Oxford Teaching Guides: How To Teach Grammar
$21.75

Oxford Teaching Guides: How To Teach Grammar

By Ian Cushing, Richard Hudson, Bas Aarts, Nick Rowles, Andrew Crampton, Catherine Owen, Carol Tear, Dan McGowan, Emma Poole, Philip Leftwich, James Penny, Rose Griffiths, Jenni Back, Sue Gifford
US$ 21.75
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Book Description

How To Teach Grammar offers accessible and authoritative advice and guidance on teaching grammar. It covers both subject knowledge and classroom practice, providing practical recommendations to help English teachers improve their own depth of understanding of grammar, and their confidence and ability to deliver successful grammar teaching.

Table of Contents
  • Contents
  • Introduction
  • Part 1: Subject knowledge
    • 1 Words
      • 1.1 The three tools of grammar
      • 1.2 The scope of grammar
      • 1.3 Word classes
      • 1.4 Inflectional morphology
      • 1.5 Syntax
      • 1.6 Derivational morphology
      • 1.7 Growing words at school
    • 2 Word classes and phrases
      • 2.1 Word classes
      • 2.2 Nouns and noun phrases
      • 2.3 Pronouns
      • 2.4 Determiners
      • 2.5 Adjectives and adjective phrases
      • 2.6 Prepositions and preposition phrases
      • 2.7 Verbs
      • 2.8 Adverbs and adverb phrases
      • 2.9 Coordinating conjunctions and subordinating conjunctions
    • 3 Clauses
      • 3.1 What is a clause?
      • 3.2 Main and subordinate clauses
      • 3.3 Clause types
      • 3.4 Finite and nonfinite clauses
    • 4 Grammatical functions
      • 4.1 Grammatical form
      • 4.2 Grammatical functions
      • 4.3 Subject
      • 4.4 Direct Object
      • 4.5 Indirect Object
      • 4.6 Adverbial
      • 4.7 Complement
      • 4.8 Modifier
      • 4.9 Visualising the structure of sentences
      • 4.10 A closer look at form and function in English grammar
    • 5 Grammar and meaning
      • 5.1 From grammar to meaning
      • 5.2 Sense and referent
      • 5.3 Denotation and connotation
      • 5.4 Anaphora
      • 5.5 Deixis
      • 5.6 Lexical meaning
      • 5.7 Flexible meaning
      • 5.8 Meaning created by derivational morphology
      • 5.9 Meaning created by inflectional morphology
      • 5.10 Meaning created by syntax
      • 5.11 Modality
      • 5.12 Meaning and communication
  • Part 2: Classroom practice
    • 6 Building
      • 6.1 Creating worlds from words
      • 6.2 The building blocks of fictional worlds
      • 6.3 Fictional worlds in advertising
    • 7 Foregrounding
      • 7.1 Finding patterns
      • 7.2 Foregrounding in poetry
      • 7.3 Deviation and parallelism
      • 7.4 Activity: talking about grammar
      • 7.5 Activity: noticing patterns
    • 8 Mapping
      • 8.1 Meaning and mapping in the mind
      • 8.2 Orientating a scene
      • 8.3 Mapping a scene
      • 8.4 In time, out of time, and behind time
      • 8.5 Prepositions in political discourse
      • 8.6 Playing with time and place
    • 9 Cohesion
      • 9.1 Text
      • 9.2 Grammatical cohesion
      • 9.3 Lexical cohesion
      • 9.4 An extended example
    • 10 Authority
      • 10.1 Displacement
      • 10.2 Authoritative grammar and the London Underground
      • 10.3 Deixis: pointing, showing, and tracking
    • 11 Doing, thinking, saying, and being
      • 11.1 Verbs and meaning
      • 11.2 Verbs in poetry
      • 11.3 Energy transfer
      • 11.4 Verbs in literary fiction
    • 12 Actions and agents
      • 12.1 Choice and construal
      • 12.2 Applying
      • 12.3 An extended analysis and rewrite
      • 12.4 Re-construing the immigration discourse
    • 13 Creating meaning
      • 13.1 Grammar as choice
      • 13.2 Creating characters
      • 13.3 Applying to writing
    • 14 The language of conversation
      • 14.1 What is special about conversational spoken English?
      • 14.2 The lexis and grammar of conversational spoken English
      • 14.3 Try some conversation analysis yourself
    • 15 Grammar and spelling
      • 15.1 Analysis
      • 15.2 Homophones
      • 15.3 Word families
      • 15.4 Word classes
      • 15.5 Spelling rules
    • 16 Punctuation
      • 16.1 What’s the point of punctuation?
      • 16.2 Global punctuation
      • 16.3 Sentences and ‘sentence punctuation’
      • 16.4 Intentions and ‘sentence punctuation’
      • 16.5 Counting punctuation
    • 17 Viewpoint
      • 17.1 Whose viewpoint?
      • 17.2 Reported speech and thoughts
      • 17.3 Hidden evaluations
    • 18 Variation
      • 18.1 Variation
      • 18.2 Written or spoken
      • 18.3 Grammatical or ungrammatical
      • 18.4 Standard or non-Standard
      • 18.5 Trendiness
      • 18.6 Old or new
  • Glossary
  • Index
  • Acknowledgements
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