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The Federalist Papers
Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, James Madison
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The Federalist Papers
Description
Contents
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Eighty-five articles written by a group of U.S. Founding Fathers on why the proposed U.S. Constitution should be approved.

Language
English
ISBN
Unknown
Titlepage
Imprint
Introduction
The Text of the Federalist
The Federalist Papers
I: General Introduction
II: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
III: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence)
IV: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence)
V: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence)
VI: Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States
VII: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States)
VIII: The Consequences of Hostilities Between the States
IX: The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection
X: The Same Subject Continued (The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection)
XI: The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy
XII: The Utility of the Union in Respect to Revenue
XIII: Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government
XIV: Objections to the Proposed Constitution from Extent of Territory Answered
XV: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
XVI: The Same Subject Continued (The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union)
XVII: The Same Subject Continued (The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union)
XVIII: The Same Subject Continued (The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union)
XIX: The Same Subject Continued (The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union)
XX: The Same Subject Continued (The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union)
XXI: Other Defects of the Present Confederation
XXII: The Same Subject Continued (Other Defects of the Present Confederation)
XXIII: The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union
XXIV: The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered
XXV: The Same Subject Continued (The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered)
XXVI: The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered
XXVII: The Same Subject Continued (The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered)
XXVIII: The Same Subject Continued (The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered)
XXIX: Concerning the Militia
XXX: Concerning the General Power of Taxation
XXXI: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning the General Power of Taxation)
XXXII: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning the General Power of Taxation)
XXXIII: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning the General Power of Taxation)
XXXIV: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning the General Power of Taxation)
XXXV: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning the General Power of Taxation)
XXXVI: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning the General Power of Taxation)
XXXVII: Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government
XXXVIII: The Same Subject Continued, and the Incoherence of the Objections to the New Plan Exposed
XXXIX: The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles
XL: On the Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained
XLI: General View of the Powers Conferred by the Constitution
XLII: The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered
XLIII: The Same Subject Continued (The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered)
XLIV: Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States
XLV: The Alleged Danger from the Powers of the Union to the State Governments
XLVI: The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared
XLVII: The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts
XLVIII: These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other
XLIX: Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention
L: Periodical Appeals to the People Considered
LI: The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments
LII: The House of Representatives
LIII: The Same Subject Continued (The House of Representatives)
LIV: The Apportionment of Members Among the States
LV: The Total Number of the House of Representatives
LVI: The Same Subject Continued (The Total Number of the House of Representatives)
LVII: The Alleged Tendency of the New Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many Considered in Connection with Representation
LVIII: Objection That the Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands
LIX: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members
LX: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members)
LXI: The Same Subject Continued (Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members)
LXII: The Senate
LXIII: The Senate Continued
LXIV: The Powers of the Senate
LXV: The Powers of the Senate Continued
LXVI: Objections to the Power of the Senate to Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered
LXVII: The Executive Department
LXVIII: The Mode of Electing the President
LXIX: The Real Character of the Executive
LXX: The Executive Department Further Considered
LXXI: The Duration in Office of the Executive
LXXII: The Same Subject Continued, and Re-Eligibility of the Executive Considered
LXXIII: The Provision for the Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power
LXXIV: The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Executive
LXXV: The Treaty-Making Power of the Executive
LXXVI: The Appointing Power of the Executive
LXXVII: The Appointing Power Continued and Other Powers of the Executive Considered
LXXVIII: The Judiciary Department
LXXIX: The Judiciary Continued
LXXX: The Powers of the Judiciary
LXXXI: The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority
LXXXII: The Judiciary Continued
LXXXIII: The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury
LXXXIV: Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered
LXXXV: Concluding Remarks
Endnotes
Colophon
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