The World's Greatest Books — Vol XX — Miscellaneous Literature and Index
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The World's Greatest Books — Vol XX — Miscellaneous Literature and Index

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Table of Contents
  • THE WORLD'S GREATEST BOOKS
  • Table of Contents
  • Miscellaneous
  • JOSEPH ADDISON
    • The Spectator
      • The Essays and the Essayist
    • The Essays and the Essayist
  • ÆSOP
    • Fables
      • Introductory
      • The Dog and the Shadow
      • The Dying Lion
      • The Mountain in Labour
      • Hercules and the Waggoner
      • The Frogs that Asked for a King
      • The Gnat and the Lion
      • The Wolf and the Stork
      • The Frog who Wanted to Be as Big as an Ox
      • The Dog in the Manger
      • The Bundle of Faggots
      • The Fox Without a Tail
      • The Blind Man and the Paralytic
    • Introductory
    • The Dog and the Shadow
    • The Dying Lion
    • The Mountain in Labour
    • Hercules and the Waggoner
    • The Frogs that Asked for a King
    • The Gnat and the Lion
    • The Wolf and the Stork
    • The Frog who Wanted to Be as Big as an Ox
    • The Dog in the Manger
    • The Bundle of Faggots
    • The Fox Without a Tail
    • The Blind Man and the Paralytic
  • MATTHEW ARNOLD
    • Essays in Criticism
      • I.—Creative Power and Critical Power
      • II.—The Literary "Atmosphere"
      • III.—The Virtue of Detachment
      • IV.—Should We Have an Academy?
      • V.—Our Loss Through Provinciality
      • VI.—Some Illustrative Criticisms
    • I.—Creative Power and Critical Power
    • II.—The Literary "Atmosphere"
    • III.—The Virtue of Detachment
    • IV.—Should We Have an Academy?
    • V.—Our Loss Through Provinciality
    • VI.—Some Illustrative Criticisms
  • GEORGE BRANDES
    • Main Currents of the Literature of the Nineteenth Century
      • The Man and the Book
      • I.—The Emigrant Literature
      • II.—The Romantic School in Germany
      • III.—The Reaction in France
      • IV.—Naturalism in England
      • V.—The Romantic School in France
      • VI.—Young Germany
    • The Man and the Book
    • I.—The Emigrant Literature
    • II.—The Romantic School in Germany
    • III.—The Reaction in France
    • IV.—Naturalism in England
    • V.—The Romantic School in France
    • VI.—Young Germany
  • ROBERT BURTON
    • The Anatomy of Melancholy
      • I.—Democritus Junior to the Reader
      • II.—The Causes of Melancholy
      • III.—The Cure of Melancholy
      • IV.—Love-Melancholy
    • I.—Democritus Junior to the Reader
    • II.—The Causes of Melancholy
    • III.—The Cure of Melancholy
    • IV.—Love-Melancholy
  • THOMAS CARLYLE
    • On Heroes and Hero-Worship
      • I.—The Hero as Divinity
      • II.—The Hero as Prophet
      • III.—The Hero as Poet
      • IV.—The Hero as Priest
      • V.—The Hero as Man of Letters
      • VI.—The Hero as King
    • I.—The Hero as Divinity
    • II.—The Hero as Prophet
    • III.—The Hero as Poet
    • IV.—The Hero as Priest
    • V.—The Hero as Man of Letters
    • VI.—The Hero as King
    • Sartor Resartus
    • I.—The Philosophy of Clothes
      • II.—Biography of Teufelsdröckh
      • III.—The Volume on Clothes
    • II.—Biography of Teufelsdröckh
    • III.—The Volume on Clothes
  • MARCUS TULLIUS CICERO
    • Concerning Friendship
      • A Dialogue
    • A Dialogue
  • WILLIAM COBBETT
    • Advice to Young Men
      • I.—To a Youth
      • II.—To a Young Man
      • III.—To a Lover
      • IV.—To a Husband
      • V.—To a Father
      • VI.—To the Citizen
    • I.—To a Youth
    • II.—To a Young Man
    • III.—To a Lover
    • IV.—To a Husband
    • V.—To a Father
    • VI.—To the Citizen
  • DANIEL DEFOE
    • A Journal of the Plague Year
      • I.—A Stricken City
      • II.—How the Dead Were Buried
      • III.—Universal Desolation
    • I.—A Stricken City
    • II.—How the Dead Were Buried
    • III.—Universal Desolation
  • DEMOSTHENES
    • The Philippics
      • I.—"Men of Athens, Arouse Yourselves!"
      • II.—Beware the Guile of Philip
      • III.—Athens Must Head the War
      • IV.—Exterminate the Traitors!
    • I.—"Men of Athens, Arouse Yourselves!"
    • II.—Beware the Guile of Philip
    • III.—Athens Must Head the War
    • IV.—Exterminate the Traitors!
  • RALPH WALDO EMERSON
    • English Traits
      • I.—The Anchorage of Britain
      • II.—Racial Characteristics
      • III.—Wealth, Aristocracy, and Religion
    • I.—The Anchorage of Britain
    • II.—Racial Characteristics
    • III.—Wealth, Aristocracy, and Religion
    • Representative Men
      • Plato
      • Montaigne
      • Shakespeare
      • Napoleon
      • Goethe
    • Plato
    • Montaigne
    • Shakespeare
    • Napoleon
    • Goethe
  • ERASMUS
    • Familiar Colloquies
      • Concerning Men, Manners and Things
    • Concerning Men, Manners and Things
    • In Praise of Folly
      • I.—Stultitia's Declamation
      • II.—The Mockery of Wisdom
      • III.—Classification of Fools
      • IV.—On Princes and Pontiffs
    • I.—Stultitia's Declamation
    • II.—The Mockery of Wisdom
    • III.—Classification of Fools
    • IV.—On Princes and Pontiffs
  • GESTA ROMANORUM
    • A Story-Book of the Middle Ages
      • I.—Of Love
      • II.—Of Fidelity
      • III.—O Venial Sin
      • IV.—Of the End of Sinners
      • V.—Of Too Much Pride
      • VI.—Of Avarice
      • VII.—Of Temporary Tribulation
    • I.—Of Love
    • II.—Of Fidelity
    • III.—O Venial Sin
    • IV.—Of the End of Sinners
    • V.—Of Too Much Pride
    • VI.—Of Avarice
    • VII.—Of Temporary Tribulation
  • OLIVER GOLDSMITH
    • The Citizen of the World
      • The Troubles of the Great FROM LIEN CHI ALTANGI TO FUM HOAM, FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE CEREMONIAL ACADEMY AT PEKIN
      • The Folly of the Recluse FROM LIEN CHI ALTANGI TO HINGPO, HIS SON
      • On Mad Dogs FROM LIEN CHI ALTANGI TO FUM HOAM
      • On Elections FROM LIEN CHI ALTANGI TO FUM HOAM
      • Opinions and Anecdotes
    • The Troubles of the Great FROM LIEN CHI ALTANGI TO FUM HOAM, FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE CEREMONIAL ACADEMY AT PEKIN
    • The Folly of the Recluse FROM LIEN CHI ALTANGI TO HINGPO, HIS SON
    • On Mad Dogs FROM LIEN CHI ALTANGI TO FUM HOAM
    • On Elections FROM LIEN CHI ALTANGI TO FUM HOAM
    • Opinions and Anecdotes
  • HENRY HALLAM
    • Introduction to the Literature of Europe
      • I.—Before the Fifteenth Century
      • II.—The Fifteenth Century
      • III.—The Sixteenth Century (1500–1550)
      • IV.—The Sixteenth Century (1550–1600)
      • V.—The Seventeenth Century (1600–1650)
      • VI.—The Seventeenth Century (1650–1700)
    • I.—Before the Fifteenth Century
    • II.—The Fifteenth Century
    • III.—The Sixteenth Century (1500–1550)
    • IV.—The Sixteenth Century (1550–1600)
    • V.—The Seventeenth Century (1600–1650)
    • VI.—The Seventeenth Century (1650–1700)
  • WILLIAM HAZLITT
    • Lectures on the English Poets
      • What Is Poetry?
      • Chaucer and Spenser
      • Shakespeare and Milton
      • Dryden and Pope
      • Thomson and Cowper
      • Robert Burns
      • Some Contemporary Poets
    • What Is Poetry?
    • Chaucer and Spenser
    • Shakespeare and Milton
    • Dryden and Pope
    • Thomson and Cowper
    • Robert Burns
    • Some Contemporary Poets
  • OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES
    • The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table
      • Every Man His Own Boswell
      • The Ageing of Ideas
      • The Confusion of Personality
      • More on Books
      • Dual Consciousness
      • The Race of Life
      • Sensibility and Scholarship
      • A Growing Romance
      • Nature's Patient Advance
      • The Long Path
    • Every Man His Own Boswell
    • The Ageing of Ideas
    • The Confusion of Personality
    • More on Books
    • Dual Consciousness
    • The Race of Life
    • Sensibility and Scholarship
    • A Growing Romance
    • Nature's Patient Advance
    • The Long Path
  • LA BRUYÈRE
    • Characters
      • I.—On Men and Books
      • II.—On Women and Wealth
      • III.—On Men and Manners
      • IV.—On Customs and Religion
    • I.—On Men and Books
    • II.—On Women and Wealth
    • III.—On Men and Manners
    • IV.—On Customs and Religion
  • WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR
    • Imaginary Conversations
      • I.—Peter the Great and Alexis
      • II.—Joseph Scaliger and Montaigne
      • III.—Bossuet and the Duchesse de Fontanges
      • IV.—The Empress Catharine and Princess Dashkof
      • V.—Bacon and Richard Hooker
    • I.—Peter the Great and Alexis
    • II.—Joseph Scaliger and Montaigne
    • III.—Bossuet and the Duchesse de Fontanges
    • IV.—The Empress Catharine and Princess Dashkof
    • V.—Bacon and Richard Hooker
  • LA ROCHEFOUCAULD
    • Reflections and Moral Maxims
      • I.—Of Love and of Women
      • II.—Friendship
      • III.—Things of the Mind
      • IV.—Human Life and Human Nature
      • V.—Virtues and Vices
    • I.—Of Love and of Women
    • II.—Friendship
    • III.—Things of the Mind
    • IV.—Human Life and Human Nature
    • V.—Virtues and Vices
  • LEONARDO DA VINCI
    • Treatise on Painting
      • From Da Vinci's Notebooks
      • How Sculpture is Less Intellectual
      • Of the Ten Offices of the Eye
      • Rule for Beginners in Painting
      • Precepts for Painting
      • On the Choice of Light
      • Of the Gesture of Figures
      • The Judgment of Painting
      • Do Not Disdain to Work from Nature
      • Of the Painter's Life in His Study
      • Of Ways to Represent Various Scenes
      • To Learn to Work from Memory
      • On Studying in Bed
    • From Da Vinci's Notebooks
    • How Sculpture is Less Intellectual
    • Of the Ten Offices of the Eye
    • Rule for Beginners in Painting
    • Precepts for Painting
    • On the Choice of Light
    • Of the Gesture of Figures
    • The Judgment of Painting
    • Do Not Disdain to Work from Nature
    • Of the Painter's Life in His Study
    • Of Ways to Represent Various Scenes
    • To Learn to Work from Memory
    • On Studying in Bed
  • GOTTHOLD EPHRAIM LESSING
    • Laocoon
      • I.—On the Limits of Painting and Poetry
      • II.—The Poet
      • III.—Beauty and Charm
    • I.—On the Limits of Painting and Poetry
    • II.—The Poet
    • III.—Beauty and Charm
  • JOHN STUART MILL
    • Essay on Liberty
      • I.—Liberty of Thought and Discussion
      • II.—Individuality as One of the Elements of Well-Being
      • III.—The Limits of the Authority of Society Over the Individual
    • I.—Liberty of Thought and Discussion
    • II.—Individuality as One of the Elements of Well-Being
    • III.—The Limits of the Authority of Society Over the Individual
  • JOHN MILTON
    • Areopagitica
      • I.—The Right of Appeal
      • II.—The History of Repression
      • III.—The Futility of Prohibition
      • IV.—An Indignity to Learning
    • I.—The Right of Appeal
    • II.—The History of Repression
    • III.—The Futility of Prohibition
    • IV.—An Indignity to Learning
  • PLUTARCH
    • Parallel Lives
      • I.—Lycurgus and Numa
      • II.—Aristides and Cato
      • III.—Demosthenes and Cicero
    • I.—Lycurgus and Numa
    • II.—Aristides and Cato
    • III.—Demosthenes and Cicero
  • MADAME DE STAËL
    • On Germany
      • I.—Germany, Its People and Customs
      • II.—On Southern Germany and Austria
      • III.—On the German Language
      • IV.—Prussia
    • I.—Germany, Its People and Customs
    • II.—On Southern Germany and Austria
    • III.—On the German Language
    • IV.—Prussia
  • THE "GERMANIA" OF TACITUS
    • Customs and Peoples of Germany
      • I.—Germany and the German Tribes
      • II.—Customs of Government and War
      • III.—Domestic Customs of the Germans
      • IV.—Tribes of the West and North
      • V.—The Great Nation of the Suevi
      • VI.—The Tribes of the Frontier
    • I.—Germany and the German Tribes
    • II.—Customs of Government and War
    • III.—Domestic Customs of the Germans
    • IV.—Tribes of the West and North
    • V.—The Great Nation of the Suevi
    • VI.—The Tribes of the Frontier
  • HIPPOLYTE ADOLPHE TAINE
    • History of English Literature
      • Saxon and Norman
      • Chaucer
      • The Renaissance
      • Spenser
      • The Theatre
      • Shakespeare
      • The Christian Renaissance
      • Milton
      • The Modern Spirit
    • Saxon and Norman
    • Chaucer
    • The Renaissance
    • Spenser
    • The Theatre
    • Shakespeare
    • The Christian Renaissance
    • Milton
    • The Modern Spirit
  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU
    • "Walden"
      • The Simple Life
      • Ideals
      • House Building
      • Farming
      • Earning a Living
      • The Life with Nature
      • Reading
      • In the Sun
      • Night Sounds
      • Visitors
      • Interference
      • Exhausted Experience
    • The Simple Life
    • Ideals
    • House Building
    • Farming
    • Earning a Living
    • The Life with Nature
    • Reading
    • In the Sun
    • Night Sounds
    • Visitors
    • Interference
    • Exhausted Experience
  • ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLE
    • Democracy in America
      • I.—Equality
      • II.—Religion and Liberty
      • III.—Omnipotence of the Majority
      • IV.—Equality of Men and Women
      • V.—The Perfectibility of Man
      • VI.—American Vanity
    • I.—Equality
    • II.—Religion and Liberty
    • III.—Omnipotence of the Majority
    • IV.—Equality of Men and Women
    • V.—The Perfectibility of Man
    • VI.—American Vanity
  • IZAAK WALTON
    • The Compleat Angler
      • The Virtues of Angling
      • Master and Pupil
      • Fish of English Streams
      • Walking Homewards
    • The Virtues of Angling
    • Master and Pupil
    • Fish of English Streams
    • Walking Homewards
  • Index
  • Transcriber's Notes
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