The Man Who Laughs A Romance of English History
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The Man Who Laughs A Romance of English History

By Victor Hugo
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  • The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Man Who Laughs, by Victor Hugo
    • E-text prepared by Steven desJardins and Project Gutenberg Distributed Proofreaders
  • The Man Who Laughs
    • A Romance of English History
      • CONTENTS.
        • Preliminary Chapter.—Ursus
        • Another Preliminary Chapter.—The Comprachicos
      • Preliminary Chapter.—Ursus
      • Another Preliminary Chapter.—The Comprachicos
      • PART I.
      • BOOK THE FIRST.—NIGHT NOT SO BLACK AS MAN.
        • I.—Portland Bill
        • II.—Left Alone
        • III.—Alone
        • IV.—Questions
        • V.—The Tree of Human Invention
        • VI.—Struggle between Death and Night
        • VII.—The North Point of Portland
      • I.—Portland Bill
      • II.—Left Alone
      • III.—Alone
      • IV.—Questions
      • V.—The Tree of Human Invention
      • VI.—Struggle between Death and Night
      • VII.—The North Point of Portland
      • BOOK THE SECOND.—THE HOOKER AT SEA.
        • I.—Superhuman Laws
        • II.—Our First Rough Sketches Filled in
        • III.—Troubled Men on the Troubled Sea
        • IV.—A Cloud Different from the Others enters on the Scene
        • V.—Hardquanonne
        • VI.—They Think that Help is at Hand
        • VII.—Superhuman Horrors
        • VIII.—Nix et Nox
        • IX.—The Charge Confided to a Raging Sea
        • X.—The Colossal Savage, the Storm
        • XI.—The Caskets
        • XII.—Face to Face with the Rock
        • XIII.—Face to Face with Night
        • XIV.—Ortach
        • XV.—Portentosum Mare
        • XVI.—The Problem Suddenly Works in Silence
        • XVII.—The Last Resource
        • XVIII.—The Highest Resource
      • I.—Superhuman Laws
      • II.—Our First Rough Sketches Filled in
      • III.—Troubled Men on the Troubled Sea
      • IV.—A Cloud Different from the Others enters on the Scene
      • V.—Hardquanonne
      • VI.—They Think that Help is at Hand
      • VII.—Superhuman Horrors
      • VIII.—Nix et Nox
      • IX.—The Charge Confided to a Raging Sea
      • X.—The Colossal Savage, the Storm
      • XI.—The Caskets
      • XII.—Face to Face with the Rock
      • XIII.—Face to Face with Night
      • XIV.—Ortach
      • XV.—Portentosum Mare
      • XVI.—The Problem Suddenly Works in Silence
      • XVII.—The Last Resource
      • XVIII.—The Highest Resource
      • BOOK THE THIRD.—THE CHILD IN THE SHADOW.
        • I.—Chesil
        • II.—The Effect of Snow
        • III.—A Burden Makes a Rough Road Rougher
        • IV.—Another Form of Desert
        • V.—Misanthropy Plays Its Pranks
        • VI.—The Awaking
      • I.—Chesil
      • II.—The Effect of Snow
      • III.—A Burden Makes a Rough Road Rougher
      • IV.—Another Form of Desert
      • V.—Misanthropy Plays Its Pranks
      • VI.—The Awaking
      • PART II.
      • BOOK THE FIRST.—THE EVERLASTING PRESENCE OF THE PAST. MAN REFLECTS MAN.
        • I.—Lord Clancharlie
        • II.—Lord David Dirry-Moir
        • III.—The Duchess Josiana
        • IV.—The Leader of Fashion
        • V.—Queen Anne
        • VI.—Barkilphedro
        • VII.—Barkilphedro Gnaws His Way
        • VIII.—Inferi
        • IX.—Hate is as Strong as Love
        • X.—The Flame which would be Seen if Man were Transparent
        • XI.—Barkilphedro in Ambuscade
        • XII.—Scotland, Ireland, and England
      • I.—Lord Clancharlie
      • II.—Lord David Dirry-Moir
      • III.—The Duchess Josiana
      • IV.—The Leader of Fashion
      • V.—Queen Anne
      • VI.—Barkilphedro
      • VII.—Barkilphedro Gnaws His Way
      • VIII.—Inferi
      • IX.—Hate is as Strong as Love
      • X.—The Flame which would be Seen if Man were Transparent
      • XI.—Barkilphedro in Ambuscade
      • XII.—Scotland, Ireland, and England
      • BOOK THE SECOND.—GWYNPLAINE AND DEA.
        • I.—Wherein we see the Face of Him of whom we have hitherto seen only the Acts
        • II.—Dea
        • III.—"Oculos non Habet, et Videt"
        • IV.—Well-matched Lovers
        • V.—The Blue Sky through the Black Cloud
        • VI.—Ursus as Tutor, and Ursus as Guardian
        • VII.—Blindness Gives Lessons in Clairvoyance
        • VIII.—Not only Happiness, but Prosperity
        • IX.—Absurdities which Folks without Taste call Poetry
        • X.—An Outsider's View of Men and Things
        • XI.—Gwynplaine Thinks Justice, and Ursus Talks Truth
        • XII.—Ursus the Poet Drags on Ursus the Philosopher
      • I.—Wherein we see the Face of Him of whom we have hitherto seen only the Acts
      • II.—Dea
      • III.—"Oculos non Habet, et Videt"
      • IV.—Well-matched Lovers
      • V.—The Blue Sky through the Black Cloud
      • VI.—Ursus as Tutor, and Ursus as Guardian
      • VII.—Blindness Gives Lessons in Clairvoyance
      • VIII.—Not only Happiness, but Prosperity
      • IX.—Absurdities which Folks without Taste call Poetry
      • X.—An Outsider's View of Men and Things
      • XI.—Gwynplaine Thinks Justice, and Ursus Talks Truth
      • XII.—Ursus the Poet Drags on Ursus the Philosopher
      • BOOK THE THIRD.—THE BEGINNING OF THE FISSURE.
        • I.—The Tadcaster Inn
        • II.—Open-Air Eloquence
        • III.—Where the Passer-by Reappears
        • IV.—Contraries Fraternize in Hate
        • V.—The Wapentake
        • VI.—The Mouse Examined by the Cats
        • VII.—Why Should a Gold Piece Lower Itself by Mixing with a Heap of Pennies?
        • VIII.—Symptoms of Poisoning
        • IX.—Abyssus Abyssum Vocat
      • I.—The Tadcaster Inn
      • II.—Open-Air Eloquence
      • III.—Where the Passer-by Reappears
      • IV.—Contraries Fraternize in Hate
      • V.—The Wapentake
      • VI.—The Mouse Examined by the Cats
      • VII.—Why Should a Gold Piece Lower Itself by Mixing with a Heap of Pennies?
      • VIII.—Symptoms of Poisoning
      • IX.—Abyssus Abyssum Vocat
      • BOOK THE FOURTH.—THE CELL OF TORTURE.
        • I.—The Temptation of St. Gwynplaine
        • II.—From Gay to Grave
        • III.—Lex, Rex, Fex
        • IV.—Ursus Spies the Police
        • V.—A Fearful Place
        • VI.—The Kind of Magistracy under the Wigs of Former Days
        • VII.—Shuddering
        • VIII.—Lamentation
      • I.—The Temptation of St. Gwynplaine
      • II.—From Gay to Grave
      • III.—Lex, Rex, Fex
      • IV.—Ursus Spies the Police
      • V.—A Fearful Place
      • VI.—The Kind of Magistracy under the Wigs of Former Days
      • VII.—Shuddering
      • VIII.—Lamentation
      • BOOK THE FIFTH.—THE SEA AND FATE ARE MOVED BY THE SAME BREATH.
        • I.—The Durability of Fragile Things
        • II.—The Waif Knows Its Own Course
        • III.—An Awakening
        • IV.—Fascination
        • V.—We Think We Remember; We Forget
      • I.—The Durability of Fragile Things
      • II.—The Waif Knows Its Own Course
      • III.—An Awakening
      • IV.—Fascination
      • V.—We Think We Remember; We Forget
      • BOOK THE SIXTH.—URSUS UNDER DIFFERENT ASPECTS.
        • I.—What the Misanthrope said
        • II.—What He did
        • III.—Complications
        • IV.—Moenibus Surdis Campana Muta
        • V.—State Policy Deals with Little Matters as Well as with Great
      • I.—What the Misanthrope said
      • II.—What He did
      • III.—Complications
      • IV.—Moenibus Surdis Campana Muta
      • V.—State Policy Deals with Little Matters as Well as with Great
      • BOOK THE SEVENTH.—THE TITANESS.
        • I.—The Awakening
        • II.—The Resemblance of a Palace to a Wood
        • III.—Eve
        • IV.—Satan
        • V.—They Recognize, but do not Know, Each Other
      • I.—The Awakening
      • II.—The Resemblance of a Palace to a Wood
      • III.—Eve
      • IV.—Satan
      • V.—They Recognize, but do not Know, Each Other
      • BOOK THE EIGHTH.—THE CAPITOL AND THINGS AROUND IT.
        • I.—Analysis of Majestic Matters
        • II.—Impartiality
        • III.—The Old Hall
        • IV.—The Old Chamber
        • V.—Aristocratic Gossip
        • VI.—The High and the Low
        • VII.—Storms of Men are Worse than Storms of Oceans
        • VIII.—He would be a Good Brother, were he not a Good Son
      • I.—Analysis of Majestic Matters
      • II.—Impartiality
      • III.—The Old Hall
      • IV.—The Old Chamber
      • V.—Aristocratic Gossip
      • VI.—The High and the Low
      • VII.—Storms of Men are Worse than Storms of Oceans
      • VIII.—He would be a Good Brother, were he not a Good Son
      • BOOK THE NINTH.—IN RUINS.
        • I.—It is through Excess of Greatness that Man reaches Excess of Misery
        • II.—The Dregs
      • I.—It is through Excess of Greatness that Man reaches Excess of Misery
      • II.—The Dregs
      • CONCLUSION.—THE NIGHT AND THE SEA.
        • I.—A Watch-dog may be a Guardian Angel
        • II.—Barkilphedro, having aimed at the Eagle, brings down the Dove
        • III.—Paradise Regained Below
        • IV.—Nay; on High!
      • I.—A Watch-dog may be a Guardian Angel
      • II.—Barkilphedro, having aimed at the Eagle, brings down the Dove
      • III.—Paradise Regained Below
      • IV.—Nay; on High!
    • CONTENTS.
      • Preliminary Chapter.—Ursus
      • Another Preliminary Chapter.—The Comprachicos
    • Preliminary Chapter.—Ursus
    • Another Preliminary Chapter.—The Comprachicos
    • PART I.
    • BOOK THE FIRST.—NIGHT NOT SO BLACK AS MAN.
      • I.—Portland Bill
      • II.—Left Alone
      • III.—Alone
      • IV.—Questions
      • V.—The Tree of Human Invention
      • VI.—Struggle between Death and Night
      • VII.—The North Point of Portland
    • I.—Portland Bill
    • II.—Left Alone
    • III.—Alone
    • IV.—Questions
    • V.—The Tree of Human Invention
    • VI.—Struggle between Death and Night
    • VII.—The North Point of Portland
    • BOOK THE SECOND.—THE HOOKER AT SEA.
      • I.—Superhuman Laws
      • II.—Our First Rough Sketches Filled in
      • III.—Troubled Men on the Troubled Sea
      • IV.—A Cloud Different from the Others enters on the Scene
      • V.—Hardquanonne
      • VI.—They Think that Help is at Hand
      • VII.—Superhuman Horrors
      • VIII.—Nix et Nox
      • IX.—The Charge Confided to a Raging Sea
      • X.—The Colossal Savage, the Storm
      • XI.—The Caskets
      • XII.—Face to Face with the Rock
      • XIII.—Face to Face with Night
      • XIV.—Ortach
      • XV.—Portentosum Mare
      • XVI.—The Problem Suddenly Works in Silence
      • XVII.—The Last Resource
      • XVIII.—The Highest Resource
    • I.—Superhuman Laws
    • II.—Our First Rough Sketches Filled in
    • III.—Troubled Men on the Troubled Sea
    • IV.—A Cloud Different from the Others enters on the Scene
    • V.—Hardquanonne
    • VI.—They Think that Help is at Hand
    • VII.—Superhuman Horrors
    • VIII.—Nix et Nox
    • IX.—The Charge Confided to a Raging Sea
    • X.—The Colossal Savage, the Storm
    • XI.—The Caskets
    • XII.—Face to Face with the Rock
    • XIII.—Face to Face with Night
    • XIV.—Ortach
    • XV.—Portentosum Mare
    • XVI.—The Problem Suddenly Works in Silence
    • XVII.—The Last Resource
    • XVIII.—The Highest Resource
    • BOOK THE THIRD.—THE CHILD IN THE SHADOW.
      • I.—Chesil
      • II.—The Effect of Snow
      • III.—A Burden Makes a Rough Road Rougher
      • IV.—Another Form of Desert
      • V.—Misanthropy Plays Its Pranks
      • VI.—The Awaking
    • I.—Chesil
    • II.—The Effect of Snow
    • III.—A Burden Makes a Rough Road Rougher
    • IV.—Another Form of Desert
    • V.—Misanthropy Plays Its Pranks
    • VI.—The Awaking
    • PART II.
    • BOOK THE FIRST.—THE EVERLASTING PRESENCE OF THE PAST. MAN REFLECTS MAN.
      • I.—Lord Clancharlie
      • II.—Lord David Dirry-Moir
      • III.—The Duchess Josiana
      • IV.—The Leader of Fashion
      • V.—Queen Anne
      • VI.—Barkilphedro
      • VII.—Barkilphedro Gnaws His Way
      • VIII.—Inferi
      • IX.—Hate is as Strong as Love
      • X.—The Flame which would be Seen if Man were Transparent
      • XI.—Barkilphedro in Ambuscade
      • XII.—Scotland, Ireland, and England
    • I.—Lord Clancharlie
    • II.—Lord David Dirry-Moir
    • III.—The Duchess Josiana
    • IV.—The Leader of Fashion
    • V.—Queen Anne
    • VI.—Barkilphedro
    • VII.—Barkilphedro Gnaws His Way
    • VIII.—Inferi
    • IX.—Hate is as Strong as Love
    • X.—The Flame which would be Seen if Man were Transparent
    • XI.—Barkilphedro in Ambuscade
    • XII.—Scotland, Ireland, and England
    • BOOK THE SECOND.—GWYNPLAINE AND DEA.
      • I.—Wherein we see the Face of Him of whom we have hitherto seen only the Acts
      • II.—Dea
      • III.—"Oculos non Habet, et Videt"
      • IV.—Well-matched Lovers
      • V.—The Blue Sky through the Black Cloud
      • VI.—Ursus as Tutor, and Ursus as Guardian
      • VII.—Blindness Gives Lessons in Clairvoyance
      • VIII.—Not only Happiness, but Prosperity
      • IX.—Absurdities which Folks without Taste call Poetry
      • X.—An Outsider's View of Men and Things
      • XI.—Gwynplaine Thinks Justice, and Ursus Talks Truth
      • XII.—Ursus the Poet Drags on Ursus the Philosopher
    • I.—Wherein we see the Face of Him of whom we have hitherto seen only the Acts
    • II.—Dea
    • III.—"Oculos non Habet, et Videt"
    • IV.—Well-matched Lovers
    • V.—The Blue Sky through the Black Cloud
    • VI.—Ursus as Tutor, and Ursus as Guardian
    • VII.—Blindness Gives Lessons in Clairvoyance
    • VIII.—Not only Happiness, but Prosperity
    • IX.—Absurdities which Folks without Taste call Poetry
    • X.—An Outsider's View of Men and Things
    • XI.—Gwynplaine Thinks Justice, and Ursus Talks Truth
    • XII.—Ursus the Poet Drags on Ursus the Philosopher
    • BOOK THE THIRD.—THE BEGINNING OF THE FISSURE.
      • I.—The Tadcaster Inn
      • II.—Open-Air Eloquence
      • III.—Where the Passer-by Reappears
      • IV.—Contraries Fraternize in Hate
      • V.—The Wapentake
      • VI.—The Mouse Examined by the Cats
      • VII.—Why Should a Gold Piece Lower Itself by Mixing with a Heap of Pennies?
      • VIII.—Symptoms of Poisoning
      • IX.—Abyssus Abyssum Vocat
    • I.—The Tadcaster Inn
    • II.—Open-Air Eloquence
    • III.—Where the Passer-by Reappears
    • IV.—Contraries Fraternize in Hate
    • V.—The Wapentake
    • VI.—The Mouse Examined by the Cats
    • VII.—Why Should a Gold Piece Lower Itself by Mixing with a Heap of Pennies?
    • VIII.—Symptoms of Poisoning
    • IX.—Abyssus Abyssum Vocat
    • BOOK THE FOURTH.—THE CELL OF TORTURE.
      • I.—The Temptation of St. Gwynplaine
      • II.—From Gay to Grave
      • III.—Lex, Rex, Fex
      • IV.—Ursus Spies the Police
      • V.—A Fearful Place
      • VI.—The Kind of Magistracy under the Wigs of Former Days
      • VII.—Shuddering
      • VIII.—Lamentation
    • I.—The Temptation of St. Gwynplaine
    • II.—From Gay to Grave
    • III.—Lex, Rex, Fex
    • IV.—Ursus Spies the Police
    • V.—A Fearful Place
    • VI.—The Kind of Magistracy under the Wigs of Former Days
    • VII.—Shuddering
    • VIII.—Lamentation
    • BOOK THE FIFTH.—THE SEA AND FATE ARE MOVED BY THE SAME BREATH.
      • I.—The Durability of Fragile Things
      • II.—The Waif Knows Its Own Course
      • III.—An Awakening
      • IV.—Fascination
      • V.—We Think We Remember; We Forget
    • I.—The Durability of Fragile Things
    • II.—The Waif Knows Its Own Course
    • III.—An Awakening
    • IV.—Fascination
    • V.—We Think We Remember; We Forget
    • BOOK THE SIXTH.—URSUS UNDER DIFFERENT ASPECTS.
      • I.—What the Misanthrope said
      • II.—What He did
      • III.—Complications
      • IV.—Moenibus Surdis Campana Muta
      • V.—State Policy Deals with Little Matters as Well as with Great
    • I.—What the Misanthrope said
    • II.—What He did
    • III.—Complications
    • IV.—Moenibus Surdis Campana Muta
    • V.—State Policy Deals with Little Matters as Well as with Great
    • BOOK THE SEVENTH.—THE TITANESS.
      • I.—The Awakening
      • II.—The Resemblance of a Palace to a Wood
      • III.—Eve
      • IV.—Satan
      • V.—They Recognize, but do not Know, Each Other
    • I.—The Awakening
    • II.—The Resemblance of a Palace to a Wood
    • III.—Eve
    • IV.—Satan
    • V.—They Recognize, but do not Know, Each Other
    • BOOK THE EIGHTH.—THE CAPITOL AND THINGS AROUND IT.
      • I.—Analysis of Majestic Matters
      • II.—Impartiality
      • III.—The Old Hall
      • IV.—The Old Chamber
      • V.—Aristocratic Gossip
      • VI.—The High and the Low
      • VII.—Storms of Men are Worse than Storms of Oceans
      • VIII.—He would be a Good Brother, were he not a Good Son
    • I.—Analysis of Majestic Matters
    • II.—Impartiality
    • III.—The Old Hall
    • IV.—The Old Chamber
    • V.—Aristocratic Gossip
    • VI.—The High and the Low
    • VII.—Storms of Men are Worse than Storms of Oceans
    • VIII.—He would be a Good Brother, were he not a Good Son
    • BOOK THE NINTH.—IN RUINS.
      • I.—It is through Excess of Greatness that Man reaches Excess of Misery
      • II.—The Dregs
    • I.—It is through Excess of Greatness that Man reaches Excess of Misery
    • II.—The Dregs
    • CONCLUSION.—THE NIGHT AND THE SEA.
      • I.—A Watch-dog may be a Guardian Angel
      • II.—Barkilphedro, having aimed at the Eagle, brings down the Dove
      • III.—Paradise Regained Below
      • IV.—Nay; on High!
    • I.—A Watch-dog may be a Guardian Angel
    • II.—Barkilphedro, having aimed at the Eagle, brings down the Dove
    • III.—Paradise Regained Below
    • IV.—Nay; on High!
    • THE LAUGHING MAN.
      • A ROMANCE OF ENGLISH HISTORY.
    • A ROMANCE OF ENGLISH HISTORY.
    • PRELIMINARY CHAPTER.
      • URSUS.
      • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
    • URSUS.
    • I.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • ANOTHER PRELIMINARY CHAPTER.
      • THE COMPRACHICOS.
      • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
    • THE COMPRACHICOS.
    • I.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • PART I.
    • BOOK THE FIRST.
      • NIGHT NOT SO BLACK AS MAN.
    • NIGHT NOT SO BLACK AS MAN.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • PORTLAND BILL.
    • PORTLAND BILL.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • LEFT ALONE.
    • LEFT ALONE.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • ALONE.
    • ALONE.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • QUESTIONS.
    • QUESTIONS.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • THE TREE OF HUMAN INVENTION.
    • THE TREE OF HUMAN INVENTION.
    • CHAPTER VI.
      • STRUGGLE BETWEEN DEATH AND LIFE.
    • STRUGGLE BETWEEN DEATH AND LIFE.
    • CHAPTER VII.
      • THE NORTH POINT OF PORTLAND.
    • THE NORTH POINT OF PORTLAND.
    • BOOK THE SECOND.
      • THE HOOKER AT SEA.
    • THE HOOKER AT SEA.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • SUPERHUMAN LAWS.
    • SUPERHUMAN LAWS.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • OUR FIRST ROUGH SKETCHES FILLED IN.
    • OUR FIRST ROUGH SKETCHES FILLED IN.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • TROUBLED MEN ON THE TROUBLED SEA.
    • TROUBLED MEN ON THE TROUBLED SEA.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • A CLOUD DIFFERENT FROM THE OTHERS ENTERS ON THE SCENE.
    • A CLOUD DIFFERENT FROM THE OTHERS ENTERS ON THE SCENE.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • HARDQUANONNE.
    • HARDQUANONNE.
    • CHAPTER VI.
      • THEY THINK THAT HELP IS AT HAND.
    • THEY THINK THAT HELP IS AT HAND.
    • CHAPTER VII.
      • SUPERHUMAN HORRORS.
    • SUPERHUMAN HORRORS.
    • CHAPTER VIII.
      • NIX ET NOX.
    • NIX ET NOX.
    • CHAPTER IX.
      • THE CHARGE CONFIDED TO A RAGING SEA.
    • THE CHARGE CONFIDED TO A RAGING SEA.
    • CHAPTER X.
      • THE COLOSSAL SAVAGE, THE STORM.
    • THE COLOSSAL SAVAGE, THE STORM.
    • CHAPTER XI.
      • THE CASKETS.
    • THE CASKETS.
    • CHAPTER XII.
      • FACE TO FACE WITH THE ROCK.
    • FACE TO FACE WITH THE ROCK.
    • CHAPTER XIII.
      • FACE TO FACE WITH NIGHT.
    • FACE TO FACE WITH NIGHT.
    • CHAPTER XIV.
      • ORTACH.
    • ORTACH.
    • CHAPTER XV.
      • PORTENTOSUM MARE.
    • PORTENTOSUM MARE.
    • CHAPTER XVI.
      • THE PROBLEM SUDDENLY WORKS IN SILENCE.
    • THE PROBLEM SUDDENLY WORKS IN SILENCE.
    • CHAPTER XVII.
      • THE LAST RESOURCE.
    • THE LAST RESOURCE.
    • CHAPTER XVIII.
      • THE HIGHEST RESOURCE.
    • THE HIGHEST RESOURCE.
    • BOOK THE THIRD.
      • THE CHILD IN THE SHADOW.
    • THE CHILD IN THE SHADOW.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • CHESIL.
    • CHESIL.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • THE EFFECT OF SNOW.
    • THE EFFECT OF SNOW.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • A BURDEN MAKES A ROUGH ROAD ROUGHER.
    • A BURDEN MAKES A ROUGH ROAD ROUGHER.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • ANOTHER FORM OF DESERT.
    • ANOTHER FORM OF DESERT.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • MISANTHROPY PLAYS ITS PRANKS.
    • MISANTHROPY PLAYS ITS PRANKS.
    • CHAPTER VI.
      • THE AWAKING.
    • THE AWAKING.
    • PART II.
    • BOOK THE FIRST.
      • THE EVERLASTING PRESENCE OF THE PAST: MAN REFLECTS MAN.
    • THE EVERLASTING PRESENCE OF THE PAST: MAN REFLECTS MAN.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • LORD CLANCHARLIE.
      • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
    • LORD CLANCHARLIE.
    • I.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • LORD DAVID DIRRY-MOIR.
      • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
    • LORD DAVID DIRRY-MOIR.
    • I.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • THE DUCHESS JOSIANA.
      • II.
      • III.
    • THE DUCHESS JOSIANA.
    • II.
    • III.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • THE LEADER OF FASHION.
    • THE LEADER OF FASHION.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • QUEEN ANNE.
      • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
    • QUEEN ANNE.
    • I.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • CHAPTER VI.
      • BARKILPHEDRO.
    • BARKILPHEDRO.
    • CHAPTER VII.
      • BARKILPHEDRO GNAWS HIS WAY.
    • BARKILPHEDRO GNAWS HIS WAY.
    • CHAPTER VIII.
      • INFERI.
    • INFERI.
    • CHAPTER IX.
      • HATE IS AS STRONG AS LOVE.
    • HATE IS AS STRONG AS LOVE.
    • CHAPTER X.
      • THE FLAME WHICH WOULD BE SEEN IF MAN WERE TRANSPARENT.
    • THE FLAME WHICH WOULD BE SEEN IF MAN WERE TRANSPARENT.
    • CHAPTER XI.
      • BARKILPHEDRO IN AMBUSCADE.
    • BARKILPHEDRO IN AMBUSCADE.
    • CHAPTER XII.
      • SCOTLAND, IRELAND, AND ENGLAND.
    • SCOTLAND, IRELAND, AND ENGLAND.
    • BOOK THE SECOND.
      • GWYNPLAINE AND DEA.
    • GWYNPLAINE AND DEA.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • WHEREIN WE SEE THE FACE OF HIM OF WHOM WE HAVE HITHERTO SEEN ONLY THE ACTS.
    • WHEREIN WE SEE THE FACE OF HIM OF WHOM WE HAVE HITHERTO SEEN ONLY THE ACTS.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • DEA.
    • DEA.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • "OCULOS NON HABET, ET VIDET."
    • "OCULOS NON HABET, ET VIDET."
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • WELL-MATCHED LOVERS.
    • WELL-MATCHED LOVERS.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • THE BLUE SKY THROUGH THE BLACK CLOUD.
    • THE BLUE SKY THROUGH THE BLACK CLOUD.
    • CHAPTER VI.
      • URSUS AS TUTOR, AND URSUS AS GUARDIAN.
    • URSUS AS TUTOR, AND URSUS AS GUARDIAN.
    • CHAPTER VII.
      • BLINDNESS GIVES LESSONS IN CLAIRVOYANCE.
    • BLINDNESS GIVES LESSONS IN CLAIRVOYANCE.
    • CHAPTER VIII.
      • NOT ONLY HAPPINESS, BUT PROSPERITY.
    • NOT ONLY HAPPINESS, BUT PROSPERITY.
    • CHAPTER IX.
      • ABSURDITIES WHICH FOLKS WITHOUT TASTE CALL POETRY.
    • ABSURDITIES WHICH FOLKS WITHOUT TASTE CALL POETRY.
    • CHAPTER X.
      • AN OUTSIDER'S VIEW OF MEN AND THINGS.
    • AN OUTSIDER'S VIEW OF MEN AND THINGS.
    • CHAPTER XI.
      • GWYNPLAINE THINKS JUSTICE, AND URSUS TALKS TRUTH.
    • GWYNPLAINE THINKS JUSTICE, AND URSUS TALKS TRUTH.
    • CHAPTER XII.
      • URSUS THE POET DRAGS ON URSUS THE PHILOSOPHER.
    • URSUS THE POET DRAGS ON URSUS THE PHILOSOPHER.
    • BOOK THE THIRD.
      • THE BEGINNING OF THE FISSURE.
    • THE BEGINNING OF THE FISSURE.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • THE TADCASTER INN.
    • THE TADCASTER INN.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • OPEN-AIR ELOQUENCE.
    • OPEN-AIR ELOQUENCE.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • WHERE THE PASSER-BY REAPPEARS.
    • WHERE THE PASSER-BY REAPPEARS.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • CONTRARIES FRATERNIZE IN HATE.
    • CONTRARIES FRATERNIZE IN HATE.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • THE WAPENTAKE.
    • THE WAPENTAKE.
    • CHAPTER VI.
      • THE MOUSE EXAMINED BY THE CATS.
    • THE MOUSE EXAMINED BY THE CATS.
    • CHAPTER VII.
      • WHY SHOULD A GOLD PIECE LOWER ITSELF BY MIXING WITH A HEAP OF PENNIES?
    • WHY SHOULD A GOLD PIECE LOWER ITSELF BY MIXING WITH A HEAP OF PENNIES?
    • CHAPTER VIII.
      • SYMPTOMS OF POISONING.
    • SYMPTOMS OF POISONING.
    • CHAPTER IX.
      • ABYSSUS ABYSSUM VOCAT.
    • ABYSSUS ABYSSUM VOCAT.
    • BOOK THE FOURTH.
      • THE CELL OF TORTURE.
    • THE CELL OF TORTURE.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • THE TEMPTATION OF ST. GWYNPLAINE.
    • THE TEMPTATION OF ST. GWYNPLAINE.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • FROM GAY TO GRAVE.
    • FROM GAY TO GRAVE.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • LEX, REX, FEX.
    • LEX, REX, FEX.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • URSUS SPIES THE POLICE.
    • URSUS SPIES THE POLICE.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • A FEARFUL PLACE.
    • A FEARFUL PLACE.
    • CHAPTER VI.
      • THE KIND OF MAGISTRACY UNDER THE WIGS OF FORMER DAYS.
    • THE KIND OF MAGISTRACY UNDER THE WIGS OF FORMER DAYS.
    • CHAPTER VII.
      • SHUDDERING.
    • SHUDDERING.
    • CHAPTER VIII.
      • LAMENTATION.
    • LAMENTATION.
    • BOOK THE FIFTH.
      • THE SEA AND FATE ARE MOVED BY THE SAME BREATH.
    • THE SEA AND FATE ARE MOVED BY THE SAME BREATH.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • THE DURABILITY OF FRAGILE THINGS.
    • THE DURABILITY OF FRAGILE THINGS.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • THE WAIF KNOWS ITS OWN COURSE.
    • THE WAIF KNOWS ITS OWN COURSE.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • AN AWAKENING.
    • AN AWAKENING.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • FASCINATION.
    • FASCINATION.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • WE THINK WE REMEMBER; WE FORGET.
    • WE THINK WE REMEMBER; WE FORGET.
    • BOOK THE SIXTH.
      • URSUS UNDER DIFFERENT ASPECTS.
    • URSUS UNDER DIFFERENT ASPECTS.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • WHAT THE MISANTHROPE SAID.
    • WHAT THE MISANTHROPE SAID.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • WHAT HE DID.
    • WHAT HE DID.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • COMPLICATIONS.
    • COMPLICATIONS.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • MOENIBUS SURDIS CAMPANA MUTA.
    • MOENIBUS SURDIS CAMPANA MUTA.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • STATE POLICY DEALS WITH LITTLE MATTERS AS WELL AS WITH GREAT.
    • STATE POLICY DEALS WITH LITTLE MATTERS AS WELL AS WITH GREAT.
    • BOOK THE SEVENTH.
      • THE TITANESS.
    • THE TITANESS.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • THE AWAKENING.
    • THE AWAKENING.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • THE RESEMBLANCE OF A PALACE TO A WOOD.
    • THE RESEMBLANCE OF A PALACE TO A WOOD.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • EVE.
    • EVE.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • SATAN.
    • SATAN.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • THEY RECOGNIZE, BUT DO NOT KNOW, EACH OTHER.
    • THEY RECOGNIZE, BUT DO NOT KNOW, EACH OTHER.
    • BOOK THE EIGHTH.
      • THE CAPITOL AND THINGS AROUND IT.
    • THE CAPITOL AND THINGS AROUND IT.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • ANALYSIS OF MAJESTIC MATTERS.
    • ANALYSIS OF MAJESTIC MATTERS.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • IMPARTIALITY.
    • IMPARTIALITY.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • THE OLD HALL.
    • THE OLD HALL.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • THE OLD CHAMBER.
    • THE OLD CHAMBER.
    • CHAPTER V.
      • ARISTOCRATIC GOSSIP.
    • ARISTOCRATIC GOSSIP.
    • CHAPTER VI.
      • THE HIGH AND THE LOW.
    • THE HIGH AND THE LOW.
    • CHAPTER VII.
      • STORMS OF MEN ARE WORSE THAN STORMS OF OCEANS.
    • STORMS OF MEN ARE WORSE THAN STORMS OF OCEANS.
    • CHAPTER VIII.
      • HE WOULD BE A GOOD BROTHER, WERE HE NOT A GOOD SON.
    • HE WOULD BE A GOOD BROTHER, WERE HE NOT A GOOD SON.
    • BOOK THE NINTH.
      • IN RUINS.
    • IN RUINS.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • IT IS THROUGH EXCESS OF GREATNESS THAT MAN REACHES EXCESS OF MISERY.
    • IT IS THROUGH EXCESS OF GREATNESS THAT MAN REACHES EXCESS OF MISERY.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • THE DREGS.
    • THE DREGS.
    • CONCLUSION.
      • THE NIGHT AND THE SEA.
    • THE NIGHT AND THE SEA.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • A WATCH-DOG MAY BE A GUARDIAN ANGEL.
    • A WATCH-DOG MAY BE A GUARDIAN ANGEL.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • BARKILPHEDRO, HAVING AIMED AT THE EAGLE, BRINGS DOWN THE DOVE.
    • BARKILPHEDRO, HAVING AIMED AT THE EAGLE, BRINGS DOWN THE DOVE.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • PARADISE REGAINED BELOW.
    • PARADISE REGAINED BELOW.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • NAY; ON HIGH!
    • NAY; ON HIGH!
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