Agriculture for Beginners Revised Edition
Free

Agriculture for Beginners Revised Edition

By Frank Lincoln Stevens, Charles William Burkett, Daniel Harvey Hill
Free
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Table of Contents
  • AGRICULTURE FOR BEGINNERS
  • BY
  • CHARLES WILLIAM BURKETT
  • FRANK LINCOLN STEVENS
    • AND
  • DANIEL HARVEY HILL
    • REVISED EDITION
  • PREFACE
  • CONTENTS
  • TO THE TEACHER
  • AGRICULTURE FOR BEGINNERS
  • CHAPTER I
  • THE SOIL
    • SECTION I. ORIGIN OF THE SOIL
    • SECTION II. TILLAGE OF THE SOIL
    • SECTION III. THE MOISTURE OF THE SOIL
    • SECTION IV. HOW THE WATER RISES IN THE SOIL
    • SECTION V. DRAINING THE SOIL
    • SECTION VI. IMPROVING THE SOIL
    • SECTION VII. MANURING THE SOIL
      • Left, clay subsoil; Center, same, with fertilizer; Right, same, with humus
      • In left top pot, no plant food; in left bottom pot, plant food scanty; in both right pots, all elements of plant food present
  • CHAPTER II
  • THE SOIL AND THE PLANT
    • SECTION VIII. ROOTS
    • SECTION IX. HOW THE PLANT FEEDS FROM THE SOIL
    • SECTION X. ROOT-TUBERCLES
    • SECTION XI. THE ROTATION OF CROPS
      • An Illustration of Crop-Rotation
  • CHAPTER III
  • THE PLANT
    • SECTION XII. HOW A PLANT FEEDS FROM THE AIR
    • SECTION XIII. THE SAP CURRENT
    • SECTION XIV. THE FLOWER AND THE SEED
    • SECTION XV. POLLINATION
    • SECTION XVI. CROSSES, HYBRIDS, AND CROSS-POLLINATION
    • SECTION XVII. PROPAGATION BY BUDS
      • Brighton pollinated by 1, Salem; 2, Creveling; 3, Lindley; 4, Brighton; 5, Self-pollinated; 6, Nectar; 7, Jefferson; 8, Niagara
    • Plants to be propagated from Buds
    • SECTION XVIII. PLANT SEEDING
    • SECTION XIX. SELECTING SEED CORN
      • Boone County white corn on left, and original type, from which it was developed by selection, on right
    • SECTION XX. WEEDS
    • SECTION XXI. SEED PURITY AND VITALITY
      • Tube 1 represents one pound of redtop grass as bought; Tube 2, amount of pure redtop grass seeds in Tube 1; Tube 3, amount of chaff and dirt in Tube 1; Tube 4, amount of weed seeds in Tube 1; Tube 5, amount of total waste in Tube 1; Tube 6, amount of pure germinable seeds in Tube 1
  • CHAPTER IV
    • HOW TO RAISE A FRUIT TREE
    • SECTION XXII. GRAFTING
    • SECTION XXIII. BUDDING
    • SECTION XXIV. PLANTING AND PRUNING
  • CHAPTER V
  • HORTICULTURE
    • SECTION XXV. MARKET-GARDENING
    • SECTION XXVI. FLOWER GARDENING
  • CHAPTER VI
  • THE DISEASES OF PLANTS
    • SECTION XXVII. THE CAUSE AND NATURE OF PLANT DISEASE
    • SECTION XXVIII. YEAST AND BACTERIA
    • SECTION XXIX. PREVENTION OF PLANT DISEASE
    • SECTION XXX. SOME SPECIAL PLANT DISEASES
      • All the other plants in this field died. This one row lived because it could resist the cotton wilt
      • Note the difference in foliage and fruit on the sprayed and unsprayed halves of the tree, and the difference in yield shown below
  • CHAPTER VII
  • ORCHARD, GARDEN, AND FIELD INSECTS
    • SECTION XXXI. INSECTS IN GENERAL
    • SECTION XXXII. ORCHARD INSECTS
    • SECTION XXXIII. GARDEN AND FIELD INSECTS
    • SECTION XXXIV. THE COTTON-BOLL WEEVIL
      • Fig. 181. Map showing Distribution of the Cotton-Boll Weevil in 1913
  • CHAPTER VIII
    • FARM CROPS
    • SECTION XXXV. COTTON
    • SECTION XXXVI. TOBACCO
    • SECTION XXXVII. WHEAT
      • The yield of the lower field, forty-five bushels per acre, is due to intelligent farming
    • SECTION XXXVIII. CORN
    • SECTION XXXIX. PEANUTS
    • SECTION XL. SWEET POTATOES
    • SECTION XLI. WHITE, OR IRISH, POTATOES
    • SECTION XLII. OATS
    • SECTION XLIII. RYE
    • SECTION XLIV. BARLEY
    • SECTION XLV. SUGAR PLANTS
    • SECTION XLVI. HEMP AND FLAX
    • SECTION XLVII. BUCKWHEAT
    • SECTION XLVIII. RICE
    • SECTION XLIX. THE TIMBER CROP
    • SECTION L. THE FARM GARDEN
      • Fig. 225. How to lay out the Garden[1]
  • CHAPTER IX
  • FEED STUFFS
    • SECTION LI. GRASSES
    • SECTION LII. LEGUMES
    • Descriptive Table
  • CHAPTER X
    • DOMESTIC ANIMALS
    • SECTION LIII. HORSES
      • Diagram shows the proper shape of the fore and hind legs of a horse. When the straight lines divide the legs equally, the leg action is straight and regular
    • Proportions of a Horse
    • SECTION LIV. CATTLE
    • SECTION LV. SHEEP
    • SECTION LVI. SWINE
    • SECTION LVII. FARM POULTRY
    • SECTION LVIII. BEE CULTURE
    • SECTION LIX. WHY WE FEED ANIMALS
      • What these Compounds do in the Body
  • CHAPTER XI
  • FARM DAIRYING
    • SECTION LX. THE DAIRY COW
    • SECTION LXI. MILK, CREAM, CHURNING, AND BUTTER
    • Dairy Rules
    • SECTION LXII. HOW MILK SOURS
      • At the left, pure milk; at the right, milk after standing in a warm room for a few hours in a dirty dish, showing, besides the fat-globules, many forms of bacteria
    • SECTION LXIII. THE BABCOCK MILK-TESTER
      • The tester, acid, acid measure, test-bottle, and thermometer at bottom; filling the pipette on right; adding the acid and measuring the fat at top
  • CHAPTER XII
  • MISCELLANEOUS
    • SECTION LXIV. GROWING FEED STUFFS ON THE FARM
    • SECTION LXV. FARM TOOLS AND MACHINES
    • SECTION LXVI. LIMING THE LAND
    • SECTION LXVII. BIRDS
    • SECTION LXVIII. FARMING ON DRY LANDS
    • SECTION LXIX. IRRIGATION
    • Methods of Irrigating Crops
    • SECTION LXX. LIFE IN THE COUNTRY
  • APPENDIX
  • SPRAYING MIXTURES
    • FOR BITING INSECTS
    • FOR SOFT-BODIED SUCKING INSECTS
    • FOR FUNGOUS DISEASES
    • SPRAYS FOR BOTH FUNGOUS AND INSECT PESTS
      • Self-Boiled Lime-Sulphur Wash
  • GLOSSARY
  • INDEX
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