Free

The Sea: Its Stirring Story of Adventure, Peril, & Heroism. Volume 3

By Frederick Whymper
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • THE SEA
    • BY
      • ILLUSTRATED.
    • ILLUSTRATED.
  • CONTENTS.
    • CHAPTER I. THE PIRATES AND BUCANIERS. PAGE Who was the First Pirate?—The Society of Bucaniers—Home of the 1 Freebooters—Rise of the Band—Impecunious Spanish Governors and their Roguery—Great Capture of Spanish Treasure—An Unjust Seizure, but no Redress—Esquemeling’s Narrative—Voyage from Havre—“Baptism” of the French Mariners—Other Ceremonies—At Tortuga—Occupied and Reoccupied by French and Spanish—The French West India Company—Esquemeling twice Sold as a Slave—He Joins the Society of Pirates—Wild Boars and Savage Mastiffs—How the Wild Dogs came to the Islands—Cruelty of the Planters—A Terrible Case of Retribution—The Murderer of a Hundred Slaves—The First Tortugan Pirate—Pierre le Grand—A Desperate Attack—Rich Prize Taken—Rapid Spread of Piracy—How the Rovers Armed their Ships—Regulations of their Voyages—“No Prey, no Pay”—The richly-laden Vessels of New Spain—The Pearl Fisheries—An Enterprising Pirate—Success and Failure—His Final Surrender CHAPTER II. THE PIRATES AND BUCANIERS (continued). The Pirate Portuguez—Another Successful Boat Attack—Re-taken—A 13 Gibbet or Life—Escape—Saved by Two Wine-jars—Helped by the Pirates—Rich again—And suddenly Poor—A Dutch Pirate—From Sailor to Captain—A Grand Capture—And a brutal Commander—No Surrender to the Spaniards—Victory and Horse-flesh—The Rover’s Prodigality—A Stratagem—Worse than Ever—The Spaniards reduce their Commerce—Lewis Scot—John Davis—Outrages at Nicaragua—Piratical Gains—Lolonois the Bad and Brave—His First Wounds—And his Early Successes—Six Hundred and Sixty Pirates—The Capture of Maracaibo and Gibraltar—Division of the Gains—His Brutalities—And Deserved Death CHAPTER III. THE PIRATES AND BUCANIERS (continued). The Second Lolonois—Captain Henry Morgan—His first Successes—A 29 Pirate Fleet of Seven Hundred Men—Attack on a Cuban Town—Morgan’s Form—Not to be Beaten—Puerto Bello—Morgan’s Strategy—The Castle taken—Extravagant Demands—The Governor of Panama Derided—Return to Jamaica—Their Dissipation—A Fresh Start—Maracaibo re-taken—A Chance for Guy Fawkes—Gibraltar again—Cruel Tortures inflicted on Prisoners—Horrible Brutalities—Arrival of a Spanish Fleet—Morgan’s Insolence—Letter from the Spanish Admiral—“To the Death!” CHAPTER IV. THE PIRATES AND BUCANIERS (continued). Attack resolved—The Fire-ship—Morgan passes the Castle—Off for 40 St. Catherine’s—Given up by a Stratagem—St. Catherine’s an Easy Prey—Power of Fire—Thirty in Three Hundred Saved—The March on Panama—A Pirate Band of Twelve Hundred—Sufferings on the Way—A Pipe for Supper—Leather and Cold Water—Panama at Last—The First Encounter—Resolute Fighting—Wild Bulls in Warfare—Victory for the Pirates—Ruthless Destruction of Property—Cruelty to Prisoners—Searching for Treasure—Dissatisfaction at the Dividend—The Last of Morgan CHAPTER V. THE PIRATES AND BUCANIERS (continued). The Exploits of Captain Sawkins—Three Ships Attacked by 51 Canoes—Valiant Peralta—Explosion on Board—Miserable Sight on Two Ships’ Decks—Capture of an Empty Ship—Dissatisfaction among the Pirates—Desertion of Many—Message from the Governor of Panama—The Pirate Captain’s Bravado—His Death—Fear inspired on all the Southern Coasts—Preparations for Punishing and Hindering the Bucaniers—Captain Kidd—His First Commission as Privateer—Turns Pirate—The Mocha Fleet—Almost a Mutiny on Board—Kills his Gunner—Capture of Rich Prizes—A Rich Ransom Derided—Grand Dividend—Kidd Deserted by some of his Men—Proclamation of Pardon—Kidd Excepted—Rushes on his Doom—Arrested in New York—Trial at the Old Bailey—Pleadings—Execution with Six Companions CHAPTER VI. THE PIRATES OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. Difference between the Pirates of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth 59 Centuries—Avery’s brief Career—A Captain all at Sea—Capture of his Ship—Madagascar a Rendezvous for Pirates—A Rich Prize—The Great Mogul’s Ship Taken—Immense Spoils—The Great Mogul’s Rage—Avery’s Treachery—His Companions abandon their Evil Ways—The Water-rat beaten by Land-rats—Avery dies in abject Poverty—A Pirate Settlement on Madagascar—Roberts the Daring—Sails among a Portuguese Fleet, and selects the best Vessel for his Prey—His Brutal Destruction of Property—His End—Misson and Caraccioli—Communistic Pirates—Their Captures—High Morality and Robbery Combined—Their Fates CHAPTER VII. THE PIRATES OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (concluded). Mary Read, the Female Pirate—As Male Servant, Soldier, and 67 Sailor—Her Bravery and Modesty—The Pirate Vane—No Honour among Thieves—Delivered to Justice—The brief Career of Captain Worley—The Biter Bit—A more than usually brutal Pirate—Captain Low’s Life of Villainy—His Wonderful Successes—An unfortunate Black Burned to Death—Torture of a Portuguese Captain—Of Two Portuguese Friars—The Results of Sympathy—Low’s Cupidity defeated by a Portuguese—Eleven Thousand Moidores dropped out of a Cabin Window—An Unpunished Fiend CHAPTER VIII. PAUL JONES AND DE SOTO. Paul Jones, the Privateer—A Story of his Boyhood—He Joins the 71 American Revolutionists—Attempt to Burn the Town and Shipping of Whitehaven—Foiled—His Appearance at St. Mary’s—Capture of Lady Selkirk’s Family Plate—A Letter from Jones—Return of the Plate several Years after—A Press-gang Impressed—Engagement with the Ranger—A Privateer Squadron—The Fight off Scarborough—Brave Captains Pearson and Piercy—Victory for the Privateers—Jones Dies in abject Poverty—A Nineteenth Century Freebooter—Benito de Soto—Mutiny on a Slave Ship—The Commander left Ashore and the Mate Murdered—Encounters the Morning Star—A Ship without a Gun—Terror of the Passengers—Order to spare no Lives—A Terrified Steward—De Soto’s Commands only partially observed, and the Ship Saved—At Cadiz—Failure of the Pirate’s Plans—Captured, Tried, and Hanged at Gibraltar CHAPTER IX. OUR ARCTIC EXPEDITIONS. Our Latest Arctic Expedition—Scene at Portsmouth—Departure of the 84 Alert and Discovery—Few Expeditions really ever pointed to the Pole—What we know of the Regions—Admitted and Unadmitted Records—Dutch Yarns—A Claimant at the Pole—Life with the Esquimaux—A Solitary Journey—Northmen Colony—The Adventurer kindly treated—Their King—Sun-worshippers—Believers in an Arctic Hell—The Mastodon not Extinct—Domesticated Walruses—The whole story a nonsensical Canard CHAPTER X. CRUISE OF THE PANDORA. The Arctic Expedition of 1875-6—Its Advocates—The Alert and 91 Discovery—Cruise of the Pandora—Curious Icebergs—The First Bump with the Ice—Seal Meat as a Luxury—Ashore on a Floe—Coaling at Ivigtut—The Kryolite Trade—Beauty of the Greenland Coast in Summer—Festivities at Disco—The Belles of Greenland—A Novel Ball-room—The dreaded Melville Bay—Scene of Ruin at Northumberland House—Devastation of the Bears—An Arctic Graveyard—Beset by the Ice—An Interesting Discovery—Furthest Point Attained—Return Voyage—A Dreadful Night—The Phantom Cliff—Home again CHAPTER XI. THE ALERT AND DISCOVERY. Nares’ Expedition—Wonderful Passage through Baffin’s Bay—Winter 99 Quarters of the Discovery—Capital Game-bag—Continued Voyage of the Alert—Highest Latitude ever attained by a Ship—“The Sea of Ancient Ice”—Winter Quarters, Employments, and Amusements—The Royal Arctic Theatre—Guy Fawkes’ Day on the Ice—Christmas Festivities—Unparalleled Cold—Spring Sledging—Attempt to Reach the Discovery—Illness and Death of Petersen—The Ravages of Scurvy—Tribute to Captain Hall’s Memory—Markham and Parr’s Northern Journey—Highest Latitude ever reached—Sufferings of the Men—Brave Deeds—The Voyage Home CHAPTER XII. THE FIRST ARCTIC VOYAGES. Early History of Arctic Discovery—The Hardy Norseman—Accidental 115 Discovery of Iceland—Colony Formed—A Fisherman Drifted to Greenland—Eric the Red Head—Rapid Colonisation—Early Intercourse with America—Voyages of the Zeni—Cabot’s Attempt at a North-West Passage—Maritime Enterprise of this Epoch—Voyage of the Dominus Vobiscum—Of the Trinitie and Minion—Starvation and Cannibalism—A High-handed Proceeding—Company of the Merchant Adventurers—Attempts at the North-East—Fate of Willoughby—Chancelor, and our First Intercourse with Russia CHAPTER XIII. EARLY ARCTIC EXPEDITIONS. Attempts at the North-West Passage—Sir Humphrey Gilbert’s 123 Advocacy—The One thing left undone—Frobisher’s Expeditions—Arctic “Diggins”—A Veritable Gold Excitement—Large Fleet Despatched—Disaster and Disappointment—Voyages of John Davis—Intercourse with the Natives—His Reports concerning Whales, &c.—The Merchants Aroused—Opening of the Whaling Trade—Maldonado’s Claim to the Discovery of the North-West Passage CHAPTER XIV. THE VOYAGES OF BARENTS. North-Eastern Voyages of the Dutch—Barents reaches Nova 129 Zembla—Adventures with the Polar Bears—Large Trading Expedition organised—Failure of the Venture—Reward Offered for the Discovery of a North-East Passage—Third Voyage—Dangers of the Ice—Forced to Winter on Nova Zembla—Erection of a House—Intense Cold—Philosophical Dutchmen—Attacks from Bears—Returning Spring—The Vessel Abandoned—Preparations for a Start—The Company Enfeebled and Down-hearted—Voyage of 1,700 miles in Two Small Boats—Death of Barents and Adrianson—Perils of Arctic Navigation—Enclosed in the Ice—Death of a Sailor—Meeting with Russians—Arrival in Lapland—Home once more—Discovery of the Barents Relics by Carlsen—Voyages of Adams, Weymouth, Hall, and Knight CHAPTER XV. VOYAGES OF HUDSON AND HIS SUCCESSORS. Henry Hudson’s Voyages—Projected Passage over the Pole—Second 144 Expedition—A Mermaid Sighted—Third Voyage in the Dutch Service—Discovery of the Hudson River—Last Voyage—Discovery of Hudson’s Bay—Story of an Arctic Tragedy—Abacuk Pricket’s Narrative—Their Winter Stay—Rise of a Mutiny—Hudson and Nine Companions Set Adrift and Left to Die—Retribution—Four of the Mutineers Killed—Sufferings from Starvation—Death of a Ringleader—Arrival in Ireland—Suspicious Circumstances—Baffin’s Voyages—Danish Expeditions to Greenland—Jens Munk and his Unfortunate Companions—Sixty-one Persons Starved to Death—Voyage of Three Survivors across the Atlantic—An unkingly King—Death of Munk—Moxon’s Dutch Beer-house Story—Wood and Flawes—Wreck of Wood’s Vessel—Knight’s Fatal Expedition—Slow Starvation and Death of the whole Company—The Middleton and Dobbs’ Agitation—£20,000 offered for the Discovery of the North-West Passage CHAPTER XVI. EXPEDITIONS IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. Paucity of Arctic Expeditions in the Eighteenth Century—Phipps’ 154 Voyage—Walls of Ice—Ferocious Sea-horses—A Beautiful Glacier—Cook’s Voyage—A Fresh Attempt—Extension of the Government Rewards—Cape Prince of Wales—Among the Tchuktchis—Icy Cape—Baffled by the Ice—Russian Voyages—The two Unconquerable Capes—Peter the Great—Behring’s Voyages—Discovery of the Straits—The Third Voyage—Scurvy and Shipwreck—Death of the Commander—New Siberia—The Ivory Islands CHAPTER XVII. THE EXPEDITIONS OF ROSS AND PARRY. Remarkable Change in the Greenland Ice-Fields—Immense Icebergs 162 found out of their Latitudes—Ross the First’s Expedition—Festivities among the Danes—Interviews with Esquimaux—Crimson Snow—A Mythical Discovery—The Croker Mountains—Buchan’s Expedition—Bursting of Icebergs—Effects of Concussion—The Creation of an Iceberg—Spitzbergen in Summer—Animated Nature—Millions of Birds—Refuge in an Ice-pack—Parry and his Exploits—His Noble Character—First Arctic Voyage—Sails over the Croker Mountains CHAPTER XVIII. PARRY’S EXPEDITIONS (continued). Five Thousand Pounds Earned by Parry’s Expedition—Winter 170 Quarters—Theatre—An Arctic Newspaper—Effects of Intense Cold—The Observatory Burned Down—Return to England—Parry’s Second Expedition—“Young” Ice—Winter at Lyon’s Inlet—A Snow Village in Winter and Spring—Break-up of the Ice—The Vessels in a Terrible Position—Third Winter Quarters—Parry’s Fourth Winter—The Fury Abandoned—The Old Griper and her Noble Crew CHAPTER XIX. PARRY’S BOAT AND SLEDGE EXPEDITION. Parry’s Attempt at the Pole—Hecla Cove—Boat and Sledge 178 Expedition—Mode of Travelling—Their Camps—Laborious Efforts—Broken Ice—Midnight Dinners and Afternoon Breakfasts—Labours of Sisyphus—Drifting Ice—Highest Latitude Reached—Return Trip to the Ship—Parry’s Subsequent Career—Wrangell’s Ice Journeys CHAPTER XX. THE MAGNETIC POLE—A LAND JOURNEY TO THE POLAR SEA. Sir John Ross and the Victory—First Steam Vessel Employed in 186 the Arctic—Discovery of the Magnetic Pole—The British Flag Waving over it—Franklin and Richardson’s Journeys to the Polar Sea—The Coppermine River—Sea voyage in Birch-bark Canoes—Return Journey—Terrible Sufferings—Starvation and Utter Exhaustion—Deaths by the Way—A Brave Feat—Relieved at Length—Journey to the Mouth of the Mackenzie—Fracas with the Esquimaux—Peace Restored CHAPTER XXI. VOYAGE OF THE TERROR. Back’s effort to reach Repulse Bay—Nine Months in the Ice—The 196 Terror Nipped and Crushed—A General Disruption—Extreme Peril—Increase of Pressure—Providential Delivery—Another Nip—Bow of the Ship Split—Preparations for Emergencies—The Crew—An early Break-up—Frozen Again—A Tremendous Rush of Ice—The Day of Release CHAPTER XXII. FRANKLIN’S LAST VOYAGE. Sir John Franklin and his Career—His Last Expedition—Takes the 201 Command as his Birthright—The last seen of his Ships—Alarm at their Long Absence—The Search—A few Faint Traces Discovered by Parry—A Fleet beset in the Ice—Efforts made to Communicate with Franklin—Rockets and Balloons—M’Clure’s Expedition—Discovery of the North-West Passage—Strange Arrival of Lieutenant Pim over the Ice—The Investigator Abandoned—Crew Saved—Reward of £10,000 to M’Clure and his Ship’s Company CHAPTER XXIII. THE FRANKLIN SEARCH. The Franklin Expedition—The First Relics—Dr. Rae’s 215 Discoveries—The Government Tired of the Search—Noble Lady Franklin—The Voyage of the Fox—Beset in the Ice for Eight Months—Enormous Icebergs—Seal and Bear Hunts—Unearthly Noises under the Floes—Guy Fawkes in the Arctic—The Fiftieth Seal Shot—A Funeral—A Merry Christmas—New Year’s Celebration—Winter Gales—Their Miraculous Escape—Experience of a Whaler—Breakfast and Ship Lost together CHAPTER XXIV. THE LAST TRACES. M’Clintock’s Summer Explorations—The Second Winter—Sledging 223 Parties—Snow Huts—Near the Magnetic Pole—Meeting with Esquimaux—Franklin Relics Obtained—Objection of Esquimaux to Speak of the Dead—Hobson’s Discovery of the Franklin Records—Fate of the Erebus and Terror—Large Quantity of Relics Purchased from the Natives—The Skeleton on the Beach—Fate of Crozier’s Party—“As they Fell they Died”—The Record at Point Victory—Boat with Human Remains Discovered—The Wrecks never Seen—Return of the Fox CHAPTER XXV. KANE’S MEMORABLE EXPEDITION. Dr. Kane’s Expedition—His short but eventful Career—Departure of 232 the Advance—Dangers of the Voyage—Grinding Ice—Among the Bergs—A Close Shave—Nippings—The Brig towed from the Ice-beach—Smith’s Sound—Rensselaer Harbour—Winter Quarters—Return of an Exploring Party—Fearful Sufferings—To the Rescue—Saved—Curious Effects of Intense Cold CHAPTER XXVI. KANE’S EXPEDITION (continued). Arrival of Esquimaux at the Brig—A Treaty Concluded—Hospitality 238 on Board—Arctic Appetites—Sledge Journeys—A Break-down—Morton’s Trip—The Open Sea—The Brig hopelessly Beset—A Council Called—Eight Men stand by the Advance—Departure of the Rest—Their Return—Terrible Sufferings—A Characteristic Entry—Raw Meat for Food—Fruitless Journeys for Fresh Meat—A Scurvied Crew—Starving Esquimaux—Attempted Desertion—A Deserter brought back from the Esquimaux Settlements CHAPTER XXVII. KANE’S EXPEDITION (concluded). A Sad Entry—Farewell to the Brig—Departure for the South—Death of 247 Ohlsen—Difficult Travelling—The Open Water—The Esquimaux of Etah—A Terrible Gale—Among the broken Floes—A Greenland Oasis—The Ice Cliff—Eggs by the Hundred—An Anxious Moment—A Savage Feast—The First Sign of Civilisation—Return to the Settlements—Home once more CHAPTER XXVIII. HAYES’ EXPEDITION—SWEDISH EXPEDITIONS. Voyage of the United States—High Latitude attained—In Winter 255 Quarters—Hardships of the Voyage—The dreary Arctic Landscape—Open Water once more—1,300 Miles of Ice traversed—Swedish Expeditions—Perilous Position of the Sofia CHAPTER XXIX. THE SECOND GERMAN EXPEDITION. The First German Expedition—Preparations for a Second—Building of 258 the Germania—The Hansa—The Emperor William’s Interest in the Voyage—The Scientific Corps—Departure from Bremerhaven—Neptune at the Arctic Circle—The Vessels Separated among the Ice—Sport with Polar Bears—Wedged in by the Grinding Ice—Preparations to Winter on the Floe—The Hansa lifted Seventeen Feet out of the Water—A Doomed Vessel—Wreck of the Hansa CHAPTER XXX. ON AN ICE-RAFT. A Floating Ice-Raft—The Settlement—Christmas in a New 263 Position—Terrible Storms—Commotion under the Ice—The Floe breaks up—House Ruined—Water on the Floe—A Spectre Iceberg—Fresh Dangers and Deliverances—Drifted 1,100 Miles—Resolution to Leave the Ice—Open Water—Ice again—Tedious Progress—Reach Illuidlek Island—Welcome at the Greenland Settlements—Home in Germany—Voyage of the Germania—Discovery of Coal—A New Inlet—Home to Bremen CHAPTER XXXI. HALL’S EXPEDITION—THE AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN EXPEDITION—NORDENSKJÖLD. Captain Hall’s Expedition—High Latitude Attained—Open Water 268 Seen—Death of Hall—The Polaris Beset—An Abandoned Party—Six Months on a Floating Ice-floe—Rescue—Loss of the Steamer—Investigation at Washington—The Austro-Hungarian Expedition—The Tegethoff hopelessly Beset in the Ice—Two Long Weary Years—Perils from the Ice Pressure—Ramparts raised round the Ship—The Polar Night—Loss of a Coal-hut—Attempts to Escape—A Grand Discovery—Franz Josef Land—Sledging Parties—Gigantic Glaciers—The Steamer Abandoned—Boat and Sledge Journey to the Bay of Downs—Prof. Nordenskjöld’s Voyage—The North-East Passage an accomplished Fact CHAPTER XXXII. THE ANTARCTIC REGIONS. Has the South Pole been Neglected?—The Antarctic even more 276 Inhospitable than the Arctic—The Antarctic Summer—Search for the Terra Australis—Early Explorers—Captain Cook’s Discoveries—Watering at Icebergs—The Southern Thule—Smith’s Report—Weddell’s Voyage—Dead Whale Mistaken for an Island—D’Urville’s Adélie Land—Wilkes Land—Voyages of James Ross—High Land Discovered—Deep Beds of Guano—Antarctic Volcanoes—Mounts Erebus and Terror—Victoria Land CHAPTER XXXIII. DECISIVE VOYAGES IN HISTORY.—DIAZ—COLUMBUS. An Important Epoch in the History of Discovery—King John II. of 281 Portugal and his Enterprises—Diaz the Bold—Ventures out to Sea—Rounds the Cape—Ignorant of the Fact—The Cape of Storms—King John re-christens it—Columbus and the Narrative of his Son—His Visit to Portugal—Marriage—An un-royal Trick—Sends his Brother to England—His Misfortune—Columbus in Spain—A prejudiced and ignorant Report—The One Sensible Ecclesiastic—Again Repulsed—A Friend at Court—Queen Isabella Won to the Cause—Departure of the Expedition—Out in the Broad Atlantic—Murmurs of the Crews—Signs of Land—Disappointment—Latent Mutiny—Land at Last—Discovery of St. Salvador—Cuba—Natives Smoking the Weed—Utopia in Hispaniola—Columbus Wrecked—Gold Obtained—First Spanish Settlement—Homeward Voyage—Storms and Vows—Arrival in Europe—Triumphant Reception at Barcelona CHAPTER XXXIV. DECISIVE VOYAGES IN HISTORY.—COLUMBUS—VASCO DA GAMA. Columbus and his Enemies—Unsuitable Settlers—Outrageous Conduct 294 of the Colonists—The Second Expedition of Columbus—Discovery of Jamaica—Dangerous Illness of Columbus—Return to Spain—The Excitement over—Difficulty of Starting a New Expedition—Third Voyage—Columbus reaches the Mainland of America—Insurrection in Hispaniola—Machinations at Home—Columbus brought to Spain in Chains—Indignation in Spain—His Fourth Voyage—Ferdinand’s Ingratitude—Death of the Great Navigator—Estimate of his Character—Vasco da Gama—First Voyage—The Cape reached—First Sight of India—At Calicut—Friendship of the King of Cananore—Great Profits of the Expedition—Second Voyage—Vengeance on the Ruler of Calicut—His Brutality—Subsequent History of Da Gama CHAPTER XXXV. THE COMPANIONS AND FOLLOWERS OF COLUMBUS. The Era of Spanish Discovery—Reasons for its Rapid 300 Development—Ojeda’s First Voyage—Fighting the Caribs—Indians and Cannon—Pinzon’s Discovery of Brazil—A Rough Reception—Bastides the Humane—A New Calamity—Ships leaking like Sieves—Economical Generosity of King Ferdinand—Ojeda’s Second Voyage—The disputed Strong-Box—Ojeda Entrapped—Swimming in Irons—Condemned Abroad—Acquitted at Home—A Triumphant Client, but a Ruined Man—A Third Voyage—Worthy La Cosa—Rival Commanders—A Foolish Challenge CHAPTER XXXVI. THE COMPANIONS AND FOLLOWERS OF COLUMBUS (concluded). Nicuesa and the Duns of San Domingo—Indian Contempt for a Royal 308 Manifesto—La Cosa’s Advice Disregarded—Ojeda’s Impetuosity—A Desperate Fight—Seventy Spaniards Killed—La Cosa’s Untimely End—Ojeda found Exhausted in the Woods—A Rival’s Noble Conduct—Avenged on the Indians—A New Settlement—Ojeda’s Charm fails—A Desperate Remedy—In Search of Provisions—Wrecked on Cuba—A Toilsome March—Kindly Natives—Ojeda’s Vow Redeemed—Dies in Abject Poverty—The Bachelor Enciso and Balboa—Smuggled on Board in a Tub—Leon and his Search for the Fountain of Youth—Discovery of Florida—Magellan—Snubbed at Home—Warmly Seconded by the Spanish Emperor—His Resolute Character—Discovery of the Straits—His Death—The First Voyage round the World—Captain Cook’s Discoveries—His Tragical Death—Vancouver’s Island
  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
    • THE SEA.
  • CHAPTER I.
    • THE PIRATES AND BUCANIERS.
  • CHAPTER II.
  • CHAPTER III.
  • CHAPTER IV.
  • CHAPTER V.
  • CHAPTER VI.
    • THE PIRATES OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.
  • CHAPTER VII.
    • THE PIRATES OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.
  • CHAPTER VIII.
    • PAUL JONES AND DE SOTO.
  • CHAPTER IX.
    • OUR ARCTIC EXPEDITIONS.
  • CHAPTER X.
    • CRUISE OF THE “PANDORA.”
  • CHAPTER XI.
    • THE “ALERT” AND “DISCOVERY.”
  • CHAPTER XII.
    • THE FIRST ARCTIC VOYAGES.
  • CHAPTER XIII.
    • EARLY ARCTIC EXPEDITIONS.
  • CHAPTER XIV.
  • CHAPTER XV.
  • CHAPTER XVI.
  • CHAPTER XVII.
    • THE EXPEDITIONS OF ROSS AND PARRY.
  • CHAPTER XVIII.
  • CHAPTER XIX.
    • PARRY’S BOAT AND SLEDGE EXPEDITION.
  • CHAPTER XX.
    • THE MAGNETIC POLE.—A LAND JOURNEY TO THE POLAR SEA.
  • CHAPTER XXI.
    • VOYAGE OF THE “TERROR.”
  • CHAPTER XXII.
    • FRANKLIN’S LAST VOYAGE.
  • CHAPTER XXIII.
    • THE FRANKLIN SEARCH.
  • CHAPTER XXIV.
    • THE LAST TRACES.
  • CHAPTER XXV.
    • KANE’S MEMORABLE EXPEDITION.
  • CHAPTER XXVI.
  • CHAPTER XXVII.
  • CHAPTER XXVIII.
    • HAYES’ EXPEDITION—SWEDISH EXPEDITIONS.
  • CHAPTER XXIX.
    • THE SECOND GERMAN EXPEDITION.
  • CHAPTER XXX.
    • ON AN ICE-RAFT.
  • CHAPTER XXXI.
    • HALL’S EXPEDITION—THE AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN EXPEDITION—NORDENSKJÖLD.
  • CHAPTER XXXII.
    • THE ANTARCTIC REGIONS.
  • CHAPTER XXXIII.
    • DECISIVE VOYAGES IN HISTORY.—DIAZ—COLUMBUS.
  • CHAPTER XXXIV.
    • DECISIVE VOYAGES IN HISTORY.—COLUMBUS. VASCO DA GAMA.
  • CHAPTER XXXV.
    • THE COMPANIONS AND FOLLOWERS OF COLUMBUS.
  • CHAPTER XXXVI.
    • END OF VOLUME III.
  • FOOTNOTES
  • TRANSCRIBER’S NOTE
    • CREDITS
      • A WORD FROM PROJECT GUTENBERG
      • THE FULL PROJECT GUTENBERG LICENSE
        • Section 1.
        • 1.A.
        • 1.B.
        • 1.C.
        • 1.D.
        • 1.E.
        • 1.E.1.
        • 1.E.2.
        • 1.E.3.
        • 1.E.4.
        • 1.E.5.
        • 1.E.6.
        • 1.E.7.
        • 1.E.8.
        • 1.E.9.
        • 1.F.
        • 1.F.1.
        • 1.F.2.
        • 1.F.3.
        • 1.F.4.
        • 1.F.5.
        • 1.F.6.
        • Section 2.
        • Section 3.
        • Section 4.
        • Section 5.
      • Section 1.
      • 1.A.
      • 1.B.
      • 1.C.
      • 1.D.
      • 1.E.
      • 1.E.1.
      • 1.E.2.
      • 1.E.3.
      • 1.E.4.
      • 1.E.5.
      • 1.E.6.
      • 1.E.7.
      • 1.E.8.
      • 1.E.9.
      • 1.F.
      • 1.F.1.
      • 1.F.2.
      • 1.F.3.
      • 1.F.4.
      • 1.F.5.
      • 1.F.6.
      • Section 2.
      • Section 3.
      • Section 4.
      • Section 5.
    • A WORD FROM PROJECT GUTENBERG
    • THE FULL PROJECT GUTENBERG LICENSE
      • Section 1.
      • 1.A.
      • 1.B.
      • 1.C.
      • 1.D.
      • 1.E.
      • 1.E.1.
      • 1.E.2.
      • 1.E.3.
      • 1.E.4.
      • 1.E.5.
      • 1.E.6.
      • 1.E.7.
      • 1.E.8.
      • 1.E.9.
      • 1.F.
      • 1.F.1.
      • 1.F.2.
      • 1.F.3.
      • 1.F.4.
      • 1.F.5.
      • 1.F.6.
      • Section 2.
      • Section 3.
      • Section 4.
      • Section 5.
    • Section 1.
    • 1.A.
    • 1.B.
    • 1.C.
    • 1.D.
    • 1.E.
    • 1.E.1.
    • 1.E.2.
    • 1.E.3.
    • 1.E.4.
    • 1.E.5.
    • 1.E.6.
    • 1.E.7.
    • 1.E.8.
    • 1.E.9.
    • 1.F.
    • 1.F.1.
    • 1.F.2.
    • 1.F.3.
    • 1.F.4.
    • 1.F.5.
    • 1.F.6.
    • Section 2.
    • Section 3.
    • Section 4.
    • Section 5.
  • ***FINIS***
    No review for this book yet, be the first to review.
      No comment for this book yet, be the first to comment
      You May Also Like
      Also Available On
      App store smallGoogle play small
      Categories
      Curated Lists
      • Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning (Information Science and Statistics)
        by Christopher M. Bishop
        Data mining
        by I. H. Witten
        The Elements of Statistical Learning: Data Mining, Inference, and Prediction
        by Various
        See more...
      • CK-12 Chemistry
        by Various
        Concept Development Studies in Chemistry
        by John Hutchinson
        An Introduction to Chemistry - Atoms First
        by Mark Bishop
        See more...
      • Microsoft Word - How to Use Advanced Algebra II.doc
        by Jonathan Emmons
        Advanced Algebra II: Activities and Homework
        by Kenny Felder
        de2de
        by
        See more...
      • The Sun Who Lost His Way
        by
        Tania is a Detective
        by Kanika G
        Firenze_s-Light
        by
        See more...
      • Java 3D Programming
        by Daniel Selman
        The Java EE 6 Tutorial
        by Oracle Corporation
        JavaKid811
        by
        See more...