Society for Pure English, Tract 02 On English Homophones
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Society for Pure English, Tract 02 On English Homophones

By Robert Bridges
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Book Description
Table of Contents
  • S.P.E.
  • Tract No. II
    • ON
  • ENGLISH HOMOPHONES
    • BY
  • Robert Bridges
    • ENGLISH HOMOPHONES
    • LIST OF HOMOPHONES
      • I. THE MAIN LIST OF HOMOPHONES.
        • II. All the following examples involve wh. > w.5
        • III. Group of Homophones caused by loss of trilled R.6
        • IV. The name of a species (of animals, plants, &c.) is often a homophone. Where there is only one alternative meaning, this causes so little inconvenience that the following names (being in that condition) have been excluded from List I.7
        • V. The suffix er added to a root often makes homophones. The following are examples. (And see in List VI.)
        • VI. Words excluded from the main list for various reasons, their homophony being rightly questioned by many speakers.
        • VII. Homophones due only to an inflected form of a word. Comparatives of adjectives, &c.
        • VIII. 'False homophones' [see p. 4], doubtful doublets, &c.
        • IX. The following words were not admitted into the main class chiefly on account of their unimportance.
        • 1. That homophones are a nuisance.
        • 2. That English is exceptionally burdened with homophones.
        • 4. That the loss due to homophony threatens to impoverish the language.
        • 5. That the South English dialect is a direct and chief cause of homophones.
        • 6. That the mischief is being propagated by phoneticians.
        • 7. On the claim that Southern English has to represent all British speech.
      • II. All the following examples involve wh. > w.5
      • III. Group of Homophones caused by loss of trilled R.6
      • IV. The name of a species (of animals, plants, &c.) is often a homophone. Where there is only one alternative meaning, this causes so little inconvenience that the following names (being in that condition) have been excluded from List I.7
      • V. The suffix er added to a root often makes homophones. The following are examples. (And see in List VI.)
      • VI. Words excluded from the main list for various reasons, their homophony being rightly questioned by many speakers.
      • VII. Homophones due only to an inflected form of a word. Comparatives of adjectives, &c.
      • VIII. 'False homophones' [see p. 4], doubtful doublets, &c.
      • IX. The following words were not admitted into the main class chiefly on account of their unimportance.
      • 1. That homophones are a nuisance.
      • 2. That English is exceptionally burdened with homophones.
      • 4. That the loss due to homophony threatens to impoverish the language.
      • 5. That the South English dialect is a direct and chief cause of homophones.
      • 6. That the mischief is being propagated by phoneticians.
      • 7. On the claim that Southern English has to represent all British speech.
    • I. THE MAIN LIST OF HOMOPHONES.
      • II. All the following examples involve wh. > w.5
      • III. Group of Homophones caused by loss of trilled R.6
      • IV. The name of a species (of animals, plants, &c.) is often a homophone. Where there is only one alternative meaning, this causes so little inconvenience that the following names (being in that condition) have been excluded from List I.7
      • V. The suffix er added to a root often makes homophones. The following are examples. (And see in List VI.)
      • VI. Words excluded from the main list for various reasons, their homophony being rightly questioned by many speakers.
      • VII. Homophones due only to an inflected form of a word. Comparatives of adjectives, &c.
      • VIII. 'False homophones' [see p. 4], doubtful doublets, &c.
      • IX. The following words were not admitted into the main class chiefly on account of their unimportance.
      • 1. That homophones are a nuisance.
      • 2. That English is exceptionally burdened with homophones.
      • 4. That the loss due to homophony threatens to impoverish the language.
      • 5. That the South English dialect is a direct and chief cause of homophones.
      • 6. That the mischief is being propagated by phoneticians.
      • 7. On the claim that Southern English has to represent all British speech.
    • II. All the following examples involve wh. > w.5
    • III. Group of Homophones caused by loss of trilled R.6
    • IV. The name of a species (of animals, plants, &c.) is often a homophone. Where there is only one alternative meaning, this causes so little inconvenience that the following names (being in that condition) have been excluded from List I.7
    • V. The suffix er added to a root often makes homophones. The following are examples. (And see in List VI.)
    • VI. Words excluded from the main list for various reasons, their homophony being rightly questioned by many speakers.
    • VII. Homophones due only to an inflected form of a word. Comparatives of adjectives, &c.
    • VIII. 'False homophones' [see p. 4], doubtful doublets, &c.
    • IX. The following words were not admitted into the main class chiefly on account of their unimportance.
    • 1. That homophones are a nuisance.
    • 2. That English is exceptionally burdened with homophones.
    • 4. That the loss due to homophony threatens to impoverish the language.
    • 5. That the South English dialect is a direct and chief cause of homophones.
    • 6. That the mischief is being propagated by phoneticians.
    • 7. On the claim that Southern English has to represent all British speech.
    • SUMMARY
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