A Practical Enquiry into the Philosophy of Education
Free

A Practical Enquiry into the Philosophy of Education

By James Gall
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • A
    • PRACTICAL ENQUIRY
      • INTO
    • INTO
  • THE PHILOSOPHY
    • OF
  • EDUCATION.
    • INVENTOR OF THE TRIANGULAR ALPHABET FOR THE BLIND; AND AUTHOR OF THE "END AND ESSENCE OF SABBATH SCHOOL TEACHING," &c.
      • EDINBURGH: JAMES GALL & SON, 24, NIDDRY STREET. LONDON: HOULSTON & STONEMAN, 65, PATERNOSTER-ROW. GLASGOW; GEORGE GALLIE. BELFAST: WILLIAM M'COMB. MDCCCXL
    • EDINBURGH: JAMES GALL & SON, 24, NIDDRY STREET. LONDON: HOULSTON & STONEMAN, 65, PATERNOSTER-ROW. GLASGOW; GEORGE GALLIE. BELFAST: WILLIAM M'COMB. MDCCCXL
    • PREFACE.
    • CONTENTS
  • PRACTICAL ENQUIRY, &c.
    • PART I.
    • ON THE PRELIMINARY OBJECTS NECESSARY FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND IMPROVEMENT OF EDUCATION.
      • CHAP. I.
      • On the Importance of establishing the Science of Education on a solid Foundation.
      • CHAP. II.
      • On the Cultivation of Education as a Science.
      • CHAP. III.
      • On the Improvement of Teaching as an Art.
      • CHAP. IV.
      • On the Establishment of Sound Principles in Education.
    • CHAP. I.
    • On the Importance of establishing the Science of Education on a solid Foundation.
    • CHAP. II.
    • On the Cultivation of Education as a Science.
    • CHAP. III.
    • On the Improvement of Teaching as an Art.
    • CHAP. IV.
    • On the Establishment of Sound Principles in Education.
    • PART II.
    • ON THE GREAT DESIGN OF NATURE'S TEACHING, AND THE METHODS SHE EMPLOYS IN CARRYING IT ON.
      • CHAP. I.
      • A Comprehensive View of the several Educational Processes carried on by Nature.
      • CHAP. II.
      • On the Method employed by Nature for cultivating the Powers of the Mind.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. III.
      • On the Means by which Nature enables her Pupils to acquire Knowledge.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. IV.
      • On Nature's Method of communicating Knowledge to the Young by the Principle of Reiteration.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. V.
      • On the Acquisition of Knowledge by the Principle of Individuation.
      • CHAP. VI.
      • On the Application of Knowledge by the Principle of Association, or Grouping.
      • CHAP. VII.
      • On the Acquisition of Knowledge by the Principle of Analysis, or Classification.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. VIII.
      • On Nature's Methods of Teaching her Pupils to make use of their Knowledge.
      • CHAP. IX.
      • On Nature's Methods of Applying Knowledge by the Principle of the Animal, or Common Sense.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. X.
      • On Nature's Method of applying Knowledge by means of the Moral Sense, or Conscience.
      • CHAP. XI.
      • On Nature's Method of Training her Pupils to Communicate their Knowledge.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. XII.
      • Recapitulation of the Philosophical Principles developed in the previous Chapters.
    • CHAP. I.
    • A Comprehensive View of the several Educational Processes carried on by Nature.
    • CHAP. II.
    • On the Method employed by Nature for cultivating the Powers of the Mind.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. III.
    • On the Means by which Nature enables her Pupils to acquire Knowledge.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. IV.
    • On Nature's Method of communicating Knowledge to the Young by the Principle of Reiteration.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. V.
    • On the Acquisition of Knowledge by the Principle of Individuation.
    • CHAP. VI.
    • On the Application of Knowledge by the Principle of Association, or Grouping.
    • CHAP. VII.
    • On the Acquisition of Knowledge by the Principle of Analysis, or Classification.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. VIII.
    • On Nature's Methods of Teaching her Pupils to make use of their Knowledge.
    • CHAP. IX.
    • On Nature's Methods of Applying Knowledge by the Principle of the Animal, or Common Sense.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. X.
    • On Nature's Method of applying Knowledge by means of the Moral Sense, or Conscience.
    • CHAP. XI.
    • On Nature's Method of Training her Pupils to Communicate their Knowledge.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. XII.
    • Recapitulation of the Philosophical Principles developed in the previous Chapters.
    • PART III.
      • ON THE METHODS BY WHICH THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESSES OF NATURE MAY BE SUCCESSFULLY IMITATED.
      • CHAP. I.
      • On the Exercises by which Nature may be imitated in cultivating the Powers of the Mind.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. II.
      • On the Methods by which Nature may be imitated in the Pupil's Acquisition of Knowledge; with a Review of the Analogy between the Mental and Physical Appetites of the Young.
      • CHAP. III.
      • How Nature may be imitated in Communicating Knowledge to the Pupil, by the Reiteration of Ideas.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. IV.
      • On the Means by which Nature may be imitated in Exercising the Principle of Individuation.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. V.
      • On the Means by which Nature may be imitated in Applying the Principle of Grouping, or Association.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. VI.
      • On the Methods by which Nature may be imitated in Communicating Knowledge by Classification, or Analysis.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. VII.
      • On the Imitation of Nature in Teaching the Practical Use of Knowledge.
      • CHAP. VIII.
      • On the Imitation of Nature in Teaching the Use of Knowledge by means of the Animal or Common Sense.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. IX.
      • On the Imitation of Nature in Teaching the Practical Use of Knowledge by means of the Moral Sense, or Conscience.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. X.
      • On the Application of our Knowledge to the Common Affairs of Life.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. XI.
      • On the Imitation of Nature, in training her Pupils fluently to communicate their Knowledge.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • ON THE METHODS BY WHICH THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESSES OF NATURE MAY BE SUCCESSFULLY IMITATED.
    • CHAP. I.
    • On the Exercises by which Nature may be imitated in cultivating the Powers of the Mind.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. II.
    • On the Methods by which Nature may be imitated in the Pupil's Acquisition of Knowledge; with a Review of the Analogy between the Mental and Physical Appetites of the Young.
    • CHAP. III.
    • How Nature may be imitated in Communicating Knowledge to the Pupil, by the Reiteration of Ideas.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. IV.
    • On the Means by which Nature may be imitated in Exercising the Principle of Individuation.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. V.
    • On the Means by which Nature may be imitated in Applying the Principle of Grouping, or Association.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. VI.
    • On the Methods by which Nature may be imitated in Communicating Knowledge by Classification, or Analysis.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. VII.
    • On the Imitation of Nature in Teaching the Practical Use of Knowledge.
    • CHAP. VIII.
    • On the Imitation of Nature in Teaching the Use of Knowledge by means of the Animal or Common Sense.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. IX.
    • On the Imitation of Nature in Teaching the Practical Use of Knowledge by means of the Moral Sense, or Conscience.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. X.
    • On the Application of our Knowledge to the Common Affairs of Life.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. XI.
    • On the Imitation of Nature, in training her Pupils fluently to communicate their Knowledge.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • PART IV.
    • ON THE SELECTION OF PROPER TRUTHS AND SUBJECTS TO BE TAUGHT IN SCHOOLS AND FAMILIES.
      • CHAP. I.
      • On the General Principles which ought to regulate our choice of Truths and Subjects to be taught to the Young.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP. II.
      • On the particular Branches of Education required for Elementary Schools.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • CHAP III.
      • On the Easiest Methods of Introducing these Principles, for the first time, into Schools already established.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
      • THE END.
      • NOTES
      • THE END.
    • CHAP. I.
    • On the General Principles which ought to regulate our choice of Truths and Subjects to be taught to the Young.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP. II.
    • On the particular Branches of Education required for Elementary Schools.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAP III.
    • On the Easiest Methods of Introducing these Principles, for the first time, into Schools already established.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • THE END.
    • NOTES
    • THE END.
    No review for this book yet, be the first to review.
      No comment for this book yet, be the first to comment
      You May Also Like
      Also Available On
      Categories
      Curated Lists