A History of Rome to 565 A. D.
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A History of Rome to 565 A. D.

By Arthur E. R. (Arthur Edward Romilly) Boak
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Book Description
Table of Contents
  • PREFACE
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
  • LIST OF MAPS
  • INTRODUCTION
  • The Sources for the Study of Early Roman History
  • PART I
  • THE FORERUNNERS OF ROME IN ITALY
    • CHAPTER I
    • THE GEOGRAPHY OF ITALY
    • CHAPTER II
    • PREHISTORIC CIVILIZATION IN ITALY
    • CHAPTER III
    • THE PEOPLES OF HISTORIC ITALY: THE ETRUSCANS; THE GREEKS
      • I. The Peoples of Italy
      • II. The Etruscans
      • III. The Greeks
    • I. The Peoples of Italy
    • II. The Etruscans
    • III. The Greeks
  • PART II
  • THE PRIMITIVE MONARCHY AND THE REPUBLIC: FROM PREHISTORIC TIMES TO 27 B. C.
    • CHAPTER IV
    • EARLY ROME TO THE FALL OF THE MONARCHY
      • I. The Latins
      • II. The Origins of Rome
      • III. The Early Monarchy
      • IV. Early Roman Society
    • I. The Latins
    • II. The Origins of Rome
    • III. The Early Monarchy
    • IV. Early Roman Society
    • CHAPTER V
    • THE EXPANSION OF ROME TO THE UNIFICATION OF THE ITALIAN PENINSULA: c. 509–265 B. C.
      • I. To the Conquest of Veii—392 b. c.
      • II. The Gallic Invasion
      • III. The Disruption of the Latin League and the Roman Alliance with the Campanians: 387–334 b. c.
      • IV. Wars with the Samnites, Gauls and Etruscans: 325–280 b. c.
      • V. The Roman Conquest of South Italy: 281–270 b. c.
      • VI. The Roman Confederacy
    • I. To the Conquest of Veii—392 b. c.
    • II. The Gallic Invasion
    • III. The Disruption of the Latin League and the Roman Alliance with the Campanians: 387–334 b. c.
    • IV. Wars with the Samnites, Gauls and Etruscans: 325–280 b. c.
    • V. The Roman Conquest of South Italy: 281–270 b. c.
    • VI. The Roman Confederacy
    • CHAPTER VI
    • THE CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF ROME TO 287 B. C.
      • I. The Early Republic
      • II. The Assembly of the Centuries and the Development of the Magistracy
      • III. The Plebeian Struggle for Political Equality
      • IV. The Roman Military System
    • I. The Early Republic
    • II. The Assembly of the Centuries and the Development of the Magistracy
    • III. The Plebeian Struggle for Political Equality
    • IV. The Roman Military System
    • CHAPTER VII
    • EARLY RELIGION AND SOCIETY
      • I. Early Roman Religion
      • II. Early Roman Society
    • I. Early Roman Religion
    • II. Early Roman Society
    • CHAPTER VIII
    • ROMAN DOMINATION IN THE MEDITERRANEAN; THE FIRST PHASE—THE STRUGGLE WITH CARTHAGE; 265–201 B. C.
      • I. The Mediterranean World in 265 b. c.
      • II. The First Punic War: 264–241 b. c.
      • III. The Illyrian and Gallic Wars: 229–219 b. c.
      • IV. The Second Punic War: 218–202 b. c.
      • V. The Effect of the Second Punic War upon Italy
    • I. The Mediterranean World in 265 b. c.
    • II. The First Punic War: 264–241 b. c.
    • III. The Illyrian and Gallic Wars: 229–219 b. c.
    • IV. The Second Punic War: 218–202 b. c.
    • V. The Effect of the Second Punic War upon Italy
    • CHAPTER IX
    • ROMAN DOMINATION IN THE MEDITERRANEAN
    • THE SECOND PHASE: ROME AND THE GREEK EAST, 200–167 B. C.
      • I. The Second Macedonian War: 200–196 b. c.
      • II. The War with Antiochus the Great and the Aetolians: 192–189 b. c.
      • III. The Third Macedonian War: 171–167 b. c.
      • IV. Campaigns in Italy and Spain
    • I. The Second Macedonian War: 200–196 b. c.
    • II. The War with Antiochus the Great and the Aetolians: 192–189 b. c.
    • III. The Third Macedonian War: 171–167 b. c.
    • IV. Campaigns in Italy and Spain
    • CHAPTER X
    • TERRITORIAL EXPANSION IN THREE CONTINENTS: 167–133 B. C.
      • I. The Spanish Wars: 154–133 b. c.
      • II. The Destruction of Carthage: 149–146 b. c.
      • III. War with Macedonia and the Achaean Confederacy: 149–146 b. c.
      • IV. The Acquisition of Asia
    • I. The Spanish Wars: 154–133 b. c.
    • II. The Destruction of Carthage: 149–146 b. c.
    • III. War with Macedonia and the Achaean Confederacy: 149–146 b. c.
    • IV. The Acquisition of Asia
    • CHAPTER XI
    • THE ROMAN STATE AND THE EMPIRE: 265–133 B. C.
      • I. The Rule of the Senatorial Aristocracy
      • II. The Administration of the Provinces
      • III. Social and Economic Development
      • IV. Cultural Progress
    • I. The Rule of the Senatorial Aristocracy
    • II. The Administration of the Provinces
    • III. Social and Economic Development
    • IV. Cultural Progress
    • CHAPTER XII
    • THE STRUGGLE OF THE OPTIMATES AND THE POPULARES: 133–78 B. C.
      • I. The Agrarian Laws of Tiberius Gracchus: 133 b. c.
      • II. The Tribunate of Caius Gracchus: 124–121 b. c.
      • III. The War with Jugurtha and the Rise of Marius
      • IV. The Invasion of the Cimbri and Teutons
      • V. Saturninus and Glaucia
      • VI. The Tribunate of Marcus Livius Drusus, 91 b. c.
      • VII. The Italian or Marsic War, 90–88 b. c.
      • VIII. The First Mithradatic War
      • IX. Sulla’s Dictatorship
    • I. The Agrarian Laws of Tiberius Gracchus: 133 b. c.
    • II. The Tribunate of Caius Gracchus: 124–121 b. c.
    • III. The War with Jugurtha and the Rise of Marius
    • IV. The Invasion of the Cimbri and Teutons
    • V. Saturninus and Glaucia
    • VI. The Tribunate of Marcus Livius Drusus, 91 b. c.
    • VII. The Italian or Marsic War, 90–88 b. c.
    • VIII. The First Mithradatic War
    • IX. Sulla’s Dictatorship
    • CHAPTER XIII
    • THE RISE OF POMPEY THE GREAT: 78–60 B. C.
      • I. Pompey’s Command against Sertorius in Spain: 77–71 b. c.
      • II. The Command of Lucullus against Mithradates: 74–66 b. c.
      • III. The Revolt of the Gladiators: 73–71 b. c.
      • IV. The Consulate of Pompey and Crassus: 70 b. c.
      • V. The Commands of Pompey against the Pirates and in the East: 67–62 b. c.
      • VI. The Conspiracy of Catiline, 63 b. c.
      • VII. The Coalition of Pompey, Caesar and Crassus: 60 b. c.
    • I. Pompey’s Command against Sertorius in Spain: 77–71 b. c.
    • II. The Command of Lucullus against Mithradates: 74–66 b. c.
    • III. The Revolt of the Gladiators: 73–71 b. c.
    • IV. The Consulate of Pompey and Crassus: 70 b. c.
    • V. The Commands of Pompey against the Pirates and in the East: 67–62 b. c.
    • VI. The Conspiracy of Catiline, 63 b. c.
    • VII. The Coalition of Pompey, Caesar and Crassus: 60 b. c.
    • CHAPTER XIV
    • THE RIVALRY OF POMPEY AND CAESAR: CAESAR’S DICTATORSHIP; 59–44 B. C.
      • I. Caesar Consul: 59 b. c.
      • II. Caesar’s Conquest of Gaul: 58–51 b. c.
      • III. The Civil War between Caesar and the Senate: 49–46 b. c.
      • IV. The Dictatorship of Julius Caesar: 46–44 b. c.
    • I. Caesar Consul: 59 b. c.
    • II. Caesar’s Conquest of Gaul: 58–51 b. c.
    • III. The Civil War between Caesar and the Senate: 49–46 b. c.
    • IV. The Dictatorship of Julius Caesar: 46–44 b. c.
    • CHAPTER XV
    • THE PASSING OF THE REPUBLIC: 44–27 B. C.
      • I. The Rise of Octavian
      • II. The Triumvirate of 43 b. c.
      • III. The Victory of Octavian over Antony and Cleopatra
      • IV. Society and Intellectual Life in the Last Century of the Republic
    • I. The Rise of Octavian
    • II. The Triumvirate of 43 b. c.
    • III. The Victory of Octavian over Antony and Cleopatra
    • IV. Society and Intellectual Life in the Last Century of the Republic
  • PART III
  • THE PRINCIPATE OR EARLY EMPIRE: 27 B. C.–285 A. D.
    • CHAPTER XVI
    • THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PRINCIPATE: 27 B. C.–14 A. D.
      • I. The Princeps
      • II. The Senate, the Equestrians and the Plebs
      • III. The Military Establishment
      • IV. The Revival of Religion and Morality
      • V. The Provinces and the Frontiers
      • VI. The Administration of Rome
      • VII. The Problem of the Succession
      • VIII. Augustus as a Statesman
    • I. The Princeps
    • II. The Senate, the Equestrians and the Plebs
    • III. The Military Establishment
    • IV. The Revival of Religion and Morality
    • V. The Provinces and the Frontiers
    • VI. The Administration of Rome
    • VII. The Problem of the Succession
    • VIII. Augustus as a Statesman
    • CHAPTER XVII
    • THE JULIO-CLAUDIAN LINE AND THE FLAVIANS: 14–96 A. D.
      • I. Tiberius, 14–37 a. d.
      • II. Caius Caligula, 37–41 a. d.
      • III. Claudius, 41–54 a. d.
      • IV. Nero, 54–68 a. d.
      • V. The First War of the Legions or the Year of the Four Emperors, 68–69 a. d.
      • VI. Vespasian and Titus, 69–81 a. d.
      • VII. Domitian, 81–96 a. d.
    • I. Tiberius, 14–37 a. d.
    • II. Caius Caligula, 37–41 a. d.
    • III. Claudius, 41–54 a. d.
    • IV. Nero, 54–68 a. d.
    • V. The First War of the Legions or the Year of the Four Emperors, 68–69 a. d.
    • VI. Vespasian and Titus, 69–81 a. d.
    • VII. Domitian, 81–96 a. d.
    • CHAPTER XVIII
    • FROM NERVA TO DIOCLETIAN: 96–285 A. D.
      • I. Nerva and Trajan, 96–117 a. d.
      • II. Hadrian, 117–138 a. d.
      • III. The Antonines, 138–192 a. d.
      • IV. The Second War of the Legions, 193–197 a. d.
      • V. The Dynasty of the Severi, 197–235 a. d.
      • VI. The Dissolution and Restoration of the Empire: 235–285 a. d.
    • I. Nerva and Trajan, 96–117 a. d.
    • II. Hadrian, 117–138 a. d.
    • III. The Antonines, 138–192 a. d.
    • IV. The Second War of the Legions, 193–197 a. d.
    • V. The Dynasty of the Severi, 197–235 a. d.
    • VI. The Dissolution and Restoration of the Empire: 235–285 a. d.
    • CHAPTER XIX
    • THE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE PRINCIPATE
      • I. The Victory of Autocracy
      • II. The Growth of the Civil Service
      • III. The Army and the Defence of the Frontiers
      • IV. The Provinces under the Principate
      • V. Municipal Life
      • VI. The Colonate or Serfdom
    • I. The Victory of Autocracy
    • II. The Growth of the Civil Service
    • III. The Army and the Defence of the Frontiers
    • IV. The Provinces under the Principate
    • V. Municipal Life
    • VI. The Colonate or Serfdom
    • CHAPTER XX
    • RELIGION AND SOCIETY
      • I. Society under the Principate
      • II. The Intellectual World
      • III. The Imperial Cult and the Oriental Religions in Roman Paganism
      • IV. Christianity and Its Relation to the Roman State
    • I. Society under the Principate
    • II. The Intellectual World
    • III. The Imperial Cult and the Oriental Religions in Roman Paganism
    • IV. Christianity and Its Relation to the Roman State
  • PART IV
  • THE AUTOCRACY OR LATE EMPIRE: 285–565 A. D.
    • CHAPTER XXI
    • FROM DIOCLETIAN TO THEODOSIUS THE GREAT; THE INTEGRITY OF THE EMPIRE MAINTAINED; 285–395 A. D.
      • I. Diocletian: 285–305 a. d.
      • II. Constantine I, the Great: 306–337 a. d.
      • III. The Dynasty of Constantine: 337–363 a. d.
      • IV. The House of Valentinian and Theodosius the Great: 364–395 a. d.
    • I. Diocletian: 285–305 a. d.
    • II. Constantine I, the Great: 306–337 a. d.
    • III. The Dynasty of Constantine: 337–363 a. d.
    • IV. The House of Valentinian and Theodosius the Great: 364–395 a. d.
    • CHAPTER XXII
    • THE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION OF THE LATE EMPIRE
      • I. The Autocrat and His Court
      • II. The Military Organization
      • III. The Perfection of the Bureaucracy
      • IV. The Nobility and the Senate
      • V. The System of Taxation and the Ruin of the Municipalities
    • I. The Autocrat and His Court
    • II. The Military Organization
    • III. The Perfection of the Bureaucracy
    • IV. The Nobility and the Senate
    • V. The System of Taxation and the Ruin of the Municipalities
    • CHAPTER XXIII
    • THE GERMANIC OCCUPATION OF ITALY AND THE WESTERN PROVINCES: 395–493 A. D.
      • I. General Characteristics of the Period
      • II. The Visigothic Migrations
      • III. The Vandals
      • IV. The Burgundians, Franks, and Saxons
      • V. The Fall of the Western Empire
      • VI. The Survival of the Empire in the East
    • I. General Characteristics of the Period
    • II. The Visigothic Migrations
    • III. The Vandals
    • IV. The Burgundians, Franks, and Saxons
    • V. The Fall of the Western Empire
    • VI. The Survival of the Empire in the East
    • CHAPTER XXIV
    • THE AGE OF JUSTINIAN: 518–565 A. D.
      • I. The Germanic Kingdoms in the West to 533 a. d.
      • II. The Restoration of the Imperial Power in the West: 553–554 a. d.
      • III. Justinian’s Frontier Problems and Internal Administration
    • I. The Germanic Kingdoms in the West to 533 a. d.
    • II. The Restoration of the Imperial Power in the West: 553–554 a. d.
    • III. Justinian’s Frontier Problems and Internal Administration
    • CHAPTER XXV
    • RELIGIOUS AND INTELLECTUAL LIFE IN THE LATE EMPIRE
      • I. The End of Paganism
      • II. The Church in the Christian Empire
      • III. Sectarian Strife
      • IV. Monasticism
      • V. Literature and Art
    • I. The End of Paganism
    • II. The Church in the Christian Empire
    • III. Sectarian Strife
    • IV. Monasticism
    • V. Literature and Art
  • EPILOGUE
  • CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE
  • BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
  • INDEX
  • Footnotes
  • Transcriber’s Note
  • Credits
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