Heads and Tales : or, Anecdotes and Stories of Quadrupeds and Other Beasts, Chiefly Connected with Incidents in the Histories of More or Less Distinguished Men.
Free
Heads and Tales : or, Anecdotes and Stories of Quadrupeds and Other Beasts, Chiefly Connected with Incidents in the Histories of More or Less Distinguished Men.
By Unknown
Free
Book Description

Table of Contents
  • HEADS AND TALES;
  • OR,
  • ANECDOTES AND STORIES OF QUADRUPEDS AND OTHER BEASTS,
    • CHIEFLY CONNECTED WITH INCIDENTS IN THE HISTORIES OF MORE OR LESS DISTINGUISHED MEN.
      • COMPILED AND SELECTED BY
    • COMPILED AND SELECTED BY
  • ADAM WHITE,
    • LATE ASSISTANT IN THE ZOOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT, BRITISH MUSEUM.
  • PREFACE.
  • CONTENTS.
  • HEADS AND TALES.
  • MAN.
    • Thomas Gainsborough the Artist, and the Tailor.
      • Sir David Wilkie and the Baby.
      • Man Defined Somewhat in the Linnæan Manner.
      • Addison and Steele on some of the Peculiarities of the Natural History Collectors of the day.
    • Sir David Wilkie and the Baby.
    • Man Defined Somewhat in the Linnæan Manner.
    • Addison and Steele on some of the Peculiarities of the Natural History Collectors of the day.
  • MONKEYS.
    • The Gorilla and its Story.
      • Mr Mitchell on a Young Chimpanzee.
      • Lady Anne Barnard pleads for the Baboons.
      • S. Bisset and his Trained Monkeys.
      • Lord Byron's Pets.
      • The Ettrick Shepherd's Monkey.
      • The Findhorn Fisherman and the Monkey.
      • The French Marquis and his Monkey.
      • The Mandrill and George the Fourth.
      • The Young Lady's Pet Monkey and her Parrot.
      • Monkeys Poor Relations.
      • Mrs Colin Mackenzie observes Apes at Simla.[21]
      • The Aye-Aye (Chiromys Madagascariensis).
    • Mr Mitchell on a Young Chimpanzee.
    • Lady Anne Barnard pleads for the Baboons.
    • S. Bisset and his Trained Monkeys.
    • Lord Byron's Pets.
    • The Ettrick Shepherd's Monkey.
    • The Findhorn Fisherman and the Monkey.
    • The French Marquis and his Monkey.
    • The Mandrill and George the Fourth.
    • The Young Lady's Pet Monkey and her Parrot.
    • Monkeys Poor Relations.
    • Mrs Colin Mackenzie observes Apes at Simla.[21]
    • The Aye-Aye (Chiromys Madagascariensis).
  • BATS.
    • Captain Cook's Sailor and His Description of a Fox-Bat.
      • Fox-Bats (Pteropus).
      • Dr Mayerne and His Balsam of Bats.
    • Fox-Bats (Pteropus).
    • Dr Mayerne and His Balsam of Bats.
  • HEDGEHOG.
    • Southey and his Critics.
  • MOLE.
    • The Mole and King William.
  • BEARS.
    • An Austrian General and a Bear.[30]
      • Byron's Bear at Cambridge.
      • Charles Dickens on Bears' Grease and its Producers.
      • A Bearable Pun.
      • Shaved Bear.
      • The Polar Bear.
      • Nelson and the Polar Bear.
      • A Clever Polar Bear.
      • Captain Ommaney and the Polar Bear.
    • Byron's Bear at Cambridge.
    • Charles Dickens on Bears' Grease and its Producers.
    • A Bearable Pun.
    • Shaved Bear.
    • The Polar Bear.
    • Nelson and the Polar Bear.
    • A Clever Polar Bear.
    • Captain Ommaney and the Polar Bear.
  • RACCOON.
  • BADGER.
    • Hugh Miller and the Badger-Baiting in the Canongate.
      • The Laird of Balnamoon and the Brock.
    • The Laird of Balnamoon and the Brock.
  • FERRET.
    • Collins and the Rat-catchers grip of his Ferrets.
  • POLE-CAT.
    • Fox and the Pole-Cat.—(Poll-cat.)[46]
  • DOGS.
    • Bishop Blomfield bitten by a Dog.
      • "Puppies never See till they are Nine Days Old."
      • Mrs Elizabeth Barrett Browning's dog Flush.
      • Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, Bart., and his dog "Speaker."
      • Lord Byron and his dog Boatswain.
      • "Perchance"—a Lady's reason for so naming her Dog.
      • Collins the Artist and his dog "Prinny"—a model of "a model."
      • The Soldier and the Mastiff.
      • Bark and Bite.
      • Mrs Drew and the Two Dogs.
      • (a curiously near approach to moral perception.)
      • The Difference of Exchange.—"Dog-cheap."
      • Gainsborough and his Wife and their Dogs.
      • Sir William Gell's Dog.
      • Elizabeth, the last Duchess of Gordon, and the Wolf-dog Kaiser.
      • Frederick the Great and his Italian Greyhounds.
      • The Dog and the French Murderers. (an occurrence in the spring of 1837.)
      • Robert Hall and the Dog.
      • A Queen and her Lap-dog.
      • The Clever Dog that belonged to the Hunters of Polmood.
      • The Irish Clergyman and the Dogs.
      • Washington Irving and the Dog.
      • Douglas Jerrold and his Dog.
      • Sheridan and the Dog.
      • Charles Lamb and his Dog.
      • French Dogs, time of Louis XI.—History of his dog "Relais" by Louis XII.
      • Martin Luther observes a Dog at Lintz.
      • The Poor Dog at the Grotta del Cane.
      • Dog, a Postman and Carrier.
      • Dog-matic.
      • General Moreau and his Greyhound.
      • A Duke of Norfolk and his Spaniels.
      • Lord North and the Dog.
      • Perthes derives Hints From his Dog.
      • Peter the Great and his favourite dog Lisette.
      • The Light Company's Poodle and Sir F. Ponsonby.
      • Admiral Rodney and his dog Loup.
      • Ruddiman and his dog Rascal.
      • Sheridan on the Dog-Tax.
      • Sydney Smith dislikes Dogs.
      • an ingenious way of getting rid of them.
      • Sydney Smith on Dogs.[97]
      • Sydney Smith's "Newfoundland Dog that breakfasted on Parish Boys."
      • Southey on Dogs.
      • Dog, a Good Judge of Elocution.
      • Cowper's dog Beau and the Water-Lily.
      • illustrated by the story of as intelligent a dog.
      • Horace Walpole's pet dog Rosette.
      • Arrival of Tonton, a pet dog, to Walpole.—Tonton does not understand English.
      • Horace Walpole.—Death of his dog Tonton.
      • Archbishop Whately and his Dogs.
      • Sir David Wilkie could not see a Pun.—"A Dog-Rose."
      • Ulysses and his Dog.
    • "Puppies never See till they are Nine Days Old."
    • Mrs Elizabeth Barrett Browning's dog Flush.
    • Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, Bart., and his dog "Speaker."
    • Lord Byron and his dog Boatswain.
    • "Perchance"—a Lady's reason for so naming her Dog.
    • Collins the Artist and his dog "Prinny"—a model of "a model."
    • The Soldier and the Mastiff.
    • Bark and Bite.
    • Mrs Drew and the Two Dogs.
    • (a curiously near approach to moral perception.)
    • The Difference of Exchange.—"Dog-cheap."
    • Gainsborough and his Wife and their Dogs.
    • Sir William Gell's Dog.
    • Elizabeth, the last Duchess of Gordon, and the Wolf-dog Kaiser.
    • Frederick the Great and his Italian Greyhounds.
    • The Dog and the French Murderers. (an occurrence in the spring of 1837.)
    • Robert Hall and the Dog.
    • A Queen and her Lap-dog.
    • The Clever Dog that belonged to the Hunters of Polmood.
    • The Irish Clergyman and the Dogs.
    • Washington Irving and the Dog.
    • Douglas Jerrold and his Dog.
    • Sheridan and the Dog.
    • Charles Lamb and his Dog.
    • French Dogs, time of Louis XI.—History of his dog "Relais" by Louis XII.
    • Martin Luther observes a Dog at Lintz.
    • The Poor Dog at the Grotta del Cane.
    • Dog, a Postman and Carrier.
    • Dog-matic.
    • General Moreau and his Greyhound.
    • A Duke of Norfolk and his Spaniels.
    • Lord North and the Dog.
    • Perthes derives Hints From his Dog.
    • Peter the Great and his favourite dog Lisette.
    • The Light Company's Poodle and Sir F. Ponsonby.
    • Admiral Rodney and his dog Loup.
    • Ruddiman and his dog Rascal.
    • Sheridan on the Dog-Tax.
    • Sydney Smith dislikes Dogs.
    • an ingenious way of getting rid of them.
    • Sydney Smith on Dogs.[97]
    • Sydney Smith's "Newfoundland Dog that breakfasted on Parish Boys."
    • Southey on Dogs.
    • Dog, a Good Judge of Elocution.
    • Cowper's dog Beau and the Water-Lily.
    • illustrated by the story of as intelligent a dog.
    • Horace Walpole's pet dog Rosette.
    • Arrival of Tonton, a pet dog, to Walpole.—Tonton does not understand English.
    • Horace Walpole.—Death of his dog Tonton.
    • Archbishop Whately and his Dogs.
    • Sir David Wilkie could not see a Pun.—"A Dog-Rose."
    • Ulysses and his Dog.
  • WOLF.
    • Polson and the last Scottish Wolf.
  • FOX.
    • An Enthusiastic Fox-Hunting Surgeon.[113]
      • Fox-Hunting.
      • Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus).
    • Fox-Hunting.
    • Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus).
  • JACKAL.
    • Jackal and Tiger.
  • CATS.
    • Jeremy Bentham and his pet Cat "Sir John Langborn."
      • Bisset and his Musical Cats.
      • Constant, Chateaubriand, and the Cat.
      • Liston the Surgeon and his Cat.
      • The Banker Mitchell's Antipathy to Kittens.
      • DONE INTO ENGLISH.
      • Sir Walter Scott's Visit to the Black Dwarf.—David Ritchie's Cat.
      • Archbishop Whately's Anecdote of the Cat that used to Ring the Bell.
    • Bisset and his Musical Cats.
    • Constant, Chateaubriand, and the Cat.
    • Liston the Surgeon and his Cat.
    • The Banker Mitchell's Antipathy to Kittens.
    • DONE INTO ENGLISH.
    • Sir Walter Scott's Visit to the Black Dwarf.—David Ritchie's Cat.
    • Archbishop Whately's Anecdote of the Cat that used to Ring the Bell.
  • TIGER AND LION.
    • Bussapa, the Tiger-slayer, and the Tiger.
      • John Hunter and the Dead Tiger.
      • Tigers.
      • Lion and Tiger.
      • Androcles and the Lion.
      • Sir George Davis and the Lion
      • Canova's Lions and the Child.
      • Admiral Napier and the Lion in the Tower.
      • Old Lady and the Beasts on the Mound.
    • John Hunter and the Dead Tiger.
    • Tigers.
    • Lion and Tiger.
    • Androcles and the Lion.
    • Sir George Davis and the Lion
    • Canova's Lions and the Child.
    • Admiral Napier and the Lion in the Tower.
    • Old Lady and the Beasts on the Mound.
  • SEALS.
    • Dr Adam Clarke on Shetland Seals.
      • Dr Edmonston on Shetland Seals.
      • The Walrus.
    • Dr Edmonston on Shetland Seals.
    • The Walrus.
  • KANGAROOS.
    • Kangaroo Cooke.
  • THE TIGER-WOLF.
  • SQUIRREL: ARCTIC LEMMING.
    • Pets of some of the Revolutionary Butchers. A Squirrel.
      • Arctic Voyager and the Lemming.
    • Arctic Voyager and the Lemming.
  • RATS AND MICE.
    • The Duke of Wellington and the Musk-rat.
      • Lady Eglintoun and the Rats.
      • General Douglas and the Rats.
      • Hanover Rats.
      • Irishman Employed Shooting Rats.
      • James Watt and the Rat's Whiskers.
      • The Poet Gray compares the Poet-Laureate to a Rat-catcher.
      • Jeremy Bentham and the Mice.
      • Burns and the Field Mouse.
      • TO A MOUSE, ON TURNING UP HER NEST WITH THE PLOUGH, NOVEMBER 1785.
      • Destructive Field Mice.
      • The Baron Von Trenck and the Tame Mouse in Prison.
      • Alexander Wilson and the Mouse.
    • Lady Eglintoun and the Rats.
    • General Douglas and the Rats.
    • Hanover Rats.
    • Irishman Employed Shooting Rats.
    • James Watt and the Rat's Whiskers.
    • The Poet Gray compares the Poet-Laureate to a Rat-catcher.
    • Jeremy Bentham and the Mice.
    • Burns and the Field Mouse.
    • TO A MOUSE, ON TURNING UP HER NEST WITH THE PLOUGH, NOVEMBER 1785.
    • Destructive Field Mice.
    • The Baron Von Trenck and the Tame Mouse in Prison.
    • Alexander Wilson and the Mouse.
  • HARES, RABBITS, GUINEA-PIG.
    • William Cowper on his Hares.
      • Hairs or Hares!
      • S. Bisset and his trained Hare and Turtle.
      • A Family of Rabbits all Blind of one Eye.
      • Thomas Fuller on Norfolk Rabbits.
      • Dr Chalmers and the Guinea-Pig.
    • Hairs or Hares!
    • S. Bisset and his trained Hare and Turtle.
    • A Family of Rabbits all Blind of one Eye.
    • Thomas Fuller on Norfolk Rabbits.
    • Dr Chalmers and the Guinea-Pig.
  • SLOTH.
    • Reverend Sydney Smith on the Sloth.
  • THE GREAT ANT-EATER.
  • RHINOCEROS AND ELEPHANT.
    • The Lord Keeper Guilford and his Visit to the Rhinoceros in the City of London.[188]
      • The Elephant and his Trunk.
      • Sir Richard Phillips and Jelly made of Ivory Dust.—A Vegetarian taken in.
      • J. T. Smith and the Elephant.
      • The Elephant and the Tailor.
      • Dr Johnson alluded to as "an Elephant."
      • Elephant's Skin.
    • The Elephant and his Trunk.
    • Sir Richard Phillips and Jelly made of Ivory Dust.—A Vegetarian taken in.
    • J. T. Smith and the Elephant.
    • The Elephant and the Tailor.
    • Dr Johnson alluded to as "an Elephant."
    • Elephant's Skin.
  • FOSSIL PACHYDERMATA.
    • Cuvier and the Fossil.
  • SOW.
    • The Wild Boar (Sus scrofa).
      • The River Pig, or Painted Pig of the Camaroon.[200]
      • S. Bisset and his Learned Pig.
      • Quixote Bowles fond of Pigs.
      • On Jekyll nearly thrown down by a very small Pig.
      • Good Enough for a Pig.
      • The Countryman's Criticism on the Pigs in Gainsborough's Picture of the Girl and Pigs.
      • Hook and the Litter of Pigs.
      • Jests about Swine.
      • Pigs and Silver Spoon.
      • Sydney Smith on Beautiful Pigs.
      • definition of beauty by a utilitarian.
      • Joseph Sturge, when a boy, and the Pigs.
    • The River Pig, or Painted Pig of the Camaroon.[200]
    • S. Bisset and his Learned Pig.
    • Quixote Bowles fond of Pigs.
    • On Jekyll nearly thrown down by a very small Pig.
    • Good Enough for a Pig.
    • The Countryman's Criticism on the Pigs in Gainsborough's Picture of the Girl and Pigs.
    • Hook and the Litter of Pigs.
    • Jests about Swine.
    • Pigs and Silver Spoon.
    • Sydney Smith on Beautiful Pigs.
    • definition of beauty by a utilitarian.
    • Joseph Sturge, when a boy, and the Pigs.
  • HORSE.
    • Bell-Rock Horse.
      • Burke and the Horse.
      • David Garrick and his Horse.
      • Bernard Gilpin's Horses Stolen and Recovered.[220]
      • The Herald and George III.'s Horse.
      • Rowland Hill and his Horse at Dunbar.
      • A Saying of Rowland Hill's.
      • Holcroft on the Horse.
      • A Joke of Lord Mansfield's about a Horse.
      • General Sir John Moore and his Horse at the Battle of Corunna.
      • Neither Horses nor Children can explain their Complaints.
      • Horses with Names.
      • "Old Jack" of Waterloo Bridge.
      • Sydney Smith and his Horses.
      • Judge Story and the Names he gave his Horses.
      • Wordsworth on Cruelty to Horses in Ireland.
      • Use of Tail.—Short-Tailed and Long-Tailed Horses.
    • Burke and the Horse.
    • David Garrick and his Horse.
    • Bernard Gilpin's Horses Stolen and Recovered.[220]
    • The Herald and George III.'s Horse.
    • Rowland Hill and his Horse at Dunbar.
    • A Saying of Rowland Hill's.
    • Holcroft on the Horse.
    • A Joke of Lord Mansfield's about a Horse.
    • General Sir John Moore and his Horse at the Battle of Corunna.
    • Neither Horses nor Children can explain their Complaints.
    • Horses with Names.
    • "Old Jack" of Waterloo Bridge.
    • Sydney Smith and his Horses.
    • Judge Story and the Names he gave his Horses.
    • Wordsworth on Cruelty to Horses in Ireland.
    • Use of Tail.—Short-Tailed and Long-Tailed Horses.
  • ASS AND ZEBRA.
    • Collins and the Old Donkey of Odell, Cowper's Messenger at Olney.
      • Gainsborough kept an Ass.
      • Irishman on the Ramsgate Donkeys.
      • Ass's Foal.
      • Ass.
      • Warren Hastings and the Refractory Donkey.
      • Northcote, the Royal Academician, an Angel at an Ass.
      • Sydney Smith's accomplished Donkey, with Francis Jeffrey on his Back.
      • Sydney Smith on the Sagacity of the Ass; a Lady scarcely so wise as one.
      • Asses' Duty Free!
      • Thackeray and the Egyptian Donkey.
      • Best to let Mules have their own Way.
      • Zebra.—"Un âne rayée."
      • a frenchman's "double-entendre."
    • Gainsborough kept an Ass.
    • Irishman on the Ramsgate Donkeys.
    • Ass's Foal.
    • Ass.
    • Warren Hastings and the Refractory Donkey.
    • Northcote, the Royal Academician, an Angel at an Ass.
    • Sydney Smith's accomplished Donkey, with Francis Jeffrey on his Back.
    • Sydney Smith on the Sagacity of the Ass; a Lady scarcely so wise as one.
    • Asses' Duty Free!
    • Thackeray and the Egyptian Donkey.
    • Best to let Mules have their own Way.
    • Zebra.—"Un âne rayée."
    • a frenchman's "double-entendre."
  • CAMEL.
    • Captain William Peel, R.N. Remarks on Camels.
      • A Captain in the Royal Navy Measures the Progress of "the Ship of the Desert."
      • Lord Metcalfe on a Camel when a Boy.
    • A Captain in the Royal Navy Measures the Progress of "the Ship of the Desert."
    • Lord Metcalfe on a Camel when a Boy.
  • STAGS AND GIRAFFE.
    • Earl of Dalhousie and the ferocious Stag.
      • The French Count and the Stag.
      • Venison Fat.—Reynolds and the Gourmand.
      • Stag-trench at Frankfort-on-the-Maine.
      • Giraffe.
    • The French Count and the Stag.
    • Venison Fat.—Reynolds and the Gourmand.
    • Stag-trench at Frankfort-on-the-Maine.
    • Giraffe.
  • SHEEP AND GOATS.
    • How many Legs has a Sheep?
      • Goethe on Roos's Etchings of Sheep.
      • Lord Cockburn and the Sheep.
      • Woolsack.
      • Sandy Wood and his Pets, a Sheep and a Raven.
      • General Carnac and his She-goat.
      • John Hunter and the Shawl-Goat.
      • hunter's method of introducing strange animals peacefully to others in his menagerie.
      • Commodore Keppel "beards" the Dey of Algiers.—A Goat.
    • Goethe on Roos's Etchings of Sheep.
    • Lord Cockburn and the Sheep.
    • Woolsack.
    • Sandy Wood and his Pets, a Sheep and a Raven.
    • General Carnac and his She-goat.
    • John Hunter and the Shawl-Goat.
    • hunter's method of introducing strange animals peacefully to others in his menagerie.
    • Commodore Keppel "beards" the Dey of Algiers.—A Goat.
  • CALVES AND KINE.
    • A Great Calf.
      • Rather too much of a Good Thing.—Veal ad nauseam.
      • Adam Clarke and his Bullock Pat.
      • Samuel Foote and the Cows Pulling the Bell of Worcester College Chapel.
      • The General's Cow.
      • Gilpin's Love of the Picturesque carried out.—A Reason for keeping Three Cows.
      • King James on a Cow getting over the Border.
      • Duke of Montague and his Hospital for old Cows and Horses.
      • Philip IV. of Spain in the Bull-ring.
      • Sydney Smith and his Cattle.—His "Universal Scratcher."
      • Rev. Augustus Toplady on the Future State of Animals.
      • Right Honourable William Windham, M.P., on the Feelings of a Baited Bull.
    • Rather too much of a Good Thing.—Veal ad nauseam.
    • Adam Clarke and his Bullock Pat.
    • Samuel Foote and the Cows Pulling the Bell of Worcester College Chapel.
    • The General's Cow.
    • Gilpin's Love of the Picturesque carried out.—A Reason for keeping Three Cows.
    • King James on a Cow getting over the Border.
    • Duke of Montague and his Hospital for old Cows and Horses.
    • Philip IV. of Spain in the Bull-ring.
    • Sydney Smith and his Cattle.—His "Universal Scratcher."
    • Rev. Augustus Toplady on the Future State of Animals.
    • Right Honourable William Windham, M.P., on the Feelings of a Baited Bull.
  • WHALES.
    • Whalebone.
      • Very like a Whale.
      • Christopher North on the Whale.
    • Very like a Whale.
    • Christopher North on the Whale.
  • INDEX.
    • THE END.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    No review for this book yet, be the first to review.
      No comment for this book yet, be the first to comment
      You May Also Like
      Also Available On
      App store smallGoogle play small
      Categories
      Curated Lists
      • Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning (Information Science and Statistics)
        by Christopher M. Bishop
        Data mining
        by I. H. Witten
        The Elements of Statistical Learning: Data Mining, Inference, and Prediction
        by Various
        See more...
      • CK-12 Chemistry
        by Various
        Concept Development Studies in Chemistry
        by John Hutchinson
        An Introduction to Chemistry - Atoms First
        by Mark Bishop
        See more...
      • Microsoft Word - How to Use Advanced Algebra II.doc
        by Jonathan Emmons
        Advanced Algebra II: Activities and Homework
        by Kenny Felder
        de2de
        by
        See more...
      • The Sun Who Lost His Way
        by
        Tania is a Detective
        by Kanika G
        Firenze_s-Light
        by
        See more...
      • Java 3D Programming
        by Daniel Selman
        The Java EE 6 Tutorial
        by Oracle Corporation
        JavaKid811
        by
        See more...