An Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans Called Africans
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An Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans Called Africans

By Lydia Maria Child
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • Transcriber's Note
  • AN APPEAL IN FAVOR OF THAT CLASS OF AMERICANS CALLED AFRICANS.
    • PREFACE.
    • CONTENTS
  • AN APPEAL, &c.
    • CHAPTER I.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • Proposition 1.—Slavery hereditary and perpetual.
      • Prop. 2.—Labor compulsory and uncompensated, &c.
      • Prop. 3.—Slaves considered personal chattels, liable to be sold, pledged, &c.
      • Prop. 4.—Slaves can have no legal claim to any property.
      • Prop. 5.—No colored man can be evidence against a white man, &c.
      • Prop. 6.—The master has absolute power to punish a slave, &c.
      • Prop. 7.—The slave never allowed to resist a white man.
      • Prop. 8.—Slaves cannot redeem themselves or change masters.
      • Prop. 9.—Slave unprotected in his domestic relations.
      • Prop. 10.—The laws obstruct emancipation.
      • Prop. 11.—Operation of the laws interferes with religious privileges.
      • Prop. 12.—Whole power of the laws exerted to keep negroes in ignorance.
      • Prop. 13.—There is a monstrous inequality of law and right.
      • Prop. 14.—The laws operate oppressively on free colored people.
    • Proposition 1.—Slavery hereditary and perpetual.
    • Prop. 2.—Labor compulsory and uncompensated, &c.
    • Prop. 3.—Slaves considered personal chattels, liable to be sold, pledged, &c.
    • Prop. 4.—Slaves can have no legal claim to any property.
    • Prop. 5.—No colored man can be evidence against a white man, &c.
    • Prop. 6.—The master has absolute power to punish a slave, &c.
    • Prop. 7.—The slave never allowed to resist a white man.
    • Prop. 8.—Slaves cannot redeem themselves or change masters.
    • Prop. 9.—Slave unprotected in his domestic relations.
    • Prop. 10.—The laws obstruct emancipation.
    • Prop. 11.—Operation of the laws interferes with religious privileges.
    • Prop. 12.—Whole power of the laws exerted to keep negroes in ignorance.
    • Prop. 13.—There is a monstrous inequality of law and right.
    • Prop. 14.—The laws operate oppressively on free colored people.
    • CHAPTER III.
    • CHAPTER IV.
    • CHAPTER V.
    • CHAPTER VI.
    • CHAPTER VII.
    • CHAPTER VIII.
    • INDEX.
      • Transcriber's Note
    • Transcriber's Note
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