The English Husbandman The First Part: Contayning the Knowledge of the true Nature of euery Soyle within this Kingdome: how to Plow it; and the manner of the Plough, and other Instruments
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The English Husbandman The First Part: Contayning the Knowledge of the true Nature of euery Soyle within this Kingdome: how to Plow it; and the manner of the Plough, and other Instruments

By Gervase Markham
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Table of Contents
  • Transcriber's note
    • Contents
  • THE ENGLISH HVSBANDMAN.
    • TO THE RIGHT HONOVRABLE, and his singular good Lord, the Lord Clifton, Baron of Layton.
    • The Epistle to the generall and gentle Reader.
    • A FORMER PART, before the first Part: Being an absolute perfect Introduction into all the Rules of true Husbandry; and must first of all be read, or the Readers labour will be frustrate.
      • Chap. I. The Proem of the Author. What a Husbandman is: His Vtilitie and Necessitie.
      • Chap. II. Of the situation of the Husbandmans house; the necessaries there to belonging, together with the modell thereof.
      • Chap. III. Of the seuerall parts and members of an ordinarie Plough, and of the ioyning of them together.
      • Chap. IIII. How the Husbandman shall temper his Plough, and make her fit for his worke.
      • Chap. V. The manner of Plowing the rich, stiffe, blacke Clay, his Earings, Plough, and other Instruments.
      • Chap. VI. The manner of plowing the white or gray Clay, his Earings, Plough, and Instruments.
      • Chap. VII. The manner of plowing the red-Sand, his Earings, Plough, and Implements.
      • Chap. VIII. The manner of plowing the white Sand, his Earings, Plough, and Implements.
      • Chap. IX. The manner of plowing the Grauell with Pible stones, or the Grauell with Flint, their Earings, Plough, and implements.
      • Chap. X. The manner of plowing the blacke Clay mixt with red Sand, and the white Clay mixt with white Sand, their Earings, Plough and Implements.
    • Chap. I. The Proem of the Author. What a Husbandman is: His Vtilitie and Necessitie.
    • Chap. II. Of the situation of the Husbandmans house; the necessaries there to belonging, together with the modell thereof.
    • Chap. III. Of the seuerall parts and members of an ordinarie Plough, and of the ioyning of them together.
    • Chap. IIII. How the Husbandman shall temper his Plough, and make her fit for his worke.
    • Chap. V. The manner of Plowing the rich, stiffe, blacke Clay, his Earings, Plough, and other Instruments.
    • Chap. VI. The manner of plowing the white or gray Clay, his Earings, Plough, and Instruments.
    • Chap. VII. The manner of plowing the red-Sand, his Earings, Plough, and Implements.
    • Chap. VIII. The manner of plowing the white Sand, his Earings, Plough, and Implements.
    • Chap. IX. The manner of plowing the Grauell with Pible stones, or the Grauell with Flint, their Earings, Plough, and implements.
    • Chap. X. The manner of plowing the blacke Clay mixt with red Sand, and the white Clay mixt with white Sand, their Earings, Plough and Implements.
    • THE FIRST PART OF THE ENGLISH Husbandman: Contayning, the manner of plowing and Manuring all sorts of Soyles, together with the manner of planting and setting of Corne.
      • Chap. I. Of the manner of plowing all simple Earths, which are vncompounded.
      • Chap. II. Of the manner of plowing the blacke clay mixt with white sand, and the white clay mixt with red sand: their Earrings, Plough, and Implements.
      • Chap. III. A comparison of all the former soyles together, and most especiall notes for giuing the ignorant Husbandman perfect vnderstanding, of what is written before.
      • Chap. IIII. Of the planting or setting of Corne, and the profit thereof.
      • Chap. V. Of the choice of seede-Corne, and which is best for which soyle.
      • Chap. VI. Of the time of Haruest and the gathering in of Corne.
    • Chap. I. Of the manner of plowing all simple Earths, which are vncompounded.
    • Chap. II. Of the manner of plowing the blacke clay mixt with white sand, and the white clay mixt with red sand: their Earrings, Plough, and Implements.
    • Chap. III. A comparison of all the former soyles together, and most especiall notes for giuing the ignorant Husbandman perfect vnderstanding, of what is written before.
    • Chap. IIII. Of the planting or setting of Corne, and the profit thereof.
    • Chap. V. Of the choice of seede-Corne, and which is best for which soyle.
    • Chap. VI. Of the time of Haruest and the gathering in of Corne.
    • THE SECOND PART OF THE FIRST BOOKE OF the English Husbandman, Contayning the Art of Planting, Grafting and Gardening, either for pleasure or profit; together with the vse and ordering of Woodes.
      • Chap. I. Of the Scyte, Modell, Squares, and Fashion of a perfect Orchard.
      • Chap. II. Of the Nurserie where you shall set all manner of Kernels, and Stones, for the furnishing of the Orchard.
      • Chap. III. Of the setting or planting of the Cyons or Branches of most sorts of Fruit-trees.
      • Chap. IIII. Of the ordinary and accustomed manner of Grafting all sorts of Fruit-trees.
      • Chap. V. Of diuers other wayes of grafting, their vses and purposes.
      • Chap. VI. Of the replanting of Trees, and furnishing the Orchard.
      • Chap. VII. Of the Dressing, Dungging, Proyning, and Preseruing of Trees.
      • Chap. VIII. Of the Vine, and of his ordering.
      • Chap. IX. The office of the Fruiterrer, or the Gatherer, and keeper, of Fruit.
      • Chap. X. Of the making of Cyder, or Perry.
      • Chap. XI. Of the Hoppe-garden, and first of the ground and situation thereof.
      • Chap. XII. Of the ordering of the Garden, and placing of the Hils.
      • Chap. XIII. Of the gathering of Hoppes, and the preseruing of the Poales.
      • Chap. XIIII. Of drying, and not drying of Hoppes, and of packing them when they are dried.
      • Chap. XV. The office of the Gardiner, and first of the Earth, Situation, and fencing of a Garden for pleasure.
      • Chap. XVI. Of the fashion of the garden-plot for pleasure, the Alleyes, Quarters, Digging and Dungging of the same.
      • Chap. XVII. Of the adornation and beautifying of the Garden for pleasure.
      • Chap. XVIII. How for the entertainment of any great Person, in any Parke, or other place of pleasure, where Sommer-bowers are made, to make a compleat Garden in two or three dayes.
      • Chap. XIX. How to preserue Abricots, or any kinde of curious outlandish-stone-fruit, and make them beare plentifully be the Spring or beginning of Summer neuer so bitter.
      • Chap. XX. How to make Grapes grow as bigge, full, and as naturally, and to ripen in as due season, and be as long lasting as either in Fraunce or Spaine.
        • Transcriber's notes
      • Transcriber's notes
    • Chap. I. Of the Scyte, Modell, Squares, and Fashion of a perfect Orchard.
    • Chap. II. Of the Nurserie where you shall set all manner of Kernels, and Stones, for the furnishing of the Orchard.
    • Chap. III. Of the setting or planting of the Cyons or Branches of most sorts of Fruit-trees.
    • Chap. IIII. Of the ordinary and accustomed manner of Grafting all sorts of Fruit-trees.
    • Chap. V. Of diuers other wayes of grafting, their vses and purposes.
    • Chap. VI. Of the replanting of Trees, and furnishing the Orchard.
    • Chap. VII. Of the Dressing, Dungging, Proyning, and Preseruing of Trees.
    • Chap. VIII. Of the Vine, and of his ordering.
    • Chap. IX. The office of the Fruiterrer, or the Gatherer, and keeper, of Fruit.
    • Chap. X. Of the making of Cyder, or Perry.
    • Chap. XI. Of the Hoppe-garden, and first of the ground and situation thereof.
    • Chap. XII. Of the ordering of the Garden, and placing of the Hils.
    • Chap. XIII. Of the gathering of Hoppes, and the preseruing of the Poales.
    • Chap. XIIII. Of drying, and not drying of Hoppes, and of packing them when they are dried.
    • Chap. XV. The office of the Gardiner, and first of the Earth, Situation, and fencing of a Garden for pleasure.
    • Chap. XVI. Of the fashion of the garden-plot for pleasure, the Alleyes, Quarters, Digging and Dungging of the same.
    • Chap. XVII. Of the adornation and beautifying of the Garden for pleasure.
    • Chap. XVIII. How for the entertainment of any great Person, in any Parke, or other place of pleasure, where Sommer-bowers are made, to make a compleat Garden in two or three dayes.
    • Chap. XIX. How to preserue Abricots, or any kinde of curious outlandish-stone-fruit, and make them beare plentifully be the Spring or beginning of Summer neuer so bitter.
    • Chap. XX. How to make Grapes grow as bigge, full, and as naturally, and to ripen in as due season, and be as long lasting as either in Fraunce or Spaine.
      • Transcriber's notes
    • Transcriber's notes
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