Heads and Tales : or, Anecdotes and Stories of Quadrupeds and Other Beasts, Chiefly Connected with Incidents in the Histories of More or Less Distinguished Men.
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Heads and Tales : or, Anecdotes and Stories of Quadrupeds and Other Beasts, Chiefly Connected with Incidents in the Histories of More or Less Distinguished Men.

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Table of Contents
  • HEADS AND TALES;
  • OR,
  • ANECDOTES AND STORIES OF QUADRUPEDS AND OTHER BEASTS,
    • CHIEFLY CONNECTED WITH INCIDENTS IN THE HISTORIES OF MORE OR LESS DISTINGUISHED MEN.
      • COMPILED AND SELECTED BY
    • COMPILED AND SELECTED BY
  • ADAM WHITE,
    • LATE ASSISTANT IN THE ZOOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT, BRITISH MUSEUM.
  • PREFACE.
  • CONTENTS.
  • HEADS AND TALES.
  • MAN.
    • Thomas Gainsborough the Artist, and the Tailor.
      • Sir David Wilkie and the Baby.
      • Man Defined Somewhat in the Linnæan Manner.
      • Addison and Steele on some of the Peculiarities of the Natural History Collectors of the day.
    • Sir David Wilkie and the Baby.
    • Man Defined Somewhat in the Linnæan Manner.
    • Addison and Steele on some of the Peculiarities of the Natural History Collectors of the day.
  • MONKEYS.
    • The Gorilla and its Story.
      • Mr Mitchell on a Young Chimpanzee.
      • Lady Anne Barnard pleads for the Baboons.
      • S. Bisset and his Trained Monkeys.
      • Lord Byron's Pets.
      • The Ettrick Shepherd's Monkey.
      • The Findhorn Fisherman and the Monkey.
      • The French Marquis and his Monkey.
      • The Mandrill and George the Fourth.
      • The Young Lady's Pet Monkey and her Parrot.
      • Monkeys Poor Relations.
      • Mrs Colin Mackenzie observes Apes at Simla.[21]
      • The Aye-Aye (Chiromys Madagascariensis).
    • Mr Mitchell on a Young Chimpanzee.
    • Lady Anne Barnard pleads for the Baboons.
    • S. Bisset and his Trained Monkeys.
    • Lord Byron's Pets.
    • The Ettrick Shepherd's Monkey.
    • The Findhorn Fisherman and the Monkey.
    • The French Marquis and his Monkey.
    • The Mandrill and George the Fourth.
    • The Young Lady's Pet Monkey and her Parrot.
    • Monkeys Poor Relations.
    • Mrs Colin Mackenzie observes Apes at Simla.[21]
    • The Aye-Aye (Chiromys Madagascariensis).
  • BATS.
    • Captain Cook's Sailor and His Description of a Fox-Bat.
      • Fox-Bats (Pteropus).
      • Dr Mayerne and His Balsam of Bats.
    • Fox-Bats (Pteropus).
    • Dr Mayerne and His Balsam of Bats.
  • HEDGEHOG.
    • Southey and his Critics.
  • MOLE.
    • The Mole and King William.
  • BEARS.
    • An Austrian General and a Bear.[30]
      • Byron's Bear at Cambridge.
      • Charles Dickens on Bears' Grease and its Producers.
      • A Bearable Pun.
      • Shaved Bear.
      • The Polar Bear.
      • Nelson and the Polar Bear.
      • A Clever Polar Bear.
      • Captain Ommaney and the Polar Bear.
    • Byron's Bear at Cambridge.
    • Charles Dickens on Bears' Grease and its Producers.
    • A Bearable Pun.
    • Shaved Bear.
    • The Polar Bear.
    • Nelson and the Polar Bear.
    • A Clever Polar Bear.
    • Captain Ommaney and the Polar Bear.
  • RACCOON.
  • BADGER.
    • Hugh Miller and the Badger-Baiting in the Canongate.
      • The Laird of Balnamoon and the Brock.
    • The Laird of Balnamoon and the Brock.
  • FERRET.
    • Collins and the Rat-catchers grip of his Ferrets.
  • POLE-CAT.
    • Fox and the Pole-Cat.—(Poll-cat.)[46]
  • DOGS.
    • Bishop Blomfield bitten by a Dog.
      • "Puppies never See till they are Nine Days Old."
      • Mrs Elizabeth Barrett Browning's dog Flush.
      • Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, Bart., and his dog "Speaker."
      • Lord Byron and his dog Boatswain.
      • "Perchance"—a Lady's reason for so naming her Dog.
      • Collins the Artist and his dog "Prinny"—a model of "a model."
      • The Soldier and the Mastiff.
      • Bark and Bite.
      • Mrs Drew and the Two Dogs.
      • (a curiously near approach to moral perception.)
      • The Difference of Exchange.—"Dog-cheap."
      • Gainsborough and his Wife and their Dogs.
      • Sir William Gell's Dog.
      • Elizabeth, the last Duchess of Gordon, and the Wolf-dog Kaiser.
      • Frederick the Great and his Italian Greyhounds.
      • The Dog and the French Murderers. (an occurrence in the spring of 1837.)
      • Robert Hall and the Dog.
      • A Queen and her Lap-dog.
      • The Clever Dog that belonged to the Hunters of Polmood.
      • The Irish Clergyman and the Dogs.
      • Washington Irving and the Dog.
      • Douglas Jerrold and his Dog.
      • Sheridan and the Dog.
      • Charles Lamb and his Dog.
      • French Dogs, time of Louis XI.—History of his dog "Relais" by Louis XII.
      • Martin Luther observes a Dog at Lintz.
      • The Poor Dog at the Grotta del Cane.
      • Dog, a Postman and Carrier.
      • Dog-matic.
      • General Moreau and his Greyhound.
      • A Duke of Norfolk and his Spaniels.
      • Lord North and the Dog.
      • Perthes derives Hints From his Dog.
      • Peter the Great and his favourite dog Lisette.
      • The Light Company's Poodle and Sir F. Ponsonby.
      • Admiral Rodney and his dog Loup.
      • Ruddiman and his dog Rascal.
      • Sheridan on the Dog-Tax.
      • Sydney Smith dislikes Dogs.
      • an ingenious way of getting rid of them.
      • Sydney Smith on Dogs.[97]
      • Sydney Smith's "Newfoundland Dog that breakfasted on Parish Boys."
      • Southey on Dogs.
      • Dog, a Good Judge of Elocution.
      • Cowper's dog Beau and the Water-Lily.
      • illustrated by the story of as intelligent a dog.
      • Horace Walpole's pet dog Rosette.
      • Arrival of Tonton, a pet dog, to Walpole.—Tonton does not understand English.
      • Horace Walpole.—Death of his dog Tonton.
      • Archbishop Whately and his Dogs.
      • Sir David Wilkie could not see a Pun.—"A Dog-Rose."
      • Ulysses and his Dog.
    • "Puppies never See till they are Nine Days Old."
    • Mrs Elizabeth Barrett Browning's dog Flush.
    • Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, Bart., and his dog "Speaker."
    • Lord Byron and his dog Boatswain.
    • "Perchance"—a Lady's reason for so naming her Dog.
    • Collins the Artist and his dog "Prinny"—a model of "a model."
    • The Soldier and the Mastiff.
    • Bark and Bite.
    • Mrs Drew and the Two Dogs.
    • (a curiously near approach to moral perception.)
    • The Difference of Exchange.—"Dog-cheap."
    • Gainsborough and his Wife and their Dogs.
    • Sir William Gell's Dog.
    • Elizabeth, the last Duchess of Gordon, and the Wolf-dog Kaiser.
    • Frederick the Great and his Italian Greyhounds.
    • The Dog and the French Murderers. (an occurrence in the spring of 1837.)
    • Robert Hall and the Dog.
    • A Queen and her Lap-dog.
    • The Clever Dog that belonged to the Hunters of Polmood.
    • The Irish Clergyman and the Dogs.
    • Washington Irving and the Dog.
    • Douglas Jerrold and his Dog.
    • Sheridan and the Dog.
    • Charles Lamb and his Dog.
    • French Dogs, time of Louis XI.—History of his dog "Relais" by Louis XII.
    • Martin Luther observes a Dog at Lintz.
    • The Poor Dog at the Grotta del Cane.
    • Dog, a Postman and Carrier.
    • Dog-matic.
    • General Moreau and his Greyhound.
    • A Duke of Norfolk and his Spaniels.
    • Lord North and the Dog.
    • Perthes derives Hints From his Dog.
    • Peter the Great and his favourite dog Lisette.
    • The Light Company's Poodle and Sir F. Ponsonby.
    • Admiral Rodney and his dog Loup.
    • Ruddiman and his dog Rascal.
    • Sheridan on the Dog-Tax.
    • Sydney Smith dislikes Dogs.
    • an ingenious way of getting rid of them.
    • Sydney Smith on Dogs.[97]
    • Sydney Smith's "Newfoundland Dog that breakfasted on Parish Boys."
    • Southey on Dogs.
    • Dog, a Good Judge of Elocution.
    • Cowper's dog Beau and the Water-Lily.
    • illustrated by the story of as intelligent a dog.
    • Horace Walpole's pet dog Rosette.
    • Arrival of Tonton, a pet dog, to Walpole.—Tonton does not understand English.
    • Horace Walpole.—Death of his dog Tonton.
    • Archbishop Whately and his Dogs.
    • Sir David Wilkie could not see a Pun.—"A Dog-Rose."
    • Ulysses and his Dog.
  • WOLF.
    • Polson and the last Scottish Wolf.
  • FOX.
    • An Enthusiastic Fox-Hunting Surgeon.[113]
      • Fox-Hunting.
      • Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus).
    • Fox-Hunting.
    • Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus).
  • JACKAL.
    • Jackal and Tiger.
  • CATS.
    • Jeremy Bentham and his pet Cat "Sir John Langborn."
      • Bisset and his Musical Cats.
      • Constant, Chateaubriand, and the Cat.
      • Liston the Surgeon and his Cat.
      • The Banker Mitchell's Antipathy to Kittens.
      • DONE INTO ENGLISH.
      • Sir Walter Scott's Visit to the Black Dwarf.—David Ritchie's Cat.
      • Archbishop Whately's Anecdote of the Cat that used to Ring the Bell.
    • Bisset and his Musical Cats.
    • Constant, Chateaubriand, and the Cat.
    • Liston the Surgeon and his Cat.
    • The Banker Mitchell's Antipathy to Kittens.
    • DONE INTO ENGLISH.
    • Sir Walter Scott's Visit to the Black Dwarf.—David Ritchie's Cat.
    • Archbishop Whately's Anecdote of the Cat that used to Ring the Bell.
  • TIGER AND LION.
    • Bussapa, the Tiger-slayer, and the Tiger.
      • John Hunter and the Dead Tiger.
      • Tigers.
      • Lion and Tiger.
      • Androcles and the Lion.
      • Sir George Davis and the Lion
      • Canova's Lions and the Child.
      • Admiral Napier and the Lion in the Tower.
      • Old Lady and the Beasts on the Mound.
    • John Hunter and the Dead Tiger.
    • Tigers.
    • Lion and Tiger.
    • Androcles and the Lion.
    • Sir George Davis and the Lion
    • Canova's Lions and the Child.
    • Admiral Napier and the Lion in the Tower.
    • Old Lady and the Beasts on the Mound.
  • SEALS.
    • Dr Adam Clarke on Shetland Seals.
      • Dr Edmonston on Shetland Seals.
      • The Walrus.
    • Dr Edmonston on Shetland Seals.
    • The Walrus.
  • KANGAROOS.
    • Kangaroo Cooke.
  • THE TIGER-WOLF.
  • SQUIRREL: ARCTIC LEMMING.
    • Pets of some of the Revolutionary Butchers. A Squirrel.
      • Arctic Voyager and the Lemming.
    • Arctic Voyager and the Lemming.
  • RATS AND MICE.
    • The Duke of Wellington and the Musk-rat.
      • Lady Eglintoun and the Rats.
      • General Douglas and the Rats.
      • Hanover Rats.
      • Irishman Employed Shooting Rats.
      • James Watt and the Rat's Whiskers.
      • The Poet Gray compares the Poet-Laureate to a Rat-catcher.
      • Jeremy Bentham and the Mice.
      • Burns and the Field Mouse.
      • TO A MOUSE, ON TURNING UP HER NEST WITH THE PLOUGH, NOVEMBER 1785.
      • Destructive Field Mice.
      • The Baron Von Trenck and the Tame Mouse in Prison.
      • Alexander Wilson and the Mouse.
    • Lady Eglintoun and the Rats.
    • General Douglas and the Rats.
    • Hanover Rats.
    • Irishman Employed Shooting Rats.
    • James Watt and the Rat's Whiskers.
    • The Poet Gray compares the Poet-Laureate to a Rat-catcher.
    • Jeremy Bentham and the Mice.
    • Burns and the Field Mouse.
    • TO A MOUSE, ON TURNING UP HER NEST WITH THE PLOUGH, NOVEMBER 1785.
    • Destructive Field Mice.
    • The Baron Von Trenck and the Tame Mouse in Prison.
    • Alexander Wilson and the Mouse.
  • HARES, RABBITS, GUINEA-PIG.
    • William Cowper on his Hares.
      • Hairs or Hares!
      • S. Bisset and his trained Hare and Turtle.
      • A Family of Rabbits all Blind of one Eye.
      • Thomas Fuller on Norfolk Rabbits.
      • Dr Chalmers and the Guinea-Pig.
    • Hairs or Hares!
    • S. Bisset and his trained Hare and Turtle.
    • A Family of Rabbits all Blind of one Eye.
    • Thomas Fuller on Norfolk Rabbits.
    • Dr Chalmers and the Guinea-Pig.
  • SLOTH.
    • Reverend Sydney Smith on the Sloth.
  • THE GREAT ANT-EATER.
  • RHINOCEROS AND ELEPHANT.
    • The Lord Keeper Guilford and his Visit to the Rhinoceros in the City of London.[188]
      • The Elephant and his Trunk.
      • Sir Richard Phillips and Jelly made of Ivory Dust.—A Vegetarian taken in.
      • J. T. Smith and the Elephant.
      • The Elephant and the Tailor.
      • Dr Johnson alluded to as "an Elephant."
      • Elephant's Skin.
    • The Elephant and his Trunk.
    • Sir Richard Phillips and Jelly made of Ivory Dust.—A Vegetarian taken in.
    • J. T. Smith and the Elephant.
    • The Elephant and the Tailor.
    • Dr Johnson alluded to as "an Elephant."
    • Elephant's Skin.
  • FOSSIL PACHYDERMATA.
    • Cuvier and the Fossil.
  • SOW.
    • The Wild Boar (Sus scrofa).
      • The River Pig, or Painted Pig of the Camaroon.[200]
      • S. Bisset and his Learned Pig.
      • Quixote Bowles fond of Pigs.
      • On Jekyll nearly thrown down by a very small Pig.
      • Good Enough for a Pig.
      • The Countryman's Criticism on the Pigs in Gainsborough's Picture of the Girl and Pigs.
      • Hook and the Litter of Pigs.
      • Jests about Swine.
      • Pigs and Silver Spoon.
      • Sydney Smith on Beautiful Pigs.
      • definition of beauty by a utilitarian.
      • Joseph Sturge, when a boy, and the Pigs.
    • The River Pig, or Painted Pig of the Camaroon.[200]
    • S. Bisset and his Learned Pig.
    • Quixote Bowles fond of Pigs.
    • On Jekyll nearly thrown down by a very small Pig.
    • Good Enough for a Pig.
    • The Countryman's Criticism on the Pigs in Gainsborough's Picture of the Girl and Pigs.
    • Hook and the Litter of Pigs.
    • Jests about Swine.
    • Pigs and Silver Spoon.
    • Sydney Smith on Beautiful Pigs.
    • definition of beauty by a utilitarian.
    • Joseph Sturge, when a boy, and the Pigs.
  • HORSE.
    • Bell-Rock Horse.
      • Burke and the Horse.
      • David Garrick and his Horse.
      • Bernard Gilpin's Horses Stolen and Recovered.[220]
      • The Herald and George III.'s Horse.
      • Rowland Hill and his Horse at Dunbar.
      • A Saying of Rowland Hill's.
      • Holcroft on the Horse.
      • A Joke of Lord Mansfield's about a Horse.
      • General Sir John Moore and his Horse at the Battle of Corunna.
      • Neither Horses nor Children can explain their Complaints.
      • Horses with Names.
      • "Old Jack" of Waterloo Bridge.
      • Sydney Smith and his Horses.
      • Judge Story and the Names he gave his Horses.
      • Wordsworth on Cruelty to Horses in Ireland.
      • Use of Tail.—Short-Tailed and Long-Tailed Horses.
    • Burke and the Horse.
    • David Garrick and his Horse.
    • Bernard Gilpin's Horses Stolen and Recovered.[220]
    • The Herald and George III.'s Horse.
    • Rowland Hill and his Horse at Dunbar.
    • A Saying of Rowland Hill's.
    • Holcroft on the Horse.
    • A Joke of Lord Mansfield's about a Horse.
    • General Sir John Moore and his Horse at the Battle of Corunna.
    • Neither Horses nor Children can explain their Complaints.
    • Horses with Names.
    • "Old Jack" of Waterloo Bridge.
    • Sydney Smith and his Horses.
    • Judge Story and the Names he gave his Horses.
    • Wordsworth on Cruelty to Horses in Ireland.
    • Use of Tail.—Short-Tailed and Long-Tailed Horses.
  • ASS AND ZEBRA.
    • Collins and the Old Donkey of Odell, Cowper's Messenger at Olney.
      • Gainsborough kept an Ass.
      • Irishman on the Ramsgate Donkeys.
      • Ass's Foal.
      • Ass.
      • Warren Hastings and the Refractory Donkey.
      • Northcote, the Royal Academician, an Angel at an Ass.
      • Sydney Smith's accomplished Donkey, with Francis Jeffrey on his Back.
      • Sydney Smith on the Sagacity of the Ass; a Lady scarcely so wise as one.
      • Asses' Duty Free!
      • Thackeray and the Egyptian Donkey.
      • Best to let Mules have their own Way.
      • Zebra.—"Un âne rayée."
      • a frenchman's "double-entendre."
    • Gainsborough kept an Ass.
    • Irishman on the Ramsgate Donkeys.
    • Ass's Foal.
    • Ass.
    • Warren Hastings and the Refractory Donkey.
    • Northcote, the Royal Academician, an Angel at an Ass.
    • Sydney Smith's accomplished Donkey, with Francis Jeffrey on his Back.
    • Sydney Smith on the Sagacity of the Ass; a Lady scarcely so wise as one.
    • Asses' Duty Free!
    • Thackeray and the Egyptian Donkey.
    • Best to let Mules have their own Way.
    • Zebra.—"Un âne rayée."
    • a frenchman's "double-entendre."
  • CAMEL.
    • Captain William Peel, R.N. Remarks on Camels.
      • A Captain in the Royal Navy Measures the Progress of "the Ship of the Desert."
      • Lord Metcalfe on a Camel when a Boy.
    • A Captain in the Royal Navy Measures the Progress of "the Ship of the Desert."
    • Lord Metcalfe on a Camel when a Boy.
  • STAGS AND GIRAFFE.
    • Earl of Dalhousie and the ferocious Stag.
      • The French Count and the Stag.
      • Venison Fat.—Reynolds and the Gourmand.
      • Stag-trench at Frankfort-on-the-Maine.
      • Giraffe.
    • The French Count and the Stag.
    • Venison Fat.—Reynolds and the Gourmand.
    • Stag-trench at Frankfort-on-the-Maine.
    • Giraffe.
  • SHEEP AND GOATS.
    • How many Legs has a Sheep?
      • Goethe on Roos's Etchings of Sheep.
      • Lord Cockburn and the Sheep.
      • Woolsack.
      • Sandy Wood and his Pets, a Sheep and a Raven.
      • General Carnac and his She-goat.
      • John Hunter and the Shawl-Goat.
      • hunter's method of introducing strange animals peacefully to others in his menagerie.
      • Commodore Keppel "beards" the Dey of Algiers.—A Goat.
    • Goethe on Roos's Etchings of Sheep.
    • Lord Cockburn and the Sheep.
    • Woolsack.
    • Sandy Wood and his Pets, a Sheep and a Raven.
    • General Carnac and his She-goat.
    • John Hunter and the Shawl-Goat.
    • hunter's method of introducing strange animals peacefully to others in his menagerie.
    • Commodore Keppel "beards" the Dey of Algiers.—A Goat.
  • CALVES AND KINE.
    • A Great Calf.
      • Rather too much of a Good Thing.—Veal ad nauseam.
      • Adam Clarke and his Bullock Pat.
      • Samuel Foote and the Cows Pulling the Bell of Worcester College Chapel.
      • The General's Cow.
      • Gilpin's Love of the Picturesque carried out.—A Reason for keeping Three Cows.
      • King James on a Cow getting over the Border.
      • Duke of Montague and his Hospital for old Cows and Horses.
      • Philip IV. of Spain in the Bull-ring.
      • Sydney Smith and his Cattle.—His "Universal Scratcher."
      • Rev. Augustus Toplady on the Future State of Animals.
      • Right Honourable William Windham, M.P., on the Feelings of a Baited Bull.
    • Rather too much of a Good Thing.—Veal ad nauseam.
    • Adam Clarke and his Bullock Pat.
    • Samuel Foote and the Cows Pulling the Bell of Worcester College Chapel.
    • The General's Cow.
    • Gilpin's Love of the Picturesque carried out.—A Reason for keeping Three Cows.
    • King James on a Cow getting over the Border.
    • Duke of Montague and his Hospital for old Cows and Horses.
    • Philip IV. of Spain in the Bull-ring.
    • Sydney Smith and his Cattle.—His "Universal Scratcher."
    • Rev. Augustus Toplady on the Future State of Animals.
    • Right Honourable William Windham, M.P., on the Feelings of a Baited Bull.
  • WHALES.
    • Whalebone.
      • Very like a Whale.
      • Christopher North on the Whale.
    • Very like a Whale.
    • Christopher North on the Whale.
  • INDEX.
    • THE END.
    • FOOTNOTES:
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