Great African Travellers From Mungo Park to Livingstone and Stanley
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Great African Travellers From Mungo Park to Livingstone and Stanley

By William Henry Giles Kingston
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Table of Contents
  • W.H.G. Kingston
  • "Great African Travellers"
    • From Mungo Park To Livingstone And Stanley.
    • Chapter One.
      • Introductory.
      • Introduction—The African Association—Ledyard—Lucas—First information respecting the Niger, or Quorra, and the Gambia—Timbuctoo heard of—Thompson and Jobson’s voyage up the Gambia—Major Haughton’s expedition and death.
    • Introductory.
    • Introduction—The African Association—Ledyard—Lucas—First information respecting the Niger, or Quorra, and the Gambia—Timbuctoo heard of—Thompson and Jobson’s voyage up the Gambia—Major Haughton’s expedition and death.
    • Chapter Two.
      • Travels of Mungo Park.
      • Parentage—Returns from India—Sent out by the African Association—Sails for Africa—Arrives at Pisania—Starts with a come eastward—Mumbo Jumbo—Arrives at Koojar—Reaches capital of Bondou—Welcomed at the capital of Kaarta by King Daisy—Seized at the town of Dalli by Moorish soldiers, and carried captive to Benowm—Barbarously treated by Ali—Taken to visit Ali’s wife Fatima—She compassionates him—Almost starved—Difficulty of obtaining water—His servants taken from him—Ali attacked by Daisy—Park again falls into Ali’s hands—Resolves to escape.
    • Travels of Mungo Park.
    • Parentage—Returns from India—Sent out by the African Association—Sails for Africa—Arrives at Pisania—Starts with a come eastward—Mumbo Jumbo—Arrives at Koojar—Reaches capital of Bondou—Welcomed at the capital of Kaarta by King Daisy—Seized at the town of Dalli by Moorish soldiers, and carried captive to Benowm—Barbarously treated by Ali—Taken to visit Ali’s wife Fatima—She compassionates him—Almost starved—Difficulty of obtaining water—His servants taken from him—Ali attacked by Daisy—Park again falls into Ali’s hands—Resolves to escape.
    • Chapter Three.
      • Mungo Park’s travels continued.
      • Park escapes at night—Pursued by Moors and robbed—Fearful suffering; from thirst—Finds water—Kindly treated by an old woman—Wanderings in the forest—Reaches Bambarra—Ill-treated—Reaches the Niger—Arrives at Sego, the capital—The king refuses to see him—Sent to a distant village—Almost starving—A compassionate woman takes him into her house and feeds him—King Mansong orders him to quit the country—Enters Sansanding on the Niger—The Moors threaten him for being a Christian—Writes charms for his host—Proceeds—Followed by a lion—His horse falls sick, and, leaving the animal, he proceeds on foot—Proceeds down the Niger to Moorzan—Determines to return—Finds his horse alive—Rainy season commences—Again reaches Sansanding—Inhospitably treated—Repulsed from numerous places—Swims several rivers—Better treated as he gets westward—A negro merchant at Rammako receives him hospitably—Sets off with a singing man as his guide—Conducted by two shepherds—Despoiled of his clothes and horse by robbers—In danger of perishing—Reaches Sibidooloo—Mansa, the chief man, recovers his horse and clothes—Suffers from fever—People starving—Continues his journey—Kindly treated at Kamatia by a Bushreen—Kafa Taura—Starts with a slave caravan—Attacked by bees—Death of a slave—Sufferings of slaves—Reaches Pisania—Sails by way of America for England—Reaches home.
    • Mungo Park’s travels continued.
    • Park escapes at night—Pursued by Moors and robbed—Fearful suffering; from thirst—Finds water—Kindly treated by an old woman—Wanderings in the forest—Reaches Bambarra—Ill-treated—Reaches the Niger—Arrives at Sego, the capital—The king refuses to see him—Sent to a distant village—Almost starving—A compassionate woman takes him into her house and feeds him—King Mansong orders him to quit the country—Enters Sansanding on the Niger—The Moors threaten him for being a Christian—Writes charms for his host—Proceeds—Followed by a lion—His horse falls sick, and, leaving the animal, he proceeds on foot—Proceeds down the Niger to Moorzan—Determines to return—Finds his horse alive—Rainy season commences—Again reaches Sansanding—Inhospitably treated—Repulsed from numerous places—Swims several rivers—Better treated as he gets westward—A negro merchant at Rammako receives him hospitably—Sets off with a singing man as his guide—Conducted by two shepherds—Despoiled of his clothes and horse by robbers—In danger of perishing—Reaches Sibidooloo—Mansa, the chief man, recovers his horse and clothes—Suffers from fever—People starving—Continues his journey—Kindly treated at Kamatia by a Bushreen—Kafa Taura—Starts with a slave caravan—Attacked by bees—Death of a slave—Sufferings of slaves—Reaches Pisania—Sails by way of America for England—Reaches home.
    • Chapter Four.
      • Park’s second journey.
      • Marries—Prepares for another journey—Accompanied by Messrs Anderson and Scott, Lieutenant Martyn and thirty-five soldiers, proceeds to Pisania by way of Goree—Engages Isaaco as guide—Numerous asses—Journey commenced—Three soldiers die—Attacked by bees—Sickness among the men increases—Annoyed by lions—Messrs Anderson and Scott ill of fever—Several men left behind—Isaaco seized by a crocodile—Natives attempt to rob them—A bridge built—Reach Bangassi—Scott left behind, sick—The corporal and more men die—Mr Anderson’s illness increases—Followed by lions—Heavy rains—Meets Kafa Taura—The Niger reached—Descends the Niger in a canoe—Isaaco takes his leave—Alarming reports—Receives envoys from Mansong—Continues voyage in canoes—Receives news of Scott’s death—Mr Anderson dies—A vessel built—Commences voyage in her with Lieutenant Martyn, two white men and some slaves—Attacked by natives—Continues voyage—Again attacked—Park and Marlyn drowned, others killed—One slave escapes, who gives an account of the tragedy.
    • Park’s second journey.
    • Marries—Prepares for another journey—Accompanied by Messrs Anderson and Scott, Lieutenant Martyn and thirty-five soldiers, proceeds to Pisania by way of Goree—Engages Isaaco as guide—Numerous asses—Journey commenced—Three soldiers die—Attacked by bees—Sickness among the men increases—Annoyed by lions—Messrs Anderson and Scott ill of fever—Several men left behind—Isaaco seized by a crocodile—Natives attempt to rob them—A bridge built—Reach Bangassi—Scott left behind, sick—The corporal and more men die—Mr Anderson’s illness increases—Followed by lions—Heavy rains—Meets Kafa Taura—The Niger reached—Descends the Niger in a canoe—Isaaco takes his leave—Alarming reports—Receives envoys from Mansong—Continues voyage in canoes—Receives news of Scott’s death—Mr Anderson dies—A vessel built—Commences voyage in her with Lieutenant Martyn, two white men and some slaves—Attacked by natives—Continues voyage—Again attacked—Park and Marlyn drowned, others killed—One slave escapes, who gives an account of the tragedy.
    • Chapter Five.
      • Travels of Denham and Clapperton.
      • Preceded by Horneman—Roentgen—Tuckey and others—Major Laing’s journey—Lieutenant Clapperton and Dr Oudney, joined by Major Denham, leave Tripoli—Difficulties with the Pacha—Denham sails for England—The Pacha sends after him—Boo-Khaloum appointed conductor—Journey across the Desert—Illness of Clapperton and Oudney—Numberless skeletons of slaves—Arabs’ ill-treatment of the natives—Lake Chad—Empire of Bornou—Reception at Kouka by the Sheikh—Body-guard of the Sheikh—Barca Gana, his General—Visit to the Sultan of Birnie—Elephant and Buffalo hunting—Denham joins an expedition under Baca Gana—Meet the Sultan of Mandara—Attack on the Felatahs—Denham nearly loses his life—Boo-Khaloum killed—Barca Gana’s troops take to flight—The Major kindly treated by a deposed Prince—Returns to Kouka.
    • Travels of Denham and Clapperton.
    • Preceded by Horneman—Roentgen—Tuckey and others—Major Laing’s journey—Lieutenant Clapperton and Dr Oudney, joined by Major Denham, leave Tripoli—Difficulties with the Pacha—Denham sails for England—The Pacha sends after him—Boo-Khaloum appointed conductor—Journey across the Desert—Illness of Clapperton and Oudney—Numberless skeletons of slaves—Arabs’ ill-treatment of the natives—Lake Chad—Empire of Bornou—Reception at Kouka by the Sheikh—Body-guard of the Sheikh—Barca Gana, his General—Visit to the Sultan of Birnie—Elephant and Buffalo hunting—Denham joins an expedition under Baca Gana—Meet the Sultan of Mandara—Attack on the Felatahs—Denham nearly loses his life—Boo-Khaloum killed—Barca Gana’s troops take to flight—The Major kindly treated by a deposed Prince—Returns to Kouka.
    • Chapter Six.
      • Travels of Denham and Clapperton, continued.
      • Major Denham and Dr Oudney visit old Birnie—Accompany the Sheikh on an expedition against the Munga—Review of troops—Submission of rebels—Barca Gana disgraced—Return—Arrival of Lieutenant Toole—Expedition to the Shary—Pest of flies—Well received by the Sultan of Begharrni—Death of Lieutenant Toole—Returns to Kouka—Arrival of Mr Tyrhwit—Expedition against rebels on shores of Lake Chad—Barca Gana again defeated and wounded—The Sheikh’s severe laws against immorality.
    • Travels of Denham and Clapperton, continued.
    • Major Denham and Dr Oudney visit old Birnie—Accompany the Sheikh on an expedition against the Munga—Review of troops—Submission of rebels—Barca Gana disgraced—Return—Arrival of Lieutenant Toole—Expedition to the Shary—Pest of flies—Well received by the Sultan of Begharrni—Death of Lieutenant Toole—Returns to Kouka—Arrival of Mr Tyrhwit—Expedition against rebels on shores of Lake Chad—Barca Gana again defeated and wounded—The Sheikh’s severe laws against immorality.
    • Chapter Seven.
      • Clapperton’s journey to Soudan.
      • Expedition of Clapperton and Oudney to Soudan—Beauty of the women—Cruelty of the Arabs—Dr Oudney prescribes for the sick—Reach Katagum—Slaves offered as presents—Death of Dr Oudney—Clapperton arrives at Kano—City described—Haussa boxers—Sackatoo reached—Reception by Sultan Bello—Great intelligence of the Sultan—Wonder at English customs—Desires that a consul and doctor may be sent to him—Clapperton leaves Sackatoo—Sufferings from thirst—Dangerous journey—Returns to Kouka—Visit to Lake Chad—Journey across the Desert to Tripoli.
    • Clapperton’s journey to Soudan.
    • Expedition of Clapperton and Oudney to Soudan—Beauty of the women—Cruelty of the Arabs—Dr Oudney prescribes for the sick—Reach Katagum—Slaves offered as presents—Death of Dr Oudney—Clapperton arrives at Kano—City described—Haussa boxers—Sackatoo reached—Reception by Sultan Bello—Great intelligence of the Sultan—Wonder at English customs—Desires that a consul and doctor may be sent to him—Clapperton leaves Sackatoo—Sufferings from thirst—Dangerous journey—Returns to Kouka—Visit to Lake Chad—Journey across the Desert to Tripoli.
    • Chapter Eight.
      • Captain Clapperton’s second journey.
      • Captain Clapperton’s second journey, accompanied by Richard Lander—Joined by Captain Pearce—Messrs Morrison and Dickson—Reaches Benin—Journey of Dickson and Columbus—Their disappearance—Clapperton starts from Badagarry—Joined by Mr Houtson—Expedition reaches Jannah—Attacked by fever—Well received—Fondness of people for dogs—Death of Captain Pearce and Dr Morrison—The King of Eyeo and his wives—Beautiful country—Felatah villages—Enter Youriba—The King’s Court—Entertained with a play—Mr Houtson returns and dies—Clapperton, with Lander and Pasco, proceeds alone—Reaches Wawa, near the Niger—The widow Zuma—Inquiries about Park—Visits the scene of his death—Well treated by King of Wawa—Enters kingdom of Nyffe—Lax Mahommedans—Desolated by warfare—Reaches Kano—Leaves Lander with the baggage, and proceeds to Sackatoo alone—Trying journey—Well received by Bello—Siege of Zeg-zeg—Absurd style of fighting—Bello seizes his property—Lander arrives at Sackatoo—Illness and death of Clapperton—Buried by Lander—Lander sets out with intention of exploring the Niger—Warned not to proceed south—Leaves Kano for the west—Taken to Zaria—Allowed to proceed—Continues journey alone to Badagarry, and arrives in England.
    • Captain Clapperton’s second journey.
    • Captain Clapperton’s second journey, accompanied by Richard Lander—Joined by Captain Pearce—Messrs Morrison and Dickson—Reaches Benin—Journey of Dickson and Columbus—Their disappearance—Clapperton starts from Badagarry—Joined by Mr Houtson—Expedition reaches Jannah—Attacked by fever—Well received—Fondness of people for dogs—Death of Captain Pearce and Dr Morrison—The King of Eyeo and his wives—Beautiful country—Felatah villages—Enter Youriba—The King’s Court—Entertained with a play—Mr Houtson returns and dies—Clapperton, with Lander and Pasco, proceeds alone—Reaches Wawa, near the Niger—The widow Zuma—Inquiries about Park—Visits the scene of his death—Well treated by King of Wawa—Enters kingdom of Nyffe—Lax Mahommedans—Desolated by warfare—Reaches Kano—Leaves Lander with the baggage, and proceeds to Sackatoo alone—Trying journey—Well received by Bello—Siege of Zeg-zeg—Absurd style of fighting—Bello seizes his property—Lander arrives at Sackatoo—Illness and death of Clapperton—Buried by Lander—Lander sets out with intention of exploring the Niger—Warned not to proceed south—Leaves Kano for the west—Taken to Zaria—Allowed to proceed—Continues journey alone to Badagarry, and arrives in England.
    • Chapter Nine.
      • Journey of the Landers, and their voyage down the Niger, 1830.
      • The brothers reach Badagarry—Proceed inland to Katunga—Well received by the King—Reach Boussa—The widow Zurna—Kind-hearted King—Visit Youri—Reception by the King—Obtain relics of Park—The dancing monarch—Obtain canoes—Begin voyage down the Niger—Great width of the river at Leechee—Sleet the King of the Dark Water—A roguish Arab—Detained by Mallam Dendow—Compelled to give him Park’s robe—Reach Egga—No presents remaining—Pass mouth of Binue—Threatened by Natives—Detained at Damuggoo—Attacked by piratical canoes—John Lander nearly drowned—Property seized—Rescued by an honest chief—Inhabitants side with them—Journals lost—Continue voyage—Reach Eboe—Interview with Obie, the King—Hear of English and Spanish ships in the river—Conveyed down the river by King Boy—Reach English brig—Brutal conduct of the captain—Brig escapes from the river—The Landers sail for Rio de Janeiro and reach England.
    • Journey of the Landers, and their voyage down the Niger, 1830.
    • The brothers reach Badagarry—Proceed inland to Katunga—Well received by the King—Reach Boussa—The widow Zurna—Kind-hearted King—Visit Youri—Reception by the King—Obtain relics of Park—The dancing monarch—Obtain canoes—Begin voyage down the Niger—Great width of the river at Leechee—Sleet the King of the Dark Water—A roguish Arab—Detained by Mallam Dendow—Compelled to give him Park’s robe—Reach Egga—No presents remaining—Pass mouth of Binue—Threatened by Natives—Detained at Damuggoo—Attacked by piratical canoes—John Lander nearly drowned—Property seized—Rescued by an honest chief—Inhabitants side with them—Journals lost—Continue voyage—Reach Eboe—Interview with Obie, the King—Hear of English and Spanish ships in the river—Conveyed down the river by King Boy—Reach English brig—Brutal conduct of the captain—Brig escapes from the river—The Landers sail for Rio de Janeiro and reach England.
    • Chapter Ten.
      • Travels and adventures of Dr Barth in North and Central Africa, 1849.
      • Leaves Tripoli with Mr Richardson and Dr Overweg—Suppression of slave trade the chief object of the expedition—Numerous ruins seen—Cross the Hammada desert—Rest at an oasis—Reach Mourzouk—Dr Barth’s adventure—Nearly perishes in the desert—Difficulties of journey—Followed by Tawarek freebooters—Preparations for an attack—Strange dancers—Tribute demanded—Camp at night—Expecting an attack—Constant firing kept up—Camels stolen—Pursued—Dangerous situation—Travellers expect death—Saved by friendly Chief—Dr Barth visits Agades—A salt-caravan—The caravan reaches Tagelel.
    • Travels and adventures of Dr Barth in North and Central Africa, 1849.
    • Leaves Tripoli with Mr Richardson and Dr Overweg—Suppression of slave trade the chief object of the expedition—Numerous ruins seen—Cross the Hammada desert—Rest at an oasis—Reach Mourzouk—Dr Barth’s adventure—Nearly perishes in the desert—Difficulties of journey—Followed by Tawarek freebooters—Preparations for an attack—Strange dancers—Tribute demanded—Camp at night—Expecting an attack—Constant firing kept up—Camels stolen—Pursued—Dangerous situation—Travellers expect death—Saved by friendly Chief—Dr Barth visits Agades—A salt-caravan—The caravan reaches Tagelel.
    • Chapter Eleven.
      • Travels of Dr Barth, continued.
      • Dr Barth quits Mr Richardson—Reaches Tassawa—Arrives at Kano—Flourishing country—Kano described—Kindly treated—Manufactures and imports—Sets out with his servant Gatroni for Bornou—Hears of Mr Richardson’s death—Enters Kouka—The Vizier meets him—Reception of the Sheikh, a black—Excursion with the Sheikh to Ngornu—Visits Lake Chad—Fishermen on the lake—Journey to Adamawa—Reaches the Binue river—Compelled to return—Sets out for Kanem—Travelling with robber party—Attacked by natives—Robbers beaten—Returns to Kouka—Expedition of Vizier against Mandara—Beautiful, well-cultivated country devoted to destruction—The natives barbarously slaughtered—Slaves taken—Demmo destroyed—Musgu warriors—Natives defend themselves on an island—Returns to Kouka—Journey to Begharmi—Well treated at Loggun—Reaches the magnificent Shary—White ants—Made prisoner and put into chains—Released, and enters Mas-ena—A learned black Faki—Visit to the Sultan—His superstitious fears—Barth returns to Kouka—Death of Dr Overweg.
    • Travels of Dr Barth, continued.
    • Dr Barth quits Mr Richardson—Reaches Tassawa—Arrives at Kano—Flourishing country—Kano described—Kindly treated—Manufactures and imports—Sets out with his servant Gatroni for Bornou—Hears of Mr Richardson’s death—Enters Kouka—The Vizier meets him—Reception of the Sheikh, a black—Excursion with the Sheikh to Ngornu—Visits Lake Chad—Fishermen on the lake—Journey to Adamawa—Reaches the Binue river—Compelled to return—Sets out for Kanem—Travelling with robber party—Attacked by natives—Robbers beaten—Returns to Kouka—Expedition of Vizier against Mandara—Beautiful, well-cultivated country devoted to destruction—The natives barbarously slaughtered—Slaves taken—Demmo destroyed—Musgu warriors—Natives defend themselves on an island—Returns to Kouka—Journey to Begharmi—Well treated at Loggun—Reaches the magnificent Shary—White ants—Made prisoner and put into chains—Released, and enters Mas-ena—A learned black Faki—Visit to the Sultan—His superstitious fears—Barth returns to Kouka—Death of Dr Overweg.
    • Chapter Twelve.
      • Travels of Dr Barth concluded.
      • Barth sets out for Timbuctoo—Detained at Katseena—Reaches Say, on the Niger—Crosses River—Meets an Arab, who offers to escort him—Disguised as an Arab—Enters Bambarra—Swampy country—Embarks on the Niger—Voyage up the river to Kabara—Rice to Timbuctoo—Enters the city—The Sheikh El Bakay—Compelled to remain in his house—Timbuctoo described—The fanatics threaten his life—Accompanies the Sheikh into the desert—Returns to the city—Hears about Mungo Park—The river rises—For fear of disturbances from the fanatics, goes into the desert again—Sets out with the Sheikh towards Kouka—Lions and hippopotami—Reaches Sackatoo—Hears of expedition under Dr Vogel—Dangers of journey—Reaches Bundi—Meets Dr Vogel—Repast, but no wine—Well received by Sheikh Omar at Kouka—Detained four months—Returns with a caravan to Tripoli—Discovery of Binue river most important result of journey.
    • Travels of Dr Barth concluded.
    • Barth sets out for Timbuctoo—Detained at Katseena—Reaches Say, on the Niger—Crosses River—Meets an Arab, who offers to escort him—Disguised as an Arab—Enters Bambarra—Swampy country—Embarks on the Niger—Voyage up the river to Kabara—Rice to Timbuctoo—Enters the city—The Sheikh El Bakay—Compelled to remain in his house—Timbuctoo described—The fanatics threaten his life—Accompanies the Sheikh into the desert—Returns to the city—Hears about Mungo Park—The river rises—For fear of disturbances from the fanatics, goes into the desert again—Sets out with the Sheikh towards Kouka—Lions and hippopotami—Reaches Sackatoo—Hears of expedition under Dr Vogel—Dangers of journey—Reaches Bundi—Meets Dr Vogel—Repast, but no wine—Well received by Sheikh Omar at Kouka—Detained four months—Returns with a caravan to Tripoli—Discovery of Binue river most important result of journey.
    • Chapter Thirteen.
      • Captain Speke’s discoveries of the Source of the Nile.
      • Speke’s previous career—Joins an expedition to the Somali country—The Somali—Arrive at Berbera—Attacked by robbers—His escape and return to Aden, and finally to England—Joins Captain Burton in an expedition to the Mountains of the Moon—Sets out for Bombay, and afterwards to Zanzibar—Engage Sheikh Said and their escort—Cross to Kaole—Arrive at Caze, and received by the Arab merchants—Porters desert—Illness of Captain Burton, and carried to Zimbili—Sets out with fresh porters—A sight of the Tanganyika Lake—The Mountains of the Moon—Nearly blind—Up the lake to Ujiji—Arrive at Kawele—Their journey on the lake continued—An alarm—Camp at night—Shells—A storm—Arrive at Sultan Casanga’s territory—The people—Arrive at the fish market of Kabizia—A singa—Cross to Kasenge—Reception—The Chief described—The results of slavery—Hears of a large river—Cannot obtain a boat—Returns to Ujiji—Sets out to explore a river that falls into the lake—Tricks of the paddlers—Returns to Ujiji—Help arrives—Returns to Cazé—Sets out to explore the country in the neighbourhood of the Nyanza Lake—Tricks of his escort—Villages described—Detained by a Sultana—The reception she gives Speke—Illness in the caravan—Inon—Leaving Isamiro, the Nyanza appears in sight—The scene—He called the lake Victoria Nyanza—Descends to Muanza—The source of the Nile!—Return journey, and arrives at Caze—Arrives with Captain Burton in England.
    • Captain Speke’s discoveries of the Source of the Nile.
    • Speke’s previous career—Joins an expedition to the Somali country—The Somali—Arrive at Berbera—Attacked by robbers—His escape and return to Aden, and finally to England—Joins Captain Burton in an expedition to the Mountains of the Moon—Sets out for Bombay, and afterwards to Zanzibar—Engage Sheikh Said and their escort—Cross to Kaole—Arrive at Caze, and received by the Arab merchants—Porters desert—Illness of Captain Burton, and carried to Zimbili—Sets out with fresh porters—A sight of the Tanganyika Lake—The Mountains of the Moon—Nearly blind—Up the lake to Ujiji—Arrive at Kawele—Their journey on the lake continued—An alarm—Camp at night—Shells—A storm—Arrive at Sultan Casanga’s territory—The people—Arrive at the fish market of Kabizia—A singa—Cross to Kasenge—Reception—The Chief described—The results of slavery—Hears of a large river—Cannot obtain a boat—Returns to Ujiji—Sets out to explore a river that falls into the lake—Tricks of the paddlers—Returns to Ujiji—Help arrives—Returns to Cazé—Sets out to explore the country in the neighbourhood of the Nyanza Lake—Tricks of his escort—Villages described—Detained by a Sultana—The reception she gives Speke—Illness in the caravan—Inon—Leaving Isamiro, the Nyanza appears in sight—The scene—He called the lake Victoria Nyanza—Descends to Muanza—The source of the Nile!—Return journey, and arrives at Caze—Arrives with Captain Burton in England.
    • Chapter Fourteen.
      • Captains Speke and Grant’s travels from the Island of Zanzibar, on the East Coast of Africa, to Lake Victoria Nyanza, and down the Nile.
      • Sets out with an expedition to prove that the source of the Nile is the Nyanza River—Arrives at Zanzibar—Crosses to Bagomoyo with his followers—The caravan—Squabbles among the porters—The march begun for Caze—The traveller’s routine of work—Tribute demanded by Chiefs—The Hottentot escort and the Waguana escort—The country of the Wazaramo—Their manners and customs—Kidunda—Along the Kinganni River to the country of the Usagara—Grant is ill—Ugogo—The place and people—Encamp on a clearing called Kanyenye, where some of the porters abscond—Shooting rhinoceros—New Year’s Day at Round Rock—Unyamuezi, the Country of the Moon—Caze—Received by his friend Musa—The Unyamuezi people—Set out and reach Mininga—Liberates a slave—Illness, and returns to Caze—The custom of the Weezee—Reaches Mininga again—Difficulties—Arrives at the district of the Chief, Myonga—The Pig—Difficulties again—Speke’s illness—Is attended by Lumeresi, who afterwards makes extortionate demands and causes trouble—Alarming news of Grant.
    • Captains Speke and Grant’s travels from the Island of Zanzibar, on the East Coast of Africa, to Lake Victoria Nyanza, and down the Nile.
    • Sets out with an expedition to prove that the source of the Nile is the Nyanza River—Arrives at Zanzibar—Crosses to Bagomoyo with his followers—The caravan—Squabbles among the porters—The march begun for Caze—The traveller’s routine of work—Tribute demanded by Chiefs—The Hottentot escort and the Waguana escort—The country of the Wazaramo—Their manners and customs—Kidunda—Along the Kinganni River to the country of the Usagara—Grant is ill—Ugogo—The place and people—Encamp on a clearing called Kanyenye, where some of the porters abscond—Shooting rhinoceros—New Year’s Day at Round Rock—Unyamuezi, the Country of the Moon—Caze—Received by his friend Musa—The Unyamuezi people—Set out and reach Mininga—Liberates a slave—Illness, and returns to Caze—The custom of the Weezee—Reaches Mininga again—Difficulties—Arrives at the district of the Chief, Myonga—The Pig—Difficulties again—Speke’s illness—Is attended by Lumeresi, who afterwards makes extortionate demands and causes trouble—Alarming news of Grant.
    • Chapter Fifteen.
      • Speke and Grant’s travels continued.
      • Captain Grant—His description of a Weezee village and the customs of the people—Slavery—Sets out, and is attacked by Myonga—Grant and Speke unite—Journey to Karague—The country described—Rumanika receives them—The people and their customs—Wild animals—Speke sets out for Uganda.
    • Speke and Grant’s travels continued.
    • Captain Grant—His description of a Weezee village and the customs of the people—Slavery—Sets out, and is attacked by Myonga—Grant and Speke unite—Journey to Karague—The country described—Rumanika receives them—The people and their customs—Wild animals—Speke sets out for Uganda.
    • Chapter Sixteen.
      • Speke and Grant’s travels continued.
      • An escort from Mtesa, King of Uganda, arrives—The Kitangule River—The Phépo—Slaughter of the natives—Uganda described—Speke’s reception—Mtesa’s cruelty—Arrest of the Queen—A review of troops—Grant arrives—Arrangements for proceeding to Unyoro—The water-spirit’s high priest.
    • Speke and Grant’s travels continued.
    • An escort from Mtesa, King of Uganda, arrives—The Kitangule River—The Phépo—Slaughter of the natives—Uganda described—Speke’s reception—Mtesa’s cruelty—Arrest of the Queen—A review of troops—Grant arrives—Arrangements for proceeding to Unyoro—The water-spirit’s high priest.
    • Chapter Seventeen.
      • Speke and Grant’s travels concluded.
      • Set out for Kamrasi—Attacked by the Waganda—Reach the Nile—The Isamba Rapids—The Rippon Falls—The source of the Nile—Returns to Urondogani—Threatened destruction—March for Unyoro—Kamrasi’s reception—The magician at work—Kamrasi receives a Bible—Leave Kamrasi, and proceed down the Kuffo to the Falls of Karuma—The Gani people—The Madi—Arrive at Petherick’s outposts—Speke again sets out—The Bari country—Gondokoro and Nile boats seen—Sir Samuel Baker—Voyage down the Nile to Khartoum—A banquet—Berber—Arrive at length in England.
    • Speke and Grant’s travels concluded.
    • Set out for Kamrasi—Attacked by the Waganda—Reach the Nile—The Isamba Rapids—The Rippon Falls—The source of the Nile—Returns to Urondogani—Threatened destruction—March for Unyoro—Kamrasi’s reception—The magician at work—Kamrasi receives a Bible—Leave Kamrasi, and proceed down the Kuffo to the Falls of Karuma—The Gani people—The Madi—Arrive at Petherick’s outposts—Speke again sets out—The Bari country—Gondokoro and Nile boats seen—Sir Samuel Baker—Voyage down the Nile to Khartoum—A banquet—Berber—Arrive at length in England.
    • Chapter Eighteen.
      • Travels of Dr Livingstone—first expedition.
      • His parentage and early life—Sets out for Africa as a missionary from the London Missionary Society—Arrives at Cape Town—Lepelole—Mabotsa—Sechele—Dr Livingstone finds him at Kolobeng—A missionary’s necessary accomplishments—The Kalahara Desert described—Starting—The banks of the Zouga—Lake Ngami—Return to Kolobeng—Return to Lake Ngami—Fever—Set out again and reach the Chobe—Sebituane—Banks of the Zambesi—Returns to Kolobeng—Arrives at Cape Town, where his wife and children embark for England—Reaches Kuruman—The Dutch Boers—Linyanti—Received by the Makololo—Fever.
    • Travels of Dr Livingstone—first expedition.
    • His parentage and early life—Sets out for Africa as a missionary from the London Missionary Society—Arrives at Cape Town—Lepelole—Mabotsa—Sechele—Dr Livingstone finds him at Kolobeng—A missionary’s necessary accomplishments—The Kalahara Desert described—Starting—The banks of the Zouga—Lake Ngami—Return to Kolobeng—Return to Lake Ngami—Fever—Set out again and reach the Chobe—Sebituane—Banks of the Zambesi—Returns to Kolobeng—Arrives at Cape Town, where his wife and children embark for England—Reaches Kuruman—The Dutch Boers—Linyanti—Received by the Makololo—Fever.
    • Chapter Nineteen.
      • Travels of Dr Livingstone, continued.
      • Set out—Sesheke—Makololo architecture—Village of Katonga—Paddle up the Leeambye—Mpepe—Naliele—Visit Ma-Sekeletu—A grand dance—Return to Linyanti—Expedition to the West—On the Chobe—Gonye Falls—Up the Leeanibye—Up the Leeba—The Balonda country—Manenko—Visits Shinti—Reception of Livingstone—Proceeds northerly—Visit Katema—Reach the territory of the Chiboque—Want of food—A mutiny—The banks of the Quango—Reach Kasenge—Sleeping-places on the road—Ambaca—Trombeta—Arrive at Loanda—Livingstone, with his Makololo, goes on board the “Pluto” and “Philomel”—The city of Loanda—Departure—Ascend the river Bengo to Icollo-i-Bengo—Golcongo Alto—Excursion to Kasenge—Proceed to, and arrive on, the banks of the Quango—Bashinji country—Attacked—Reach Calongo—Kanawa’s village—Past Lake Dilolo—Shuiti’s capital—On the Leeba—The Lecambye—The town of Lebouta—Proceeding, arrives at Sesheke and afterwards at Linyanti.
    • Travels of Dr Livingstone, continued.
    • Set out—Sesheke—Makololo architecture—Village of Katonga—Paddle up the Leeambye—Mpepe—Naliele—Visit Ma-Sekeletu—A grand dance—Return to Linyanti—Expedition to the West—On the Chobe—Gonye Falls—Up the Leeanibye—Up the Leeba—The Balonda country—Manenko—Visits Shinti—Reception of Livingstone—Proceeds northerly—Visit Katema—Reach the territory of the Chiboque—Want of food—A mutiny—The banks of the Quango—Reach Kasenge—Sleeping-places on the road—Ambaca—Trombeta—Arrive at Loanda—Livingstone, with his Makololo, goes on board the “Pluto” and “Philomel”—The city of Loanda—Departure—Ascend the river Bengo to Icollo-i-Bengo—Golcongo Alto—Excursion to Kasenge—Proceed to, and arrive on, the banks of the Quango—Bashinji country—Attacked—Reach Calongo—Kanawa’s village—Past Lake Dilolo—Shuiti’s capital—On the Leeba—The Lecambye—The town of Lebouta—Proceeding, arrives at Sesheke and afterwards at Linyanti.
    • Chapter Twenty.
      • Travels of Dr Livingstone, continued.
      • Prepares for a journey to the East Coast—Leaves Linyanti—A storm—The Victoria and Mozioatunya Falls—From Kalai sets off for Lekone—Cross the Kafue—The Zambesi—Down its banks—Reach the confluence of the Loangwa—Mburuma’s Plot—Zumbo, a ruined Portuguese settlement—A curious reception—Arrival at Tete—A good breakfast—Tete described—Down the Quillimane—Embarks with Sekwebu on board the “Frolic”—Arrives at Mauritius—Sekwebu drowns himself—Livingstone arrives in England.
    • Travels of Dr Livingstone, continued.
    • Prepares for a journey to the East Coast—Leaves Linyanti—A storm—The Victoria and Mozioatunya Falls—From Kalai sets off for Lekone—Cross the Kafue—The Zambesi—Down its banks—Reach the confluence of the Loangwa—Mburuma’s Plot—Zumbo, a ruined Portuguese settlement—A curious reception—Arrival at Tete—A good breakfast—Tete described—Down the Quillimane—Embarks with Sekwebu on board the “Frolic”—Arrives at Mauritius—Sekwebu drowns himself—Livingstone arrives in England.
    • Chapter Twenty One.
      • Dr Livingstone’s second expedition to Africa, to explore the Zambesi.
      • Leaves England—Arrives at the East Coast—Up the Luawe—The little “Ma-Robert”—War—Commence the voyage for Tete—Senna—Arrives at Tete—The Kebrabasa Falls—Returns to Tete—Up the Shire, and return—The second trip up the Shire—Sets out for Lake Shirwa—Returns to Tete—Set out for Lake Nyassa—Treachery—Arrive at the Lake—Returns to the Kongone—Journey westward—A pondoro—Superstition—Passing Kebrabasa, arrive in Mpende’s territory—Reaches Moachemba—Sets out for Victoria Falls—Tuba, the smasher of canoes—Leave Sesheke—More Superstition—Reach Zunibo—Down the Kebrabasa Rapids—Canoes upset—Arrive at Tete—The chameleon.
    • Dr Livingstone’s second expedition to Africa, to explore the Zambesi.
    • Leaves England—Arrives at the East Coast—Up the Luawe—The little “Ma-Robert”—War—Commence the voyage for Tete—Senna—Arrives at Tete—The Kebrabasa Falls—Returns to Tete—Up the Shire, and return—The second trip up the Shire—Sets out for Lake Shirwa—Returns to Tete—Set out for Lake Nyassa—Treachery—Arrive at the Lake—Returns to the Kongone—Journey westward—A pondoro—Superstition—Passing Kebrabasa, arrive in Mpende’s territory—Reaches Moachemba—Sets out for Victoria Falls—Tuba, the smasher of canoes—Leave Sesheke—More Superstition—Reach Zunibo—Down the Kebrabasa Rapids—Canoes upset—Arrive at Tete—The chameleon.
    • Chapter Twenty Two.
      • Dr Livingstone’s expedition to explore the Zambesi, continued.
      • Sets out again—Christmas at Chimba Island—Senna—Down the river to Congo—The “Pioneer”—Arrival of Bishop Mackenzie—Reaches the Rovuma—Back again and up the Zambesi to the Shire—Liberation of a party of slaves—News of the Ajawa Starts for Nyassa—Enters the Lake—Described—A storm on the Nyassa—Slavery—Returns to the Rovuma—Sets out with Bishop Mackenzie for Ruo—Reaches the Zambesi, and afterwards proceeds to the Great Luabo—Arrival of Mrs Livingstone and the “Lady Nyassa”—Bishop Mackenzie’s death—Explores the Rovuma—An adventure with the natives—Visits Johanna in the “Pioneer”—Steams up the Shire—Effects of the slave trade—Meets Mr Thornton—Attacked by fever—More of the slave trade—Start for the upper cataracts—Despatches from England—Visit Chia Lakelet—An Arab slave-dhow—Leaves the Zambesi, and arrives at Bombay.
    • Dr Livingstone’s expedition to explore the Zambesi, continued.
    • Sets out again—Christmas at Chimba Island—Senna—Down the river to Congo—The “Pioneer”—Arrival of Bishop Mackenzie—Reaches the Rovuma—Back again and up the Zambesi to the Shire—Liberation of a party of slaves—News of the Ajawa Starts for Nyassa—Enters the Lake—Described—A storm on the Nyassa—Slavery—Returns to the Rovuma—Sets out with Bishop Mackenzie for Ruo—Reaches the Zambesi, and afterwards proceeds to the Great Luabo—Arrival of Mrs Livingstone and the “Lady Nyassa”—Bishop Mackenzie’s death—Explores the Rovuma—An adventure with the natives—Visits Johanna in the “Pioneer”—Steams up the Shire—Effects of the slave trade—Meets Mr Thornton—Attacked by fever—More of the slave trade—Start for the upper cataracts—Despatches from England—Visit Chia Lakelet—An Arab slave-dhow—Leaves the Zambesi, and arrives at Bombay.
    • Chapter Twenty Three.
      • Travels of Sir Samuel and Lady Baker.
      • Arrival in Egypt—Cross the Nubian Desert—Residence at Berber—Resolves to learn Arabic—Journey towards Abyssinia commenced—First meal on hippo-flesh.—A whirlwind—The river suddenly fills—Cause of the overflow of the Nile—Rainy season begins—Visit to camp of Abou Sinn—Residence at Son—Engage Germans—Hippopotamus hunting—Hamran elephant hunters—Mode of hunting—Abou Do a hippopotamus hunter—Exciting attack on a hippopotamus—Baker witnesses attack on an elephant by Aggageers—Rodur’s courage—The travellers reach Khartoum.
    • Travels of Sir Samuel and Lady Baker.
    • Arrival in Egypt—Cross the Nubian Desert—Residence at Berber—Resolves to learn Arabic—Journey towards Abyssinia commenced—First meal on hippo-flesh.—A whirlwind—The river suddenly fills—Cause of the overflow of the Nile—Rainy season begins—Visit to camp of Abou Sinn—Residence at Son—Engage Germans—Hippopotamus hunting—Hamran elephant hunters—Mode of hunting—Abou Do a hippopotamus hunter—Exciting attack on a hippopotamus—Baker witnesses attack on an elephant by Aggageers—Rodur’s courage—The travellers reach Khartoum.
    • Chapter Twenty Four.
      • Travels of Sir Samuel and Lady Baker, continued.
      • Preparations for journey to the south—Difficulties—The Shillooks—The Nuehr—Information about the slave trade—The Kytch—The sacred bullock—Arrive at Gondokoro—Attempts to shoot Baker—His escort mutiny—He meets Speke and Grant—Treachery among his servants—Encounter with slave-traders—Wins over Ibrahim, and arrives at Tarrangolle—The Latooka victory—Misbehaviour of the Turks, and threatened attack by the natives—A funeral dance—Returns to Obbo—Fever—Sets out for Karuma—Reaches Karuma Falls—Kamrasi—Proceeds to the Lake—A strange reception—Illness of Mrs Baker—Reach the village of Parkani—Arrive at the lake which Baker called Albert Nyanza—Surveys it—Reaches Magimgo—Proceeds to the Murchison Falls—Return to Magimgo—Deserted by his guide and carriers—Starvation—The guide reappears, and they arrive at Kamrasi’s camp—An invasion by Fowookas—Mr Baker prevents an attack—He at last sets off with Turkish traders, and arrives at Shooa—A march through the Bari—Reach Gondokoro—Voyage down the Nile—Welcomed at Khartoum—A dust-storm—Continuing their voyage, reach Berber, and at length arrive in England—Returns to Egypt—Organises an expedition to convey steamers up the Nile for Lake Nyanza, to oppose the slave trade.
    • Travels of Sir Samuel and Lady Baker, continued.
    • Preparations for journey to the south—Difficulties—The Shillooks—The Nuehr—Information about the slave trade—The Kytch—The sacred bullock—Arrive at Gondokoro—Attempts to shoot Baker—His escort mutiny—He meets Speke and Grant—Treachery among his servants—Encounter with slave-traders—Wins over Ibrahim, and arrives at Tarrangolle—The Latooka victory—Misbehaviour of the Turks, and threatened attack by the natives—A funeral dance—Returns to Obbo—Fever—Sets out for Karuma—Reaches Karuma Falls—Kamrasi—Proceeds to the Lake—A strange reception—Illness of Mrs Baker—Reach the village of Parkani—Arrive at the lake which Baker called Albert Nyanza—Surveys it—Reaches Magimgo—Proceeds to the Murchison Falls—Return to Magimgo—Deserted by his guide and carriers—Starvation—The guide reappears, and they arrive at Kamrasi’s camp—An invasion by Fowookas—Mr Baker prevents an attack—He at last sets off with Turkish traders, and arrives at Shooa—A march through the Bari—Reach Gondokoro—Voyage down the Nile—Welcomed at Khartoum—A dust-storm—Continuing their voyage, reach Berber, and at length arrive in England—Returns to Egypt—Organises an expedition to convey steamers up the Nile for Lake Nyanza, to oppose the slave trade.
    • Chapter Twenty Five.
      • Dr Livingstone’s third great expedition.
      • Dr Livingstone, with thirty followers, lands near mouth of Rovuma—Proceeds up bank of river—Misconduct of Sepoys—Loss of animals—Reaches Lake Nyassa—The Babisa Chief—Roguish Arab—Proceeds westward—Visits the Chambezi—Arrives at Kazembe’s city—Londa—Receptions by the King and his wife—Lake Mopo—Lake Moero—The Lualaba River—Proceeds down it—Other large lakes heard of—Compelled to return east—Treachery of a Moor—Three years occupied in exploring—Severe illness—Mild character of natives—Cruelties of the Arabs—Returns to Ujiji.
    • Dr Livingstone’s third great expedition.
    • Dr Livingstone, with thirty followers, lands near mouth of Rovuma—Proceeds up bank of river—Misconduct of Sepoys—Loss of animals—Reaches Lake Nyassa—The Babisa Chief—Roguish Arab—Proceeds westward—Visits the Chambezi—Arrives at Kazembe’s city—Londa—Receptions by the King and his wife—Lake Mopo—Lake Moero—The Lualaba River—Proceeds down it—Other large lakes heard of—Compelled to return east—Treachery of a Moor—Three years occupied in exploring—Severe illness—Mild character of natives—Cruelties of the Arabs—Returns to Ujiji.
    • Chapter Twenty Six.
      • Stanley’s expedition in search of Dr Livingstone.
      • Stanley sent out by Mr Bennett, of the “New York Herald”—Reaches Zanzibar—Dr Kirk—His white and native attendants—Bombay engaged—Boats prepared—Crosses to Bagomoyo—Jesuit mission—Finds caravan for relief of Livingstone detained—Difficulties to be surmounted—Porters abscond—Misconduct of white men—A strongly fortified town—Attacked by fever—Sends Farquhar sick to Mpwapwa, where he dies—Shaw fires at Stanley—Stanley’s cool conduct—Expedition enters Ugogo with Arab caravan—Heavy tribute demanded by Sultan of Mvumi—Donkeys die—Journey through jungle—Country laid waste by Arab slave-traders—Well received by Mkaswa—Livingstone caravan arrives—Prepares to start for Ujiji—Some of his men join Arabs in an attack on a town, and are defeated—Stanley and Shaw narrowly escape—Returns to Kivihara—The place threatened—Preparations for defence—Hears news of Livingstone—Receives present of a slave boy, Kiulu—Followers prove refractory—Sets out—Sends Shaw back—Narrow escape from a crocodile—Donkey seized by crocodile—Meet Caravan from Ujiji—More news of Livingstone—Threatened by Wahha—Pass village at night—Nearly discovered—Lake Tanganyika seen—Dr Livingstone found at last—Livingstone recovers—Character of Livingstone—Voyage on Lake Tanganyika—The Rusizi River—Livingstone and Stanley set off from Ujiji together—Journey to Mkaswa, and stay there—Livingstone remains, and Stanley proceeds to Zanzibar to fit out an expedition to assist him—Finds Kisalungo destroyed by a flood—Dreadful floods—Adventures on journey—Meets with the Livingstone relief expedition—It is disbanded—Disbands his own, and fits out a fresh one—Starts it off, and sails for England via the Seychelles—Noble liberality of Mr Bennett.
    • Stanley’s expedition in search of Dr Livingstone.
    • Stanley sent out by Mr Bennett, of the “New York Herald”—Reaches Zanzibar—Dr Kirk—His white and native attendants—Bombay engaged—Boats prepared—Crosses to Bagomoyo—Jesuit mission—Finds caravan for relief of Livingstone detained—Difficulties to be surmounted—Porters abscond—Misconduct of white men—A strongly fortified town—Attacked by fever—Sends Farquhar sick to Mpwapwa, where he dies—Shaw fires at Stanley—Stanley’s cool conduct—Expedition enters Ugogo with Arab caravan—Heavy tribute demanded by Sultan of Mvumi—Donkeys die—Journey through jungle—Country laid waste by Arab slave-traders—Well received by Mkaswa—Livingstone caravan arrives—Prepares to start for Ujiji—Some of his men join Arabs in an attack on a town, and are defeated—Stanley and Shaw narrowly escape—Returns to Kivihara—The place threatened—Preparations for defence—Hears news of Livingstone—Receives present of a slave boy, Kiulu—Followers prove refractory—Sets out—Sends Shaw back—Narrow escape from a crocodile—Donkey seized by crocodile—Meet Caravan from Ujiji—More news of Livingstone—Threatened by Wahha—Pass village at night—Nearly discovered—Lake Tanganyika seen—Dr Livingstone found at last—Livingstone recovers—Character of Livingstone—Voyage on Lake Tanganyika—The Rusizi River—Livingstone and Stanley set off from Ujiji together—Journey to Mkaswa, and stay there—Livingstone remains, and Stanley proceeds to Zanzibar to fit out an expedition to assist him—Finds Kisalungo destroyed by a flood—Dreadful floods—Adventures on journey—Meets with the Livingstone relief expedition—It is disbanded—Disbands his own, and fits out a fresh one—Starts it off, and sails for England via the Seychelles—Noble liberality of Mr Bennett.
    • Chapter Twenty Seven.
      • Conclusion.
      • Travels of Burton—Du Chaillu—Baines—Andersson—Galton—Expeditions up the Niger—Dr Baikie’s voyage in the “Pleiad”—Journeys of missionaries, sportsmen, and others—Concluding remarks.
      • The End.
    • Conclusion.
    • Travels of Burton—Du Chaillu—Baines—Andersson—Galton—Expeditions up the Niger—Dr Baikie’s voyage in the “Pleiad”—Journeys of missionaries, sportsmen, and others—Concluding remarks.
    • The End.
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