Alchemy: Ancient and Modern Being a Brief Account of the Alchemistic Doctrines, and Their Relations, to Mysticism on the One Hand, and ...
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Alchemy: Ancient and Modern Being a Brief Account of the Alchemistic Doctrines, and Their Relations, to Mysticism on the One Hand, and ...

By H. Stanley (Herbert Stanley) Redgrove
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Book Description
Table of Contents
  • ALCHEMY: ANCIENT AND MODERN
  • PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION
  • PREFACE
  • CONTENTS
  • LIST OF PLATES
  • CHAPTER I THE MEANING OF ALCHEMY
    • The Aim of Alchemy.
    • The Transcendental Theory of Alchemy.
    • Failure of the Transcendental Theory.
    • The Qualifications of the Adept.
    • Alchemistic Language.
    • Alchemists of a Mystical Type.
    • The Meaning of Alchemy.
    • Opinions of other Writers.
    • The Basic Idea of Alchemy.
    • The Law of Analogy.
    • The Dual Nature of Alchemy.
    • “Body, Soul and Spirit.”
    • Alchemy, Mysticism and Modern Science.
  • CHAPTER II THE THEORY OF PHYSICAL ALCHEMY
    • Supposed Proofs of Transmutation.
    • The Alchemistic Elements.
    • Aristotle’s Views regarding the Elements.
    • The Sulphur-Mercury Theory.
    • The Sulphur-Mercury-Salt Theory.
    • Alchemistic Elements and Principles.
    • The Growth of the Metals.
    • Alchemy and Astrology.
    • Alchemistic View of the Nature of Gold.
    • The Philosopher’s Stone.
    • The Nature of the Philosopher’s Stone.
    • The Theory of Development.
    • The Powers of the Philosopher’s Stone.
    • The Elixir of Life.
    • The Practical Methods of the Alchemists.
  • CHAPTER III THE ALCHEMISTS[41] (A. BEFORE PARACELSUS)
    • Hermes Trismegistos.
    • The Smaragdine Table.
    • Zosimus of Panopolis.
    • Geber.
    • Other Arabian Alchemists.
    • Albertus Magnus (1193-1280).
    • Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274).
    • Roger Bacon (1214-1294).
    • Arnold de Villanova (12—?-1310?).
    • Raymond Lully (1235?-1315).
    • Peter Bonus (14th Century).
    • Nicolas Flamel (1330-1418).
    • “Basil Valentine” and “The Triumphal Chariot of Antimony.”
    • Isaac of Holland (15th Century).
    • Bernard Trévisan (1406-1490).
    • Sir George Ripley (14—?-1490?).
    • Thomas Norton (15th Century).
  • CHAPTER IV THE ALCHEMISTS (continued) (B. PARACELSUS AND AFTER)
    • Paracelsus (1493-1541.)
    • Views of Paracelsus.
    • Iatro-Chemistry.
    • The Rosicrucian Society.
    • Thomas Charnock (1524-1581).
    • Andreas Libavius (1540-1616.)
    • Edward Kelley (1555-1595) and John Dee (1527-1608.)
    • Henry Khunrath (1560-1605).
    • Alexander Sethon (?-1604) and Michael Sendivogius (1566?-1646).
    • Michael Maier (1568-1622).
    • Jacob Boehme (1575-1624.)
    • J. B. van Helmont (1577-1644) and F. M. van Helmont (1618-1699.)
    • Johann Rudolf Glauber (1604-1668).
    • Thomas Vaughan (“Eugenius Philalethes”) (1622-1666.)
    • “Eirenæus Philalethes” (1623?-?) and George Starkey (?-1665).
  • CHAPTER V THE OUTCOME OF ALCHEMY
    • Did the Alchemists achieve the “Magnum Opus”?
    • The Testimony of van Helmont.
    • The Testimony of Helvetius.
    • Helvetius obtains the Philosopher’s Stone.
    • Helvetius performs a Transmutation.
    • Helvetius’s Gold Assayed.
    • Helvetius’s Gold Further Tested.
    • The Genesis of Chemistry.
    • The Degeneracy of Alchemy.
    • “Count Cagliostro” (—?-1795).
  • CHAPTER VI THE AGE OF MODERN CHEMISTRY
    • The Birth of Modern Chemistry.
    • The Phlogiston Theory.
    • Boyle and the Definition of an Element.
    • The Stoichiometric Laws.
    • Dalton’s Atomic Theory.
    • The Determination of the Atomic Weights of the Elements.
    • Prout’s Hypothesis.
    • The “Periodic Law.”
    • The Corpuscular Theory of Matter.
    • Proof that the Electrons are not Matter.
    • The Electronic Theory of Matter.
    • The Etheric Theory of Matter.
    • Further Evidence of the Complexity of the Atoms.
    • Views of Wald and Ostwald.
  • CHAPTER VII MODERN ALCHEMY
    • “Modern Alchemy.”
    • X-rays and Becquerel rays.
    • The Discovery of Radium.
    • Chemical Properties of Radium.
    • The Radioactivity of Radium.
    • The Disintegration of the Radium Atom.
    • “Induced Radioactivity.”
    • Properties of Uranium and Thorium.
    • The Radium Emanation.
    • The Production of Helium from Radium.
    • Nature of this Change.
    • Is this Change a true Transmutation?
    • The Production of Neon from Emanation.
    • Ramsay’s Experiments on Copper.
    • Further Experiments on Radium and Copper.
    • Ramsay’s Experiments on Thorium and allied Metals.
    • The Possibility of Making Gold.
    • The Significance of “Allotropy.”
    • Conclusion.
  • Transcriber’s Notes
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