Genre - text - interpretation
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Genre - text - interpretation

By Kaarina Koski (editor)
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Book Description

This book presents current discussions on the concept of genre. It introduces innovative, multidisciplinary approaches to contemporary and historical genres, their roles in cultural discourse, how they change, and their relations to each other. 

 The reader is guided into the discussion surrounding this key concept and its history through a general introduction, followed by eighteen chapters that represent a variety of discursive practices as well as analytic methods from several scholarly traditions.

This volume will have wide appeal to several academic audiences within the humanities, both in Finland and abroad, and will especially be of interest to scholars of folklore, language and cultural expression.

Table of Contents
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
    • At the Intersection of Text and Interpretation
      • Roots of Western Genre Theory
      • Genre and Text
      • From Text to Interpretation
      • Genre Theory Today and Tomorrow
      • A Multivocal Discussion
        • I Theoretical Approaches to Genre
        • II Relations between and within Genres
        • III Between Folklore and Literature
        • IV Emic and Etic Definitions
        • V The Politics of Meaning-Making
        • Multifaceted Perspectives
  • I Theoretical Approaches to Genre
    • 1. “Genres, Genres Everywhere, but Who Knows What to Think?”
      • The Term “Genre”
      • Toward a Definition
      • Genre as Social Semiotic
      • A Usage-Based Approach
      • Aspect 1: Form
      • Aspect 2: Content/Enactment
      • The Form–Content/Enactment Relation
      • Aspect 3: Practice
      • The Form–Content/Enactment–Practice Constellation
      • Aspect 4: Functions
      • The Four-Aspect Model of Emergent Genre
      • A Usage-Based Approach to Variation
      • Problems of Horizons and Historical Genres
      • Cultural and Cross-Cultural Genre Typologies
      • Genres, Social Resources and Application
    • 2. Genres as Real Kinds and Projections
      • What is the Purpose of Genre Classification?
      • Genres as Homeostatic Property Clusters
      • Laments as a Local Kind – or a Universal One?
      • People, Their Genres, and the Historicity of Genres
      • Genres, Classes, and Theories: Some Consequences
  • II Relations between and within Genres
    • 3. The Legend Genre and Narrative Registers
      • Classificatory Ideal and Its Critique in Legend Studies
      • Terminological Problems – What Do We Mean by Fabulate?
      • Contemporary Legends and the Widening Perspective
      • Genre as Practice
      • Narrative Genres in Linguistics
      • Genre and Register
      • Narrative Registers as Instantiations of Legend
      • Conclusion
    • 4. Genre, Prayers and the Anglo-Saxon Charms
      • “Charms” and “Prayers”
      • Case Study: Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 41
      • Conclusions
    • 5. Notes on Reflexivity and Genre in Stand-Up Comedy Routines
      • Stand-Up Routines as Generic Texts
      • Politics of Presentation
      • Genres as Tools of Stand-Up Routines
      • Managing the Performance: Framing and Footing
      • Lindström’s Elephant Routine
      • And Then What?
    • 6. The Poetics of Quotation
      • From Proverb to Proverbial Speech
      • Proverbial Couplets as Formulae
      • Representing Proverb Performances
      • From Proverb to Aphoristic Poem
      • Composition in Proverb Performance
      • The Poetics of Quotation
  • III Between Folklore and Literature
    • 7. The Genre of Reminiscence Writing
      • The Bakhtinian Idea of Genre as a Dialogic Framework
      • The External Orientation of Reminiscence Writings
      • The Internal Orientation of the Genre
      • Eeva Kilpi’s Works
      • Levels of Intertextuality
      • Conclusions
    • 8. The Chronotope of the Legend in Astrid Lindgren’s Sunnanäng
      • Chronotope, Genre and Intertext
      • The Generic Chronotope of Short Stories and Belief Legends
      • The Red Bird
      • My Nightingale Is Singing
      • Towards a Third Level of Chronotopes?
    • 9. Genre and the Prosimetra of the Old Icelandic fornaldarsögur
      • Saga Genre in Manuscript Compilations
      • The Role of Verse in the Prose Sagas
      • Poetry and the Development of the fornaldarsaga Corpus
      • Divisions of the fornaldarsaga Subgenre
      • Genealogies and Regnal Lists
      • Fornaldarsögur Related to konungasögur
      • Germanic Heroic Legend
      • The Hrafnista Family Sagas
      • Romances
      • Fornaldarsögur without Verse
      • Conclusions
    • 10. From Traditional to Transitional Texts
      • Direct Copying and the Notion of Fixed Textuality as Literary Features
      • Basic Characteristics of Transitional Texts
      • Transitional Texts in South Slavic Tradition Composed by Literate Authors
      • Transitional South Slavic Texts Documented from Oral Singers
      • Comparative Analysis of the Songs about the Battle against Mahmut Pasha
      • Towards a Consistent Theoretical Model of Transitional Texts
  • IV Emic and Etic Definitions
    • 11. Proverbs – A Universal Genre?
      • Features Typical of the Proverb Genre
      • The Chinese
      • The Oral Culture of the Arabs
      • The Maoris
      • The Chamula Indians
      • Africa: Akan Rhetoric
      • Hawaii
      • The Universal Analytical Type
    • 12. The Proverb Genre
      • Various Conceptions of the Proverb
      • Some Features Connected with the Concept of the Proverb in Finnish
      • Finnish Proverbs in Oral Tradition and Literary Use
      • Finnish Proverbs in the Frame of the Emic–Etic Discussion
      • Changes in Contexts and Proverbs
      • Conclusions
    • 13. Major Generic Forms of Dogri lok gathas
      • A Dynamic View of Genre
      • Dogri and the Jammu Region
      • Dogri lok gathas
        • Karak gathas [‘Sacred narrative songs’]
        • Bar gathas [‘Heroic gathas’]
        • Yogi gathas [‘Gathas of the Yogis’]
        • Pranya gathas [‘Love gathas’]
        • Chettri gathas or Dholru gathas and Bar saware (Secular Seasonal gathas)
        • Seasonal Ritual gathas (Gusten gathas)
        • Anjaliyas
        • Chijji
      • The Composition and Re-Composition of lok gathas
      • Karak gathas as Illustrative of the Traditional Structuring of lok gathas
      • The lok gatha Genre Debate
      • Dogri lok gathas and Folklore Research
      • Defining šala
      • What Is Humor, Actually?
      • So, What about the Ordinary šala?
      • But How Does the šala Function?
      • Retelling of šale
      • Conclusion
  • V The Politics of Meaning-Making
    • 15. Genre as Ideology-Shaping Form
      • Form and Ideology: The Twelfth Parade
      • Form and Ideology: Local Character Anecdotes
      • Genre, Ideology, and Pascal’s Wager
    • 16. The Use of Narrative Genres within Oral History Texts
      • Early Classification of Collection Campaign Texts in Finland
      • In the 1980s and 1990s: Still on the Margins of Folklore Studies
      • Since the 2000s: A Literate Branch of Oral History
      • Case Study: Interpreting the Aftermath of the Civil War of 1918
      • Individual Approaches to the Political Past
      • Closing Remarks
    • 17. The Reputation of a Genre
      • Distinguishing Rumor
      • Early Rumor Research: Psychological Approach to the Study of Rumor
      • World War II and the Study of Rumor
      • Sociological Approaches to Rumor
      • Rumors, Plausibility, and Credibility
      • Context and Rumor
      • Forging a New Approach to Rumor
      • Conclusion
    • 18. Textual Politics of the Interpretative Act
      • The Foundations of the Metaphysical Detective Story
      • The Quest for Genres
      • Reading as Guessing
      • The Quest and the Repetition
      • To Speak of the Reading…
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