Tense and Text in Classical Arabic
Free

Tense and Text in Classical Arabic

By Michal Marmorstein
Free
Book Description

This study undertakes to examine the problem of the tenses in Classical Arabic. While aware of the long tradition which shaped the discussion of this subject, and building, in fact, on some important insights offered by medieval and modern grammarians, this study attempts to redefine the discussion and propose a new analysis of the tenses, based on a functional text-oriented investigation of a large corpus of Classical Arabic prose.This title was made Open Access by libraries from around the world through Knowledge Unlatched.

Table of Contents
  • ‎Contents
  • ‎Acknowledgements
  • ‎Chapter 1. Introduction
    • ‎1.1. The Problem
    • ‎1.2. Autonomous or Contextual Meaning(s) of the Verb
    • ‎1.3. The Method
      • ‎1.3.1. Methodological Principles
      • ‎1.3.2. An Outline of the Analytical Procedure
    • ‎1.4. Language and Corpus Definition
      • ‎1.4.1. Classical Arabic
      • ‎1.4.2. Classical Arabic Prose
    • ‎1.5. The Structure and Scope of the Study
    • ‎1.6. Technical Remarks
  • ‎Chapter 2. The Verb in Arabic Grammatical Tradition
    • ‎2.1. Two Frames of Discussion
    • ‎2.2. The Semantological Frame
    • ‎2.3. The Grammatical Frame
      • ‎2.3.1. ʾiʿrāb and bināʾ
      • ‎2.3.2. The Term al-muḍāriʿ
    • ‎2.4. Summary
  • ‎Chapter 3. The Verb in Arabistic Literature
    • ‎3.1. The Verbal System in Arabic and Semitic
    • ‎3.2. The Question of Tense or Aspect
    • ‎3.3. Summary
  • ‎Chapter 4. The Structure of Context
    • ‎4.1. The Conceptualization of Context
    • ‎4.2. Deictic Reference
    • ‎4.3. Text Types
    • ‎4.4. Interdependency
    • ‎4.5. Clause Types
    • ‎4.6. Lexical Classes
    • ‎4.7. Summary
  • ‎Chapter 5. The Verbal Inventory
    • ‎5.1. Inventory of Forms
    • ‎5.2. Indicative Verbal Forms
      • ‎5.2.1. Simple Forms
      • ‎5.2.2. Modified Forms
        • ‎5.2.2.1. The Modifier qad
        • ‎5.2.2.2. The Modifier la-
        • ‎5.2.2.3. The Modifier sawfa/sa-
      • ‎5.2.3. Compound Forms
    • ‎5.3. Modal Verbal Forms
    • ‎5.4. Negated Verbal Forms
    • ‎5.5. Summary
  • ‎Chapter 6. The Syntagmatic Structure of the Clause
    • ‎6.1. The Inter-clausal Syntagm
      • ‎6.1.2. Dependency Status
      • ‎6.1.3. Linking Devices
    • ‎6.2. The Intra-clausal Syntagm
      • ‎6.2.1. Word Order and Agreement
      • ‎6.2.2. Clausal Operators
        • ‎6.2.2.1. Operators of Embedded Clauses
        • ‎6.2.2.2. Operators of Non-embedded Clauses
    • ‎6.3. Summary
  • ‎Chapter 7. The Verbal Paradigm in Embedded Clauses
    • ‎7.1. Preliminaries
    • ‎7.2. Substantival (Content) ʾanna-clauses
    • ‎7.3. Adjectival/Relative Clauses
      • ‎7.3.1. llaḏī-clauses
      • ‎7.3.2. Asyndetic Adjectival Clauses
      • ‎7.3.3. mā-clauses
      • ‎7.3.4. man-clauses
    • ‎7.4. Adverbial ḥīna-clauses
    • ‎7.5. Summary
  • ‎Chapter 8. The Predicative Paradigm
    • ‎8.1. Preliminaries
    • ‎8.2. Verbal Complexes
      • ‎8.2.1. kāna-compounds
      • ‎8.2.2. Modifying Verbs
      • ‎8.2.3. Motion and State Verbs
      • ‎8.2.4. Perception and Permission Verbs
      • ‎8.2.5. Speech Verbs
    • ‎8.3. Circumstantial Clauses
    • ‎8.4. Mutually Dependent Clauses
      • ‎8.4.1. Setting Clauses
      • ‎8.4.2. Presentative Clauses
    • ‎8.5. Summary
  • ‎Chapter 9. The Verbal Paradigm in the Dialogue
    • ‎9.1. Preliminaries
    • ‎9.2. Declarative Clauses
      • ‎9.2.1. Plain Declaratives
      • ‎9.2.2. Argumentative ʾinna-clauses
      • ‎9.2.3. Asseverative ʾinna la-clauses
      • ‎9.2.4. Negative Clauses
    • ‎9.3. Performative Clauses
    • ‎9.4. Optative Clauses
    • ‎9.5. Interrogative Clauses
    • ‎9.6. Summary
  • ‎Chapter 10. The Verbal Paradigm in the Narrative
    • ‎10.1. Preliminaries
    • ‎10.2. The Main-line: faʿala-initiated Chains
      • ‎10.2.1. The faʿala conn-faʿala Pattern
      • ‎10.2.2. The faʿala yafʿalu/fāʿilan Pattern
      • ‎10.2.3. The faʿala fa-yafʿalu Pattern
    • ‎10.3. The Background
      • ‎10.3.1. Free and Dependent Clauses
      • ‎10.3.2. Eventive and Descriptive Background
    • ‎10.4. Setting-presentative Constructions
      • ‎10.4.1. Setting and Preposed Temporal Clauses
      • ‎10.4.2. Presentative Clauses
    • ‎10.5. Generic Narratives
    • ‎10.6. Summary
  • ‎Chapter 11. The Verbal Paradigm in the Generic Utterance
    • ‎11.1. Preliminaries
    • ‎11.2. The Structure of Generic Clauses
    • ‎11.3. Indicative Verbal Forms in Generic Clauses
    • ‎11.4. Modal Verbal Forms in Generic Clauses
    • ‎11.5. Summary
  • ‎Chapter 12. Conclusions
  • ‎References
  • ‎Index
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