Hodder Education
My Revision Notes: Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History: Crime and punishment in Britain, c1000-present and Whitechapel, c1870-c1900
Alec Fisher
My Revision Notes: Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History: Crime and punishment in Britain, c1000-present and Whitechapel, c1870-c1900
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Description
Contents
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Exam board: Pearson Edexcel
Level: GCSE
Subject: History
First teaching: September 2016
First exams: Summer 2018

Endorsed for Edexcel

Target success in Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History with this proven formula for effective, structured revision.


Key content coverage is combined with exam-style questions, revision tasks and practical tips to create a revision guide that students can rely on to review, strengthen and test their knowledge.

With My Revision Notes every student can:

> Plan and manage a successful revision programme using the topic-by-topic planner

> Enjoy an interactive approach to revision, with clear topic summaries that consolidate knowledge and related activities that put the content into context

> Build, practise and enhance exam skills by progressing through activities set at different levels

> Improve exam technique through exam-style questions and model answers with commentary from expert authors and teachers

> Get exam ready with extra quick quizzes and answers to the activities available online

Language
English
ISBN
9781510402997
Cover
Title Page
Copyright
How to get the most out of this book
Contents and revision planner
Part 1: Crime and punishment in Britain, c.1000–present
An overview of crime and punishment from c.1000
The role of factors
c.1000–c.1500: Crime and punishment in medieval England
1 Anglo-Saxon justice
1.1 Anglo-Saxon law enforcement
1.2 Anglo-Saxon punishments
2 The effect of the Norman Conquest on crime and punishment
2.1 Norman laws
2.2 Norman law enforcement
2.3 Norman punishments
3 Crime and punishment in the later middle ages
3.1 Law enforcement in the later middle ages
3.2 Punishments in the later middle ages
4 Case study: Did the Church help or hinder justice in the early thirteenth century?
4.1 Sanctuary
4.2 Church courts
4.3 Benefit of the clergy
4.4 Trial by ordeal
c.1500–c.1700: Crime and punishment in early modern England
1 Nature and changing definitions of criminal activity (1)
1.1 Heresy and treason
1.2 Case study: The Gunpowder Plot of 1605
2 Nature and changing definitions of criminal activity (2)
2.1 Growing fears of vagabondage
2.2 The reality of vagabondage
3 Case study: Matthew Hopkins and witchcraft
3.1 Reasons for the rise in accusations of witchcraft
3.2 The role of Matthew Hopkins 1645–47
3.3 Trial and punishment for witchcraft
4 The nature of law enforcement and punishment (1)
4.1 Policing
4.2 Trials
5 The nature of law enforcement and punishment (2)
5.1 Reasons why the Bloody Code was introduced
5.2 Other punishments
c.1700–c.1900: Crime and punishment in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain
1 Nature and changing definitions of criminal activity (1)
1.1 Highway robbery
1.2 Smuggling and poaching
2 Nature and changing definitions of criminal activity (2)
2.1 The Tolpuddle Martyrs
3 The nature of law enforcement and punishment (1)
3.1 The Fielding brothers and the Bow Street Runners
3.2 Case study: Robert Peel and the Metropolitan Police Force
3.3 The development of policing after 1829
4 The nature of law enforcement and punishment (2)
4.1 The abolition of the Bloody Code
4.2 Transportation
4.3 Changes to prisons
4.4 Case study: Pentonville and the separate system
c.1900–present: Crime and punishment in modern Britain
1 Nature and changing definitions of criminal activity
1.1 New crimes and old
1.2 Case study: The treatment of conscientious objectors in the First and Second World Wars
2 The nature of law enforcement and punishment (1)
2.1 Increased specialisation in the police force
2.2 The impact of science and technology on policing
2.3 Crime prevention and community relations
3 The nature of law enforcement and punishment (2)
3.1 The abolition of the death penalty
3.2 Case study: Derek Bentley
3.3 Changes to prisons and non-custodial punishments
Part 2: Whitechapel, c.1870–c.1900: crime, policing and the inner city
1 The context of Whitechapel
1.1 Housing in Whitechapel
1.2 Work and workhouses in Whitechapel
2 Tensions in Whitechapel
2.1 Irish immigration
2.2 Eastern European Jewish immigration
2.3 The growth of anarchism and socialism
3 The organisation of policing in Whitechapel
3.1 H Division
3.2 Key features that made policing Whitechapel so difficult
4 The workings of the Metropolitan Police
4.1 Recruitment
4.2 The role of the beat constable
4.3 The role of the Criminal Investigation Department (CID)
4.4 The Home Secretary and Sir Charles Warren
5 Investigative policing in Whitechapel
5.1 The Ripper murders
5.2 Police investigative techniques
5.3 Media reporting
5.4 Cooperation with other police forces
5.5 The Whitechapel Vigilance Committee
Exam focus
Question 1: Key features
Question 2(a): Utility
Question 2(b): Framing a historical enquiry
Question 3: Similarity or difference
Question 4: Causation
Questions 5 and 6: A judgement about change, continuity and significance
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