, Scotland, and Ireland had their special regiments of Guards, but not Wales. This slur on the Principality has now been removed: a new regiment of Welsh Guards has been formed, and on St. David's Day (March 1, 1915) it was specially appointed to do sentry-go at Buckingham Palace, and was afterwards marched to mount guard at St. James's Palace.    Photo, London News Association.
      • British Motor Transport.    Photo, Topical Press.
      • With the Army Service Corps—horsed wagons which carry supplies to the men in the firing lines.    Photo, Photopress.
      • French Infantry retreating.    Photo, Record Press.
    • VALOROUS DEEDS AND VICTORIA CROSSES.
    • The Welsh Guards and their Regimental Colour.
      • In the British army, when war broke out, there were four regiments of foot guards—the Grenadier Guards, the Coldstream Guards, the Scots Guards, and the Irish Guards. You will notice that England, Scotland, and Ireland had their special regiments of Guards, but not Wales. This slur on the Principality has now been removed: a new regiment of Welsh Guards has been formed, and on St. David's Day (March 1, 1915) it was specially appointed to do sentry-go at Buckingham Palace, and was afterwards marched to mount guard at St. James's Palace.    Photo, London News Association.
      • British Motor Transport.    Photo, Topical Press.
      • With the Army Service Corps—horsed wagons which carry supplies to the men in the firing lines.    Photo, Photopress.
      • French Infantry retreating.    Photo, Record Press.
    • In the British army, when war broke out, there were four regiments of foot guards—the Grenadier Guards, the Coldstream Guards, the Scots Guards, and the Irish Guards. You will notice that England, Scotland, and Ireland had their special regiments of Guards, but not Wales. This slur on the Principality has now been removed: a new regiment of Welsh Guards has been formed, and on St. David's Day (March 1, 1915) it was specially appointed to do sentry-go at Buckingham Palace, and was afterwards marched to mount guard at St. James's Palace.    Photo, London News Association.
    • British Motor Transport.    Photo, Topical Press.
    • With the Army Service Corps—horsed wagons which carry supplies to the men in the firing lines.    Photo, Photopress.
    • French Infantry retreating.    Photo, Record Press.
    • CHAPTER XVI.
      • ARRAS AND AMIENS.
        • The British Retreat from Mons to the Oise (Aug. 23-28).
      • The British Retreat from Mons to the Oise (Aug. 23-28).
    • ARRAS AND AMIENS.
      • The British Retreat from Mons to the Oise (Aug. 23-28).
    • The British Retreat from Mons to the Oise (Aug. 23-28).
    • CHAPTER XVII.
      • THE FRENCH RETREAT.
        • Map illustrating the Retreat of the French Armies from the Sambre and the Meuse (Aug. 22-28).
        • The German Crown Prince.
        • A View in Krupp's Works, Essen, where the Big Guns are made.    Photo, L.N.A.
        • The French Army in the Champagne Country.    Photo, Farringdon Photo Co.
        • Sketch of Defensive Line of the Heights of Champagne.
      • Map illustrating the Retreat of the French Armies from the Sambre and the Meuse (Aug. 22-28).
      • The German Crown Prince.
      • A View in Krupp's Works, Essen, where the Big Guns are made.    Photo, L.N.A.
      • The French Army in the Champagne Country.    Photo, Farringdon Photo Co.
      • Sketch of Defensive Line of the Heights of Champagne.
    • THE FRENCH RETREAT.
      • Map illustrating the Retreat of the French Armies from the Sambre and the Meuse (Aug. 22-28).
      • The German Crown Prince.
      • A View in Krupp's Works, Essen, where the Big Guns are made.    Photo, L.N.A.
      • The French Army in the Champagne Country.    Photo, Farringdon Photo Co.
      • Sketch of Defensive Line of the Heights of Champagne.
    • Map illustrating the Retreat of the French Armies from the Sambre and the Meuse (Aug. 22-28).
    • The German Crown Prince.
    • A View in Krupp's Works, Essen, where the Big Guns are made.    Photo, L.N.A.
    • The French Army in the Champagne Country.    Photo, Farringdon Photo Co.
    • Sketch of Defensive Line of the Heights of Champagne.
    • CHAPTER XVIII.
      • "THOSE TERRIBLE GREY HORSES."
        • Scots Greys on the March.    Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd. The Colonel-in-chief of the Scots Greys (2nd Dragoons) is the Tsar of Russia, who wrote to the regiment as follows: "I am happy to think that my gallant regiment, the Royal Scots Greys, are fighting with Russia against the common enemy. I am convinced that they will uphold the glorious traditions of the past."
        • The Uhlan's Last Ride. Armoured motor cars containing sharpshooters play an important part in the war. This picture shows a car giving chase to a Uhlan patrol. One man has already been laid low.
      • Scots Greys on the March.    Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd. The Colonel-in-chief of the Scots Greys (2nd Dragoons) is the Tsar of Russia, who wrote to the regiment as follows: "I am happy to think that my gallant regiment, the Royal Scots Greys, are fighting with Russia against the common enemy. I am convinced that they will uphold the glorious traditions of the past."
      • The Uhlan's Last Ride. Armoured motor cars containing sharpshooters play an important part in the war. This picture shows a car giving chase to a Uhlan patrol. One man has already been laid low.
    • "THOSE TERRIBLE GREY HORSES."
      • Scots Greys on the March.    Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd. The Colonel-in-chief of the Scots Greys (2nd Dragoons) is the Tsar of Russia, who wrote to the regiment as follows: "I am happy to think that my gallant regiment, the Royal Scots Greys, are fighting with Russia against the common enemy. I am convinced that they will uphold the glorious traditions of the past."
      • The Uhlan's Last Ride. Armoured motor cars containing sharpshooters play an important part in the war. This picture shows a car giving chase to a Uhlan patrol. One man has already been laid low.
    • Scots Greys on the March.    Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd. The Colonel-in-chief of the Scots Greys (2nd Dragoons) is the Tsar of Russia, who wrote to the regiment as follows: "I am happy to think that my gallant regiment, the Royal Scots Greys, are fighting with Russia against the common enemy. I am convinced that they will uphold the glorious traditions of the past."
    • The Uhlan's Last Ride. Armoured motor cars containing sharpshooters play an important part in the war. This picture shows a car giving chase to a Uhlan patrol. One man has already been laid low.
    • CHAPTER XIX.
      • THE STORY OF BATTERY L OF THE R.H.A.
        • Battery L of the R.H.A. "One lone gun in the dawn."
        • BATTERY L.
      • Battery L of the R.H.A. "One lone gun in the dawn."
      • BATTERY L.
    • THE STORY OF BATTERY L OF THE R.H.A.
      • Battery L of the R.H.A. "One lone gun in the dawn."
      • BATTERY L.
    • Battery L of the R.H.A. "One lone gun in the dawn."
    • BATTERY L.
    • CHAPTER XX.
      • MORE STORIES OF THE RETREAT.
        • Hard Pressed.    By permission of The Sphere. This picture illustrates an incident at La Fère during the retreat. The French, after snatching a few hours' sleep, were shelled in the gray of the dawning, and were obliged to rush hastily from their billets to resist the German onset. After taking a heavy toll of the enemy they continued their retreat.
        • A British Aviation Camp. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • Hard Pressed.    By permission of The Sphere. This picture illustrates an incident at La Fère during the retreat. The French, after snatching a few hours' sleep, were shelled in the gray of the dawning, and were obliged to rush hastily from their billets to resist the German onset. After taking a heavy toll of the enemy they continued their retreat.
      • A British Aviation Camp. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • MORE STORIES OF THE RETREAT.
      • Hard Pressed.    By permission of The Sphere. This picture illustrates an incident at La Fère during the retreat. The French, after snatching a few hours' sleep, were shelled in the gray of the dawning, and were obliged to rush hastily from their billets to resist the German onset. After taking a heavy toll of the enemy they continued their retreat.
      • A British Aviation Camp. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • Hard Pressed.    By permission of The Sphere. This picture illustrates an incident at La Fère during the retreat. The French, after snatching a few hours' sleep, were shelled in the gray of the dawning, and were obliged to rush hastily from their billets to resist the German onset. After taking a heavy toll of the enemy they continued their retreat.
    • A British Aviation Camp. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • CHAPTER XXI.
      • THE BEGINNING OF THE WAR AT SEA.
        • The Island of Heligoland. Part of the harbour is shown on the right. Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
        • Sir John Jellicoe on board his flagship, the Iron Duke.    Photo, Alfieri.
        • The Exploit of E9: the Sinking of the Hela.
        • How they kept the Flag flying.
        • The sinking of the Aboukir, Hogue, and Cressy. This illustration shows the Cressy making a gallant attempt to ram the submarine.
      • The Island of Heligoland. Part of the harbour is shown on the right. Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • Sir John Jellicoe on board his flagship, the Iron Duke.    Photo, Alfieri.
      • The Exploit of E9: the Sinking of the Hela.
      • How they kept the Flag flying.
      • The sinking of the Aboukir, Hogue, and Cressy. This illustration shows the Cressy making a gallant attempt to ram the submarine.
    • THE BEGINNING OF THE WAR AT SEA.
      • The Island of Heligoland. Part of the harbour is shown on the right. Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • Sir John Jellicoe on board his flagship, the Iron Duke.    Photo, Alfieri.
      • The Exploit of E9: the Sinking of the Hela.
      • How they kept the Flag flying.
      • The sinking of the Aboukir, Hogue, and Cressy. This illustration shows the Cressy making a gallant attempt to ram the submarine.
    • The Island of Heligoland. Part of the harbour is shown on the right. Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
    • Sir John Jellicoe on board his flagship, the Iron Duke.    Photo, Alfieri.
    • The Exploit of E9: the Sinking of the Hela.
    • How they kept the Flag flying.
    • The sinking of the Aboukir, Hogue, and Cressy. This illustration shows the Cressy making a gallant attempt to ram the submarine.
    • CHAPTER XXII.
      • THE BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT.
        • A British Destroyer in action.
        • Rear-Admiral Sir David Beatty.    Photo, Central News.
        • The Battle Cruiser Lion.    Photo, Symonds and Co.
        • Position at 7 a.m.
        • Battle of the Bight of Heligoland (Aug. 28).
        • The Sinking of the Mainz.
      • A British Destroyer in action.
      • Rear-Admiral Sir David Beatty.    Photo, Central News.
      • The Battle Cruiser Lion.    Photo, Symonds and Co.
      • Position at 7 a.m.
      • Battle of the Bight of Heligoland (Aug. 28).
      • The Sinking of the Mainz.
    • THE BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT.
      • A British Destroyer in action.
      • Rear-Admiral Sir David Beatty.    Photo, Central News.
      • The Battle Cruiser Lion.    Photo, Symonds and Co.
      • Position at 7 a.m.
      • Battle of the Bight of Heligoland (Aug. 28).
      • The Sinking of the Mainz.
    • A British Destroyer in action.
    • Rear-Admiral Sir David Beatty.    Photo, Central News.
    • The Battle Cruiser Lion.    Photo, Symonds and Co.
    • Position at 7 a.m.
    • Battle of the Bight of Heligoland (Aug. 28).
    • The Sinking of the Mainz.
    • CHAPTER XXIII.
      • THE TURN OF THE TIDE.
        • Trenches in the Streets of Paris.    Photo, Sport and General.
        • Parisians watching German Aeroplanes. Photo, Central News.
        • The position of the Allied Armies immediately before their advance.
        • Von Kluck's Artillery passing through a French village on its march towards Paris. Photo, Topical Press.
        • General van Kluck. (Photo, Central News.)
      • Trenches in the Streets of Paris.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • Parisians watching German Aeroplanes. Photo, Central News.
      • The position of the Allied Armies immediately before their advance.
      • Von Kluck's Artillery passing through a French village on its march towards Paris. Photo, Topical Press.
      • General van Kluck. (Photo, Central News.)
    • THE TURN OF THE TIDE.
      • Trenches in the Streets of Paris.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • Parisians watching German Aeroplanes. Photo, Central News.
      • The position of the Allied Armies immediately before their advance.
      • Von Kluck's Artillery passing through a French village on its march towards Paris. Photo, Topical Press.
      • General van Kluck. (Photo, Central News.)
    • Trenches in the Streets of Paris.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • Parisians watching German Aeroplanes. Photo, Central News.
    • The position of the Allied Armies immediately before their advance.
    • Von Kluck's Artillery passing through a French village on its march towards Paris. Photo, Topical Press.
    • General van Kluck. (Photo, Central News.)
    • CHAPTER XXIV.
      • THE CROSSING OF THE MARNE.
    • THE CROSSING OF THE MARNE.
    • CHAPTER XXV.
      • THE BATTLE OF THE MARNE.
        • German Infantry advancing to a new position.    Photo, Sport and General.
        • General Foch.
        • The Germans in Retreat. So hurried was their march towards the Aisne that at certain times it "had the appearance of a rout." From the drawing by Dudley Tennant.
      • German Infantry advancing to a new position.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • General Foch.
      • The Germans in Retreat. So hurried was their march towards the Aisne that at certain times it "had the appearance of a rout." From the drawing by Dudley Tennant.
    • THE BATTLE OF THE MARNE.
      • German Infantry advancing to a new position.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • General Foch.
      • The Germans in Retreat. So hurried was their march towards the Aisne that at certain times it "had the appearance of a rout." From the drawing by Dudley Tennant.
    • German Infantry advancing to a new position.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • General Foch.
    • The Germans in Retreat. So hurried was their march towards the Aisne that at certain times it "had the appearance of a rout." From the drawing by Dudley Tennant.
    • CHAPTER XXVI.
      • STORIES OF THE BATTLE OF THE MARNE.
        • The City of Meaux after the German Retreat.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • The City of Meaux after the German Retreat.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • STORIES OF THE BATTLE OF THE MARNE.
      • The City of Meaux after the German Retreat.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • The City of Meaux after the German Retreat.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • CHAPTER XXVII.
      • MORE STORIES OF THE BATTLE OF THE MARNE.
        • French Detachment retaking a Village.    Photo, Illustrated London News.
        • At Méry-sur-Marne a French Red Cross train was blown up by the Germans just as it was crossing the river with its load of wounded. This picture shows the scene after the explosion.    Photo, Sport and General.
        • "Baby Rose" such is the nickname bestowed on the smallest of French soldiers, who appears above. He is a great favourite with the Zouaves, one of whom is seen accompanying him.    Photo, Daily Mirror
      • French Detachment retaking a Village.    Photo, Illustrated London News.
      • At Méry-sur-Marne a French Red Cross train was blown up by the Germans just as it was crossing the river with its load of wounded. This picture shows the scene after the explosion.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • "Baby Rose" such is the nickname bestowed on the smallest of French soldiers, who appears above. He is a great favourite with the Zouaves, one of whom is seen accompanying him.    Photo, Daily Mirror
    • MORE STORIES OF THE BATTLE OF THE MARNE.
      • French Detachment retaking a Village.    Photo, Illustrated London News.
      • At Méry-sur-Marne a French Red Cross train was blown up by the Germans just as it was crossing the river with its load of wounded. This picture shows the scene after the explosion.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • "Baby Rose" such is the nickname bestowed on the smallest of French soldiers, who appears above. He is a great favourite with the Zouaves, one of whom is seen accompanying him.    Photo, Daily Mirror
    • French Detachment retaking a Village.    Photo, Illustrated London News.
    • At Méry-sur-Marne a French Red Cross train was blown up by the Germans just as it was crossing the river with its load of wounded. This picture shows the scene after the explosion.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • "Baby Rose" such is the nickname bestowed on the smallest of French soldiers, who appears above. He is a great favourite with the Zouaves, one of whom is seen accompanying him.    Photo, Daily Mirror
    • CHAPTER XXVIII.
      • THE AISNE VALLEY.
        • British Position on September 12, on the Eve of the Battle of the Aisne.
      • British Position on September 12, on the Eve of the Battle of the Aisne.
    • THE AISNE VALLEY.
      • British Position on September 12, on the Eve of the Battle of the Aisne.
    • British Position on September 12, on the Eve of the Battle of the Aisne.
    • CHAPTER XXIX.
      • THE CROSSING OF THE AISNE.
        • German Sharpshooters on the Heights of the Aisne. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
        • "He sat down in full view of the enemy, and poured a hail of bullets on the advancing Germans." From the picture by F. Gardiner.
        • Sermoise Spur    R. Vesle    By permission of the Illustrated London News. Diagram of the Aisne Valley showing the part of the River attacked by the British. In his dispatch of October 8, 1914, Sir John French thus describes the Aisne valley:—"The Aisne Valley runs generally east and west, and consists of a flat-bottomed depression of width varying from half a mile to two miles, down which the river follows a winding course to the west, at some points near the southern slopes of the valley, and at others near the northern. "The high ground both on the north and south of the river is about 400 feet above the bottom of the valley, and is very similar in character, as are both slopes of the valley itself, which are broken into numerous rounded spurs cut into by ravines. The most prominent of the former are the Chivres Spur on the right bank, and Sermoise Spur on the left. Near the latter place the general plateau on the south is divided by a subsidiary valley of much the same character down which the small river Vesle flows to the main stream near Sermoise. The slopes of the plateau overlooking the Aisne on the north and south are of varying steepness, and are covered with numerous patches of wood, which also stretch upwards and backwards over the edge on to the top of the high ground. The Aisne is a sluggish stream of some 170 feet in breadth, but being 15 feet deep in the centre, it is unfordable. Between Soissons on the west and Villers on the east (some 3 miles south-east of Soupir) there are eleven road bridges across it. On the north bank a narrow-gauge railway runs from Soissons to Vailly where it crosses the river, and continues eastward along the south bank. From Soissons to Sermoise a double line of railway runs along the south bank, turning at the latter place up the Vesle Valley. "The position held by the enemy is a very strong one, either for delaying action or for a defensive battle. One of its chief military characteristics is that from the high ground on neither side can the top of the plateau on the other side be seen, except for small stretches. This is chiefly due to the woods on the edges of the slopes. Another important point is that all the bridges are under direct or high-angle artillery fire. "The tract of country above described, which lies north of the Aisne, is well adapted to concealment, and was so skilfully turned to account by the enemy as to render it impossible to judge the real nature of his opposition to our passage of the river or accurately to gauge his strength. But I have every reason to conclude that strong rearguards of at least three army corps were holding the passages on the early morning of the 13th. On that morning I ordered the British forces to advance and make good the Aisne."
      • German Sharpshooters on the Heights of the Aisne. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • "He sat down in full view of the enemy, and poured a hail of bullets on the advancing Germans." From the picture by F. Gardiner.
      • Sermoise Spur    R. Vesle    By permission of the Illustrated London News. Diagram of the Aisne Valley showing the part of the River attacked by the British. In his dispatch of October 8, 1914, Sir John French thus describes the Aisne valley:—"The Aisne Valley runs generally east and west, and consists of a flat-bottomed depression of width varying from half a mile to two miles, down which the river follows a winding course to the west, at some points near the southern slopes of the valley, and at others near the northern. "The high ground both on the north and south of the river is about 400 feet above the bottom of the valley, and is very similar in character, as are both slopes of the valley itself, which are broken into numerous rounded spurs cut into by ravines. The most prominent of the former are the Chivres Spur on the right bank, and Sermoise Spur on the left. Near the latter place the general plateau on the south is divided by a subsidiary valley of much the same character down which the small river Vesle flows to the main stream near Sermoise. The slopes of the plateau overlooking the Aisne on the north and south are of varying steepness, and are covered with numerous patches of wood, which also stretch upwards and backwards over the edge on to the top of the high ground. The Aisne is a sluggish stream of some 170 feet in breadth, but being 15 feet deep in the centre, it is unfordable. Between Soissons on the west and Villers on the east (some 3 miles south-east of Soupir) there are eleven road bridges across it. On the north bank a narrow-gauge railway runs from Soissons to Vailly where it crosses the river, and continues eastward along the south bank. From Soissons to Sermoise a double line of railway runs along the south bank, turning at the latter place up the Vesle Valley. "The position held by the enemy is a very strong one, either for delaying action or for a defensive battle. One of its chief military characteristics is that from the high ground on neither side can the top of the plateau on the other side be seen, except for small stretches. This is chiefly due to the woods on the edges of the slopes. Another important point is that all the bridges are under direct or high-angle artillery fire. "The tract of country above described, which lies north of the Aisne, is well adapted to concealment, and was so skilfully turned to account by the enemy as to render it impossible to judge the real nature of his opposition to our passage of the river or accurately to gauge his strength. But I have every reason to conclude that strong rearguards of at least three army corps were holding the passages on the early morning of the 13th. On that morning I ordered the British forces to advance and make good the Aisne."
    • THE CROSSING OF THE AISNE.
      • German Sharpshooters on the Heights of the Aisne. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • "He sat down in full view of the enemy, and poured a hail of bullets on the advancing Germans." From the picture by F. Gardiner.
      • Sermoise Spur    R. Vesle    By permission of the Illustrated London News. Diagram of the Aisne Valley showing the part of the River attacked by the British. In his dispatch of October 8, 1914, Sir John French thus describes the Aisne valley:—"The Aisne Valley runs generally east and west, and consists of a flat-bottomed depression of width varying from half a mile to two miles, down which the river follows a winding course to the west, at some points near the southern slopes of the valley, and at others near the northern. "The high ground both on the north and south of the river is about 400 feet above the bottom of the valley, and is very similar in character, as are both slopes of the valley itself, which are broken into numerous rounded spurs cut into by ravines. The most prominent of the former are the Chivres Spur on the right bank, and Sermoise Spur on the left. Near the latter place the general plateau on the south is divided by a subsidiary valley of much the same character down which the small river Vesle flows to the main stream near Sermoise. The slopes of the plateau overlooking the Aisne on the north and south are of varying steepness, and are covered with numerous patches of wood, which also stretch upwards and backwards over the edge on to the top of the high ground. The Aisne is a sluggish stream of some 170 feet in breadth, but being 15 feet deep in the centre, it is unfordable. Between Soissons on the west and Villers on the east (some 3 miles south-east of Soupir) there are eleven road bridges across it. On the north bank a narrow-gauge railway runs from Soissons to Vailly where it crosses the river, and continues eastward along the south bank. From Soissons to Sermoise a double line of railway runs along the south bank, turning at the latter place up the Vesle Valley. "The position held by the enemy is a very strong one, either for delaying action or for a defensive battle. One of its chief military characteristics is that from the high ground on neither side can the top of the plateau on the other side be seen, except for small stretches. This is chiefly due to the woods on the edges of the slopes. Another important point is that all the bridges are under direct or high-angle artillery fire. "The tract of country above described, which lies north of the Aisne, is well adapted to concealment, and was so skilfully turned to account by the enemy as to render it impossible to judge the real nature of his opposition to our passage of the river or accurately to gauge his strength. But I have every reason to conclude that strong rearguards of at least three army corps were holding the passages on the early morning of the 13th. On that morning I ordered the British forces to advance and make good the Aisne."
    • German Sharpshooters on the Heights of the Aisne. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • "He sat down in full view of the enemy, and poured a hail of bullets on the advancing Germans." From the picture by F. Gardiner.
    • Sermoise Spur    R. Vesle    By permission of the Illustrated London News. Diagram of the Aisne Valley showing the part of the River attacked by the British. In his dispatch of October 8, 1914, Sir John French thus describes the Aisne valley:—"The Aisne Valley runs generally east and west, and consists of a flat-bottomed depression of width varying from half a mile to two miles, down which the river follows a winding course to the west, at some points near the southern slopes of the valley, and at others near the northern. "The high ground both on the north and south of the river is about 400 feet above the bottom of the valley, and is very similar in character, as are both slopes of the valley itself, which are broken into numerous rounded spurs cut into by ravines. The most prominent of the former are the Chivres Spur on the right bank, and Sermoise Spur on the left. Near the latter place the general plateau on the south is divided by a subsidiary valley of much the same character down which the small river Vesle flows to the main stream near Sermoise. The slopes of the plateau overlooking the Aisne on the north and south are of varying steepness, and are covered with numerous patches of wood, which also stretch upwards and backwards over the edge on to the top of the high ground. The Aisne is a sluggish stream of some 170 feet in breadth, but being 15 feet deep in the centre, it is unfordable. Between Soissons on the west and Villers on the east (some 3 miles south-east of Soupir) there are eleven road bridges across it. On the north bank a narrow-gauge railway runs from Soissons to Vailly where it crosses the river, and continues eastward along the south bank. From Soissons to Sermoise a double line of railway runs along the south bank, turning at the latter place up the Vesle Valley. "The position held by the enemy is a very strong one, either for delaying action or for a defensive battle. One of its chief military characteristics is that from the high ground on neither side can the top of the plateau on the other side be seen, except for small stretches. This is chiefly due to the woods on the edges of the slopes. Another important point is that all the bridges are under direct or high-angle artillery fire. "The tract of country above described, which lies north of the Aisne, is well adapted to concealment, and was so skilfully turned to account by the enemy as to render it impossible to judge the real nature of his opposition to our passage of the river or accurately to gauge his strength. But I have every reason to conclude that strong rearguards of at least three army corps were holding the passages on the early morning of the 13th. On that morning I ordered the British forces to advance and make good the Aisne."
    • CHAPTER XXX.
      • THE BATTLE OF THE AISNE.
    • THE BATTLE OF THE AISNE.
    • CHAPTER XXXI.
      • SOLDIERS' STORIES OF THE BATTLE OF THE AISNE.
        • A Riderless Charge.    From the drawing by Lionel Edwards.
      • A Riderless Charge.    From the drawing by Lionel Edwards.
      • A French Aeroplane discovering the Position of German Guns.
        • One of the main duties of the Royal Flying Corps is to discover the position of the German batteries. An aeroplane is sent over the suspected area as a decoy, and is almost sure to draw the fire of the enemy's guns, thus giving the range to the Allies' artillery. Our picture shows French artillery moving out of a village to bombard a German position thus discovered. The drawing was prepared under the direction of an officer who was in the village and witnessed the incident.    Drawn by Lionel Edwards.
      • One of the main duties of the Royal Flying Corps is to discover the position of the German batteries. An aeroplane is sent over the suspected area as a decoy, and is almost sure to draw the fire of the enemy's guns, thus giving the range to the Allies' artillery. Our picture shows French artillery moving out of a village to bombard a German position thus discovered. The drawing was prepared under the direction of an officer who was in the village and witnessed the incident.    Drawn by Lionel Edwards.
      • In the German Trenches on the Aisne.
        • This picture appeared in a Leipzig illustrated paper; it is drawn from a sketch by an eye-witness.
        • Private George Wilson, V.C.
      • This picture appeared in a Leipzig illustrated paper; it is drawn from a sketch by an eye-witness.
      • Private George Wilson, V.C.
    • SOLDIERS' STORIES OF THE BATTLE OF THE AISNE.
      • A Riderless Charge.    From the drawing by Lionel Edwards.
    • A Riderless Charge.    From the drawing by Lionel Edwards.
    • A French Aeroplane discovering the Position of German Guns.
      • One of the main duties of the Royal Flying Corps is to discover the position of the German batteries. An aeroplane is sent over the suspected area as a decoy, and is almost sure to draw the fire of the enemy's guns, thus giving the range to the Allies' artillery. Our picture shows French artillery moving out of a village to bombard a German position thus discovered. The drawing was prepared under the direction of an officer who was in the village and witnessed the incident.    Drawn by Lionel Edwards.
    • One of the main duties of the Royal Flying Corps is to discover the position of the German batteries. An aeroplane is sent over the suspected area as a decoy, and is almost sure to draw the fire of the enemy's guns, thus giving the range to the Allies' artillery. Our picture shows French artillery moving out of a village to bombard a German position thus discovered. The drawing was prepared under the direction of an officer who was in the village and witnessed the incident.    Drawn by Lionel Edwards.
    • In the German Trenches on the Aisne.
      • This picture appeared in a Leipzig illustrated paper; it is drawn from a sketch by an eye-witness.
      • Private George Wilson, V.C.
    • This picture appeared in a Leipzig illustrated paper; it is drawn from a sketch by an eye-witness.
    • Private George Wilson, V.C.
    • CHAPTER XXXII.
      • VERDUN AND RHEIMS.
        • Fighting in the Argonne.    Photo, The Sphere.
        • Some of the fiercest fighting in the war has taken place in this region. Our illustration shows the French recapturing a trench and meeting a determined counter-attack of the Germans.
        • The Barrier Fortresses of France.
        • The Cathedral at Rheims before bombardment. Photo, Sport and General.
        • Portal of Rheims Cathedral after Bombardment. Photo, Central News.
        • Sikhs marching through Marseilles. Photo, London News Agency.
      • Fighting in the Argonne.    Photo, The Sphere.
      • Some of the fiercest fighting in the war has taken place in this region. Our illustration shows the French recapturing a trench and meeting a determined counter-attack of the Germans.
      • The Barrier Fortresses of France.
      • The Cathedral at Rheims before bombardment. Photo, Sport and General.
      • Portal of Rheims Cathedral after Bombardment. Photo, Central News.
      • Sikhs marching through Marseilles. Photo, London News Agency.
    • VERDUN AND RHEIMS.
      • Fighting in the Argonne.    Photo, The Sphere.
      • Some of the fiercest fighting in the war has taken place in this region. Our illustration shows the French recapturing a trench and meeting a determined counter-attack of the Germans.
      • The Barrier Fortresses of France.
      • The Cathedral at Rheims before bombardment. Photo, Sport and General.
      • Portal of Rheims Cathedral after Bombardment. Photo, Central News.
      • Sikhs marching through Marseilles. Photo, London News Agency.
    • Fighting in the Argonne.    Photo, The Sphere.
    • Some of the fiercest fighting in the war has taken place in this region. Our illustration shows the French recapturing a trench and meeting a determined counter-attack of the Germans.
    • The Barrier Fortresses of France.
    • The Cathedral at Rheims before bombardment. Photo, Sport and General.
    • Portal of Rheims Cathedral after Bombardment. Photo, Central News.
    • Sikhs marching through Marseilles. Photo, London News Agency.
    • CHAPTER XXXIII.
      • THE RACE TO THE SEA.
      • A Charge of French Light Cavalry at Lassigny.
        • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
        • Sketch Map to illustrate the Extension of the Allied Left.
      • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • Sketch Map to illustrate the Extension of the Allied Left.
      • A Meeting of the Generals.
        • (Drawn by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
        • The French artist who painted this picture writes:—"At night, somewhere near the front, inside an abandoned farmhouse in the midst of fields, two men are together—those on whom we set all our hopes, who give all their knowledge, their lives, for the freedom of the world. You never know where they are, and, if you do see them, still you must not know where you met them. They are nowhere and yet everywhere. Very often only a single sentry betrays their temporary shelter. The motor cars wait, panting, to carry them as quick as possible to wherever their presence is needed."
      • (Drawn by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • The French artist who painted this picture writes:—"At night, somewhere near the front, inside an abandoned farmhouse in the midst of fields, two men are together—those on whom we set all our hopes, who give all their knowledge, their lives, for the freedom of the world. You never know where they are, and, if you do see them, still you must not know where you met them. They are nowhere and yet everywhere. Very often only a single sentry betrays their temporary shelter. The motor cars wait, panting, to carry them as quick as possible to wherever their presence is needed."
    • THE RACE TO THE SEA.
    • A Charge of French Light Cavalry at Lassigny.
      • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • Sketch Map to illustrate the Extension of the Allied Left.
    • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • Sketch Map to illustrate the Extension of the Allied Left.
    • A Meeting of the Generals.
      • (Drawn by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • The French artist who painted this picture writes:—"At night, somewhere near the front, inside an abandoned farmhouse in the midst of fields, two men are together—those on whom we set all our hopes, who give all their knowledge, their lives, for the freedom of the world. You never know where they are, and, if you do see them, still you must not know where you met them. They are nowhere and yet everywhere. Very often only a single sentry betrays their temporary shelter. The motor cars wait, panting, to carry them as quick as possible to wherever their presence is needed."
    • (Drawn by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • The French artist who painted this picture writes:—"At night, somewhere near the front, inside an abandoned farmhouse in the midst of fields, two men are together—those on whom we set all our hopes, who give all their knowledge, their lives, for the freedom of the world. You never know where they are, and, if you do see them, still you must not know where you met them. They are nowhere and yet everywhere. Very often only a single sentry betrays their temporary shelter. The motor cars wait, panting, to carry them as quick as possible to wherever their presence is needed."
    • CHAPTER XXXIV.
      • THE FIRST RUSSIAN ADVANCE TO CRACOW.
        • Map to illustrate von Hindenburg's Advance to the Niemen and the Battle of Augustovo.
      • Map to illustrate von Hindenburg's Advance to the Niemen and the Battle of Augustovo.
      • "Three Emperors' Corner."    Photo, Central News.
        • Here three empires meet—the German, Austrian and Russian—three empires that between them hold sway in Europe over more than 375 millions of people, Teutonic and Slav, and exercise authority over nearly 2½ million square miles of territory—about two-thirds of the whole continent. In the foreground is seen a portion of German Silesia, on the right is Austrian Galicia, and in the background Russian Poland. The broad river is the Prgemeza; the smaller river is a tributary which here separates Austria from Russia.
        • First Russian Advance towards Cracow.
      • Here three empires meet—the German, Austrian and Russian—three empires that between them hold sway in Europe over more than 375 millions of people, Teutonic and Slav, and exercise authority over nearly 2½ million square miles of territory—about two-thirds of the whole continent. In the foreground is seen a portion of German Silesia, on the right is Austrian Galicia, and in the background Russian Poland. The broad river is the Prgemeza; the smaller river is a tributary which here separates Austria from Russia.
      • First Russian Advance towards Cracow.
    • THE FIRST RUSSIAN ADVANCE TO CRACOW.
      • Map to illustrate von Hindenburg's Advance to the Niemen and the Battle of Augustovo.
    • Map to illustrate von Hindenburg's Advance to the Niemen and the Battle of Augustovo.
    • "Three Emperors' Corner."    Photo, Central News.
      • Here three empires meet—the German, Austrian and Russian—three empires that between them hold sway in Europe over more than 375 millions of people, Teutonic and Slav, and exercise authority over nearly 2½ million square miles of territory—about two-thirds of the whole continent. In the foreground is seen a portion of German Silesia, on the right is Austrian Galicia, and in the background Russian Poland. The broad river is the Prgemeza; the smaller river is a tributary which here separates Austria from Russia.
      • First Russian Advance towards Cracow.
    • Here three empires meet—the German, Austrian and Russian—three empires that between them hold sway in Europe over more than 375 millions of people, Teutonic and Slav, and exercise authority over nearly 2½ million square miles of territory—about two-thirds of the whole continent. In the foreground is seen a portion of German Silesia, on the right is Austrian Galicia, and in the background Russian Poland. The broad river is the Prgemeza; the smaller river is a tributary which here separates Austria from Russia.
    • First Russian Advance towards Cracow.
    • CHAPTER XXXV.
      • ANTWERP AS IT WAS.
      • A Bird's-eye View of Antwerp.    Photo, Topical Press.
        • This photograph was taken from one of the towers of Antwerp's magnificent cathedral—the largest and most beautiful Gothic church in the Netherlands. Its north tower rises to a height of more than four hundred feet. On the south side of the cathedral is the Place Verte (Green Place), with a statue of Rubens, whose famous picture, "The Descent from the Cross," formerly hung in the south transept. In the north transept was another of his great paintings, "The Elevation of the Cross."
        • The Entrenched Camp of Antwerp.
      • This photograph was taken from one of the towers of Antwerp's magnificent cathedral—the largest and most beautiful Gothic church in the Netherlands. Its north tower rises to a height of more than four hundred feet. On the south side of the cathedral is the Place Verte (Green Place), with a statue of Rubens, whose famous picture, "The Descent from the Cross," formerly hung in the south transept. In the north transept was another of his great paintings, "The Elevation of the Cross."
      • The Entrenched Camp of Antwerp.
    • ANTWERP AS IT WAS.
    • A Bird's-eye View of Antwerp.    Photo, Topical Press.
      • This photograph was taken from one of the towers of Antwerp's magnificent cathedral—the largest and most beautiful Gothic church in the Netherlands. Its north tower rises to a height of more than four hundred feet. On the south side of the cathedral is the Place Verte (Green Place), with a statue of Rubens, whose famous picture, "The Descent from the Cross," formerly hung in the south transept. In the north transept was another of his great paintings, "The Elevation of the Cross."
      • The Entrenched Camp of Antwerp.
    • This photograph was taken from one of the towers of Antwerp's magnificent cathedral—the largest and most beautiful Gothic church in the Netherlands. Its north tower rises to a height of more than four hundred feet. On the south side of the cathedral is the Place Verte (Green Place), with a statue of Rubens, whose famous picture, "The Descent from the Cross," formerly hung in the south transept. In the north transept was another of his great paintings, "The Elevation of the Cross."
    • The Entrenched Camp of Antwerp.
    • CHAPTER XXXVI.
      • THE SIEGE AND FALL OF ANTWERP.
        • Belgians intrenched on the Nethe.    Photopress.
        • The Flight into Holland.    From a picture by Allan Stewart.
        • British Naval Brigade in the Trenches outside Antwerp. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • Belgians intrenched on the Nethe.    Photopress.
      • The Flight into Holland.    From a picture by Allan Stewart.
      • British Naval Brigade in the Trenches outside Antwerp. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • Antwerp under Bombardment.
        • (From the picture by Cyrus Cuneo.)
      • (From the picture by Cyrus Cuneo.)
      • END OF VOLUME II.
        • PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • THE SIEGE AND FALL OF ANTWERP.
      • Belgians intrenched on the Nethe.    Photopress.
      • The Flight into Holland.    From a picture by Allan Stewart.
      • British Naval Brigade in the Trenches outside Antwerp. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • Belgians intrenched on the Nethe.    Photopress.
    • The Flight into Holland.    From a picture by Allan Stewart.
    • British Naval Brigade in the Trenches outside Antwerp. Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • Antwerp under Bombardment.
      • (From the picture by Cyrus Cuneo.)
    • (From the picture by Cyrus Cuneo.)
    • END OF VOLUME II.
      • PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
    • FOOTNOTES:
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