History in the Making: A History of the People of the United States of America to 1877
Free

History in the Making: A History of the People of the United States of America to 1877

By Catherine Locks, Sarah Mergel, Pamela Roseman, and Tamara Spike
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • University of North Georgia
  • Nighthawks Open Institutional Repository
    • 8-19-2013
  • History in the Making: A History of the People of the United States of America to 1877
    • Catherine Locks
    • Sarah Mergel
    • Pamela Roseman
    • Tamara Spike
      • Recommended Citation
  • History In The Making
    • Chapter One: United States History Before Columbus
      • 1.1 Introduction
        • 1.1.2 Learning Outcomes
      • 1.2 Origins
        • 1.2.1 Origin Stories
        • 1.2.2 Scientific Theories Of Origin
        • 1.2.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 1.3 The Paleo-Indian Era through the Agricultural Revolution
        • 1.3.1 The Archaic and Woodland Periods
        • 1.3.2 Early Agriculturalists in the Southeast and Southwest: The Mississippian and the Anasazi
        • 1.3.3 The Anasazi
        • 1.3.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 1.4 The Pre-Contact Era (1000-1492 CE)
        • 1.4.1 The West Coast: The Pacific Northwest and California
        • 1.4.2 The Plains
        • 1.4.3 The Northeast
        • 1.4.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 1.5 Conclusion
      • 1.6 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 1.7 Key Terms
      • 1.8 Chronology
      • 1.9 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter One: United States History Before Columbus
    • Chapter Two: The Global Context: Asia, Europe, and Africa in the Early Modern Era
      • 2.1 Introduction
        • 2.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 2.2 Europe in the Age of Discovery: Portugal and Spain
        • 2.2.1 Portugal Initiates the Age of Discovery
        • 2.2.2 The Spanish in the Age of Discovery
        • 2.2.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 2.3 Asia in the Age of Discovery: Chinese Expansion During the Ming Dynasty
        • 2.3.1 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 2.4 Europe in the Age of Discovery: England and France
        • 2.4.1 England and France at War
        • 2.4.2 Religion and Politics in the Sixteenth Century
        • 2.4.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 2.5 Africa at the Outset of the Age of Discovery and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
        • 2.5.1 Medieval West Africa: The Kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, and Songhay
        • 2.5.2 East and South Africa
        • 2.5.3 The Transatlantic Slave Trade
        • 2.5.4 The Kingdom of Dahomey
        • 2.5.5 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 2.6 Conclusion
      • 2.7 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 2.8 Key Terms
      • 2.9 Chronology
      • 2.10 Bibliography
      • 2.11 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Two: The Global Context: Asia, Europe, and Africa in the Early Modern Era
    • Chapter Three: Initial Contact and Conquest
      • 3.1 Introduction
        • 3.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 3.2 The Impact of “Discovery”: The Columbian Exchange
        • 3.2.1 From the New World to the Old: The Exchange of Crops
          • The Exchange of Diseases
          • The Exchange of Animals
        • 3.2.2 From the Columbian Exchange to Transculturation
        • 3.2.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 3.3 The Iberian Countries in the New World
        • 3.3.1 Early Relations in the Caribbean, Mesoamerica, and Peru
          • Cortés Conquers the Aztec Empire
          • The Spanish and the Incas of Peru
          • Francisco Pizarro Conquers the Inca Empire
          • The Portuguese in Brazil
        • 3.3.2 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 3.4 Control: The Iberian Nations Manage Their New World Territories
        • 3.4.1 The Portuguese Settlements
        • 3.4.2 The Indians in the Iberian Colonies
        • 3.4.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 3.5 Alternate Models of Control: The French and Dutch in the Americas
        • 3.5.1 The French in the Americas: Canada and Florida
          • The French Struggle to Control Florida
          • Back to Canada—Control and the Fur Trade
        • 3.5.2 The Dutch in the Americas
        • 3.5.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 3.6 Conclusion
      • 3.7 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 3.8 Key Terms
      • 3.9 Chronology
      • 3.10 Bibliography
      • 3.11 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Three: Initial Contact and Conquest
    • Chapter Four: The Establishment Of English Colonies Before 1642 And Their Development Through The Late Seventeenth Century
      • 4.1 Introduction
        • 4.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 4.2 The English Background
        • 4.2.1 The Stuarts of Scotland and England: James I and Charles I
          • The Long Parliament, the English Civil War, and the Republic
      • 4.3 Roanoke, Raleigh’s Lost Colony
        • 4.3.1 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 4.4 Jamestown
        • 4.4.1 The Powhatan
        • 4.4.2 Captain John Smith
          • The Famous Rescue of Smith by Pocahontas
        • 4.4.3 All That Glitters
        • 4.4.4 John Ratcliffe’s Bad Decisions
        • 4.4.5 Farewell John Smith
        • 4.4.6 The Starving Time
        • 4.4.7 Bermuda and the Lost Ship, the Sea Venture
        • 4.4.8 Governors Gates and West
        • 4.4.9 House of Burgesses
        • 4.4.10 Servitude in Virginia
        • 4.4.11 Opechancanough
        • 4.4.12 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 4.5 The Chesapeake Colonies: Maryland
        • 4.5.1 Maryland and the Civil War in England, 1642-1660
        • 4.5.2 Slavery in Maryland
        • 4.5.3 Maryland in the late Seventeenth Century
        • 4.5.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 4.6 The Establishment of the New England Colonies
        • 4.6.1 Puritans and Puritanism
        • 4.6.2 Plymouth Plantation
          • The Voyage of the Mayflower
          • The Mayflower Compact
          • The Pilgrims, the Indians, and the First Thanksgiving
          • Government in Plymouth
        • 4.6.3 Massachusetts Bay
          • Governing the Colony
          • Puritan Orthodoxy: The Bible Commonwealth
          • Congregational Churches of Visible Saints
        • 4.6.4 Life in Puritan New England
          • Education
          • Doing God’s Work: The Importance of the “Calling”
        • 4.6.5 Offshoots of the Bay Colony: Connecticut, New Haven, and Rhode Island
        • 4.6.6 New Hampshire
        • 4.6.7 Slavery in New England
        • 4.6.8 The New England Confederation, 1643
        • 4.6.9 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 4.7 The Puritans and the Indians
        • 4.7.1 Puritan Mission and the Indians
        • 4.7.2 The Pequot War, 1636-1638
          • John Eliot, Disciple to the Indians
      • 4.8 New England in the Late Seventeenth Century: Declension, Witchcraft, and the Dominion of New England
        • 4.8.1 The Dominion of New England
        • 4.8.2 Witchcraft in Salem
        • 4.8.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 4.9 Conclusion
      • 4.10 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 4.11 Key Terms
      • 4.12 Chronology
      • 4.13 Bibliography
    • Chapter Five: English Colonization After 1660
      • 5.1 Introduction
        • 5.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 5.2 The English Background, 1660-1715
        • 5.2.1 The Reign of Charles II
        • 5.2.2 James II and the Glorious Revolution
        • 5.2.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 5.3 The Carolinas
        • 5.3.1 Carolina: The Proprietary Colony of the South
        • 5.3.2 The Lords Proprietors
        • 5.3.3 The First Colonists at Charles Town
        • 5.3.4 Cash Crops
        • 5.3.5 The Arrival of the Huguenots
        • 5.3.6 Carolina Splits into Two Royal Colonies
        • 5.3.7 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 5.4 The Middle Colonies
        • 5.4.1 The Dutch in the New World
        • 5.4.2 The English Take Over
          • English Rule in New York
          • Indian Relations in New York
          • The Founding of New Jersey
        • 5.4.3 The Quakers in America
          • The Founding of Pennsylvania
          • Settling and Governing the Quaker Colony
          • Indian Relations in Pennsylvania
          • The Founding of Delaware
        • 5.4.4 Life in the Middle Colonies
          • Population and Economic Growth
          • Labor Patterns
          • The Best Poor Man’s Country
        • 5.4.5 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 5.5 Georgia: The Final Colony
        • 5.5.1 Trustee Georgia
        • 5.5.2 Life in the Colony
        • 5.5.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 5.6 Conclusion
      • 5.7 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 5.8 Key Terms
      • 5.9 Chronology
      • 5.10 Bibliography
      • 5.11 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Five: English Colonization After 1660
    • Chapter Six: Growing Pains in the Colonies
      • 6.1 Introduction
        • 6.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 6.2 Colonial Administration
        • 6.2.1 Developing a Commercial Empire
          • The Mercantilist System
          • Extending Imperial Control
          • Trade and the Consumer Culture
        • 6.2.2 Developing a Political System
          • Colonial Administration
          • Colonial Governments
          • Colonial Politics
        • 6.2.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 6.3 The Enlightenment and the Great Awakening
        • 6.3.1 The Enlightenment
        • 6.3.2 The Enlightenment in America
        • 6.3.3 The Great Awakening
          • The Church of England—The Anglican Church
          • The Wesley Brothers and Their Conversion
          • George Whitefield, a Powerful Voice in New England and the Colonies
        • 6.3.4 The Great Awakening Begins in the Middle Colonies
          • Jonathan Edwards
        • 6.3.5 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 6.4 Colonial Conflicts and Wars
        • 6.4.1 Metacom’s War
        • 6.4.2 Bacon’s Rebellion
        • 6.4.3 The Colonial Wars
          • King William’s War (1688-1697)
          • Queen Anne’s War (1702-1713)
          • King George’s War (1744-1748)
        • 6.4.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 6.5 Conclusion
      • 6.6 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 6.7 Key Terms
      • 6.8 Chronology
      • 6.9 Bibliography
      • 6.10 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Six: Growing Pains in the Colonies
    • Chapter Seven: The Road To Revolution, 1754-1775
      • 7.1 Introduction
        • 7.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 7.2 The French and Indian War (1754-63)
        • 7.2.1 Pontiac’s War (1763-64)
        • 7.2.2 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 7.3 The End of the Seven Years War and Worsening Relations, 1763-1772
        • 7.3.1 The French and Indian War and the End of Salutary Neglect
        • 7.3.2 The Proclamation of 1763
        • 7.3.3 The Implications of the New British Approach: The Parliamentary Acts of 1764
        • 7.3.4 The Stamp Act of 1765
          • The Stamp Act Riots and Congress
          • The Colonies Apply Economic Pressure
        • 7.3.5 The Townshend Duties: External Taxes to Regulate Trade
        • 7.3.6 Trouble Continues to Brew: The Boston Massacre
        • 7.3.7 The Evolution of a Formal Theory of Revolt
        • 7.3.8 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 7.4 The Downward Slide to Revolution, 1772-1775
        • 7.4.1 The Tea Act and Party of 1773
        • 7.4.2 The First Continental Congress, 1774
        • 7.4.3 Lexington and Concord, April 19, 1775
        • 7.4.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 7.5 Conclusion
      • 7.6 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 7.7 Key Terms
      • 7.8 Chronology
      • 7.9 Bibliography
      • 7.10 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Seven: The Road to Revolution, 1754-1775
    • Chapter Eight: The American Revolution
      • 8.1 Introduction
        • 8.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 8.2 The Second Continental Congress, 1775-1781
        • 8.2.1 Movement toward Independence, 1775-1776
        • 8.2.2 The Declaration of Independence
        • 8.2.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 8.3 Revolutionary War Battles
        • 8.3.1 Bunker Hill, June 16, 1775
        • 8.3.2 Quebec, December 31, 1775
        • 8.3.3 Long Island, also known as Brooklyn Heights, August 27, 1776
        • 8.3.4 Battle of Trenton, December 26, 1776
        • 8.3.5 Battle of Saratoga, NY, September 19-October 17, 1777
        • 8.3.6 Siege of Charleston, March 29-May 12, 1780
        • 8.3.7 Cowpens, January 17, 1781
        • 8.3.8 Yorktown, September 28-October 19, 1781
        • 8.3.9 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 8.4 The Impact of War
        • 8.4.1 The Cost of Supporting the Patriot Cause
        • 8.4.2 The Struggle of the Loyalists
        • 8.4.3 The Role of Women
        • 8.4.4 The Future of Slavery
        • 8.4.5 Indians and the American Revolution
        • 8.4.6 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 8.5 The Treaty of Paris, 1783
        • 8.5.1 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 8.6 Conclusion
      • 8.7 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 8.8 Key Terms
      • 8.9 Chronology
      • 8.10 Bibliography
      • 8.11 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Eight: The American Revolution
    • Chapter Nine: Articles of Confederation and the Constitution
      • 9.1 Introduction
        • 9.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 9.2 The State Governments
        • 9.2.1 The Need for New Constitutions
        • 9.2.2 Political Thought Shaping the State Constitutions
          • The Structure of Government
          • The Role of the Governor
          • The Nature of Representation in the Legislatures
        • 9.2.3 Divisions on the Road to Republican Government
          • Pennsylvania
          • Massachusetts
          • New Jersey
        • 9.2.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 9.3 The Articles of Confederation Government
        • 9.3.1 The “Critical Period”
        • 9.3.2 Shays’s Rebellion
        • 9.3.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 9.4 The Need for a Stronger Government: Creating the U.S. Constitution: Annapolis and Philadelphia
        • 9.4.1 Debating the Plans for Government
        • 9.4.2 The Nature of the Government
        • 9.4.3 The U.S. Constitution Explained: An Annotation of Key Clauses
        • 9.4.4 Ratification: The Constitution Debated in the States
          • Federalists and Antifederalists
        • 9.4.5 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 9.5 Conclusion
      • 9.6 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 9.7 Key Terms
      • 9.8 Chronology
      • 9.9 Bibliography
      • 9.10 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Nine: Articles of Confederation and the Constitution
    • Chapter Ten: The Federalist Era
      • 10.1 Introduction
        • 10.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 10.2 The Washington Years: Implementing a “More Perfect Union”
        • 10.2.1 Beginning the New Government
          • The Naming Controversy
          • The Bill of Rights
          • Defining the Role of the President
        • 10.2.2 The Road to Economic Recovery and Growth
          • Dealing with the Debt
          • Promoting Economic Development
        • 10.2.3 Foreign Policy Challenges
          • Disputes with the Indians
          • Disputes with Great Britain and Spain
        • 10.2.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 10.3 The Emergence of Partisan Politics
        • 10.3.1 The Federalists and the Republicans
        • 10.3.2 The French Revolution
        • 10.3.3 The Whiskey Rebellion
        • 10.3.4 The Election of 1796
        • 10.3.5 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 10.4 The Adams Years: Federalists Under Fire
        • 10.4.1 Adams, Jefferson, and Political Partisanship
        • 10.4.2 The Quasi-War with France
        • 10.4.3 Domestic Turmoil
          • The Alien Act
          • The Sedition Act
        • 10.4.4 The Election of 1800
        • 10.4.5 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 10.5 Conclusion
      • 10.6 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 10.7 Key Terms
      • 10.8 Chronology
      • 10.9 Bibliography
      • 10.10 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Ten: The Federalist Era
    • Chapter Eleven: The Early Republic
      • 11.1 Introduction
        • 11.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 11.2 Jefferson
        • 11.2.1 Jefferson’s Values
        • 11.2.2 Forging a New Indian Policy
        • 11.2.3 The Louisiana Purchase
        • 11.2.4 The Lewis and Clark Expedition
        • 11.2.5 Judicial Issues
        • 11.2.6 Jefferson’s Second Term
        • 11.2.7 Foreign Pressures
        • 11.2.8 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 11.3 Madison
        • 11.3.1 The War of 1812
          • The War in the North
          • The United States Navy
          • The Land War Moves South
          • The End of the War
        • 11.3.2 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 11.4 Economic and Social Changes
        • 11.4.1 Market Revolution
        • 11.4.2 Cotton Revolution
        • 11.4.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 11.5 Conclusion
      • 11.6 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 11.7 Key Terms
      • 11.8 Chronology
      • 11.9 Bibliography
      • 11.10 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Eleven: The Early Republic
    • Chapter Twelve: Jacksonian America (1815-1840)
      • 12.1 Introduction
        • Learning Outcomes
      • 12.2 The Era of Good Feelings
        • 12.2.1 Promoting a Nationalist Vision
          • Congressional Nationalism
          • Judicial Nationalism
          • Diplomatic Nationalism
        • 12.2.2 The Retreat from Nationalist Tendencies
          • Panic of 1819
          • Missouri Compromise
          • The Corrupt Bargain
        • 12.2.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 12.3 The Age of the Common Man
        • 12.3.1 The Emergence of Jacksonian Democracy
        • 12.3.2 Jackson in Office
        • 12.3.3 Indian Removal
          • Removal in the South
          • Aftermath of Indian Removal
        • 12.3.4 The Nullification Crisis
        • 12.3.5 The Bank War
        • 12.3.6 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 12.4 The Second Party System
        • 12.4.1 Democrats and Whigs
        • 12.4.2 The Trials of Martin Van Buren
        • 12.4.3 The Whigs Triumphant
        • 12.4.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 12.5 Conclusion
      • 12.6 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 12.7 Key Terms
      • 12.8 Chronology
      • 12.9 Bibliography
      • 12.10 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Twelve: Jacksonian America (1815-1840)
    • Chapter Thirteen: Antebellum Revival And Reform
      • 13.1 Introduction
        • 13.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 13.2 Religious Reforms in the Antebellum United States
        • 13.2.1 The Second Great Awakening
          • The Second Great Awakening in the South and in Appalachia
          • The Second Great Awakening in the North
          • The Mormons
          • The Unitarian Movement
        • 13.2.2 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 13.3 Cultural Movements: Transcendentalism, Utopian Communities, and the Cult of Domesticity
        • 13.3.1 Transcendentalism
        • 13.3.2 Utopian Communities
        • 13.3.3 The Cult of Domesticity and Separate Spheres
        • 13.3.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 13.4 American Antebellum Reform
        • 13.4.1 The Temperance Movement
        • 13.4.2 Reform of Prisons, Asylums, and Schools
        • 13.4.3 Abolitionism and the Women’s Rights Movements
          • The Women’s Rights Movement
        • 13.4.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 13.5 Conclusion
      • 13.6 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 13.7 Key Terms
      • 13.8 Chronology
      • 13.9 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Thirteen: Antebellum Revival and Reform
    • Chapter Fourteen: Westward Expansion
      • 14.1 Introduction
        • 14.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 14.2 Westward Expansion and Manifest Destiny
        • 14.2.1 Texas
          • The Texas Revolution and the Lone Star Republic
        • 14.2.2 Oregon
        • 14.2.3 The Election of 1844
        • 14.2.4 The Mormon Trek
        • 14.2.5 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 14.3 The Mexican-American War
        • 14.3.1 The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Aftermath of the War
          • Technological Development and Manifest Destiny
        • 14.3.2 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 14.4 Conclusion
      • 14.5 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 14.6 Key Terms
      • 14.7 Chronology
      • 14.8 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Fourteen: Westward Expansion
    • Chapter Fifteen: The Impending Crisis
      • 15.1 Introduction
        • 15.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 15.2 The Sectional Balance Begins to Unravel
        • 15.2.1 Slavery in the Territories
          • The Wilmot Proviso
          • The Election of 1848
          • The Question of California
        • 15.2.2 The Compromise of 1850
          • The Road to the Compromise
          • The Impact of the Compromise
        • 15.2.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 15.3 The Collapse of the Second Party System
        • 15.3.1 The Possible Expansion of Slavery
          • Young America and Cuba
          • The Kansas-Nebraska Act
        • 15.3.2 The Emergence of New Parties
          • The Know-Nothing Party
          • The Republican Party
        • 15.3.3 The Tremors of 1856
          • Bleeding Kansas
          • Bleeding Sumner
          • The Election of 1856
        • 15.3.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 15.4 The Sectional Balance Comes Undone
        • 15.4.1 Northern and Southern Perspectives
          • The Northern Perspective
          • The Southern Perspective
          • The Panic of 1857
        • 15.4.2 The Crisis Continues
          • The Dred Scott Decision
          • Kansas Again…
          • The Lincoln-Douglas Debates
        • 15.4.3 The Road to Secession
          • John Brown’s Raid on Harper’s Ferry
          • The Election of 1860
          • The Secession Crisis
        • 15.4.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 15.5 Conclusion
      • 15.6 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 15.7 Key Terms
      • 15.8 Chronology
      • 15.9 Bibliography
      • 15.10 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Fifteen: The Impending Crisis (1848-1861)
    • Chapter Sixteen: The Civil War
      • 16.1 Introduction
        • 16.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 16.2 The Road to War
        • 16.2.1 From Secession to War
          • The Confederacy Takes Shape
          • Lincoln Takes Over
        • 16.2.2 Choosing Sides: The Dilemma of the Slave States
        • 16.2.3 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 16.3 The Military Conflict
        • 16.3.1 First Manassas or First Battle of Bull Run
        • 16.3.2 Shiloh
        • 16.3.3 Seven Days
        • 16.3.4 Antietam
        • 16.3.5 Vicksburg
        • 16.3.6 Gettysburg
        • 16.3.7 Chattanooga
        • 16.3.8 Atlanta Campaign
        • 16.3.9 Sherman’s March to the Sea
        • 16.3.10 The End of the War
        • 16.3.11 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 16.4 Wartime Politics
        • 16.4.1 Politics in the Union States
          • Civil Liberties Curtailed
          • Opposition from the Peace Democrats
          • The Election of 1864
        • 16.4.2 Politics in the Confederate States
        • 16.4.3 The Problems of Financing the War
          • Southern Experiments in Financing
          • Northern Experiments in Financing
        • 16.4.4 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 16.5 Social Developments
        • 16.5.1 Wartime Economic Problems
        • 16.5.2 Conscription during the Civil War
        • 16.5.3 Protests and Rioting in New York
        • 16.5.4 Bread Riots in the Confederacy
          • Early Bread Riots
          • The Richmond Bread Riot
          • More Bread Riots
        • 16.5.5 The Emancipation Proclamation
        • 16.5.6 Black Americans and the War
          • Blacks in the Military
          • Violence against Blacks in the North and South
        • 16.5.7 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 16.6 Conclusion
      • 16.7 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 16.8 Key Terms
      • 16.9 Chronology
      • 16.10 Bibliography
      • 16.11 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Sixteen: The Civil War
    • Chapter Seventeen: Reconstruction
      • 17.1 Introduction
        • 17.1.1 Learning Outcomes
      • 17.2 Wartime Reconstruction
        • 17.2.2 Lincoln and Restoration
        • 17.2.3 Emancipation in the Border States
        • 17.2.4 Reconstruction in Union-Occupied Territory
        • 17.2.5 The Possibility of Land Redistribution
        • 17.2.6 Congress and Reconstruction
        • 17.2.7 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 17.3 Reconstruction after the Assassination of Lincoln
        • 17.3.1 Andrew Johnson Undertakes Reconstruction, 1865
        • 17.3.2 The South Reacts
        • 17.3.3 The Issue of Equality
        • 17.3.4 Congress Intervenes, 1865-1866
          • Race Riots in the South
          • The Radical Cause Strengthens
          • Radical Reconstruction
        • 17.3.5 A Constitutional Imbalance: The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson
        • 17.3.6 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 17.4 The Reconstruction Experience
        • 17.4.1 The Shared Experience
        • 17.4.2 Forty Acres and a Mule!
        • 17.4.3 Interracial Relationships
        • 17.4.4 Social Violence
        • 17.4.5 Black Politics
        • 17.4.6 The Legacy of Reconstruction
        • 17.4.7 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 17.5 Retreat from Reconstruction: The Grant Years
        • 17.5.1 Grant Comes to Power
        • 17.5.2 Problems in the First Term
          • Restoring the Unreconstructed States
          • Dealing with Klan Violence
          • Growing Criticism from the Liberal Republicans
          • Winning Re-Election in 1872
        • 17.5.3 Problems in the Second Term
          • Coping with the Panic of 1873
          • Facing the Scandals
          • Revisiting Reconstruction
        • 17.5.4 The South Redeemed
        • 17.5.5 Before You Move On...
          • Key Concepts
          • Test Yourself
      • 17.6 Conclusion
      • 17.7 Critical Thinking Exercises
      • 17.8 Key Terms
      • 17.9 Chronology
      • 17.10 Bibliography
      • 17.11 End Notes
      • Answer Key for Chapter Seventeen: Reconstruction
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