Letters of John Calvin, Volume II (of 4) Compiled from the Original Manuscripts and Edited with Historical Notes
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Letters of John Calvin, Volume II (of 4) Compiled from the Original Manuscripts and Edited with Historical Notes

By Jules Bonnet
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Table of Contents
  • LETTERS OF JOHN CALVIN
  • DR. JULES BONNET.
  • CONTENTS.
  • CALVIN'S LETTERS.
  • CXLIV.—To Viret.[1]
    • Unpopularity of Calvin—various advices.
  • CXLV.—To Monsieur de Falais.[2]
    • Exhortation to glorify God amid poverty and persecution.
  • CXLVI.—To Madame de Falais.
    • Congratulations on the constancy manifested by her in the midst of trials—salutations from the suffering Idelette de Bure.
  • CXLVII.—To Monsieur de Falais.[3]
    • Vanity of trust reposed in the princes of this world—confidence in God.
  • CXLVIII.—To Farel.[4]
    • Captivity of Farel's brother—ravages of the plague in Geneva.
  • CXLIX.—To Viret.
    • Dispersion of the School at Geneva—contests at Neuchatel on the subject of church property—Calvin's opinion of Farel.
  • CL.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Prayers for his restoration to health.
  • CLI.—To Farel.
    • News from Germany—journey of the French Ambassadors to Geneva—details concerning the condition of the town.
  • CLII.—To Monsieur de Falais.[17]
    • Calvin dedicates to him one of his Commentaries.
  • CLIII.—To John Frellon.[21]
    • Rupture of the Relations between Calvin and Servetus.
  • CLIV.—To Farel.
    • Reply to various questions—terrible threat against Servetus—imprisonment of one of the leaders of the Libertins.
  • CLV.—To Farel.
    • Pacification of the Church at Neuchatel—report of the speedy arrival of the Emperor in Savoy—dangers at Geneva—withering mention of Francis I.
  • CLVI.—To Viret.
    • Election of a minister at Neuchatel—sickness of Viret's wife.
  • CLVII.—To Viret.[34]
    • Calvin invites his friend to repair to Geneva after the death of his wife.
  • CLVIII.—To Viret.
    • Renewed and more pressing invitation to come to Geneva.
  • CLIX. To Theodore Vitus.[36]
    • Indication of the various documents wherein are set forth the opinions of Calvin regarding the Lord's Supper—earnest desire for union and peace among the Churches—condition of Geneva.
  • CLX.—To Viret.[41]
    • Instructions to Viret about a journey to Geneva.
  • CLXI.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Calvin's labours—the diet at Ratisbon—the Church at Metz—the reformation at Heidelberg—apology for M. de Falais—opinion regarding the sermons of Ochino.
  • CLXII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Advice regarding the editing of the Apology—details of a loan contracted for M. de Falais—news from Germany and Italy—Farel and Viret at Geneva—death of Juan Diaz.
  • CLXIII.—To Farel.[56]
    • Troubles at Geneva—imprisonment of the several members of the family of Favre—account of the assassination of John Diaz at Neubourg.
  • CLXIV.—To Amy Perrin.[60]
    • Complaints regarding the conduct of Perrin—firm and courageous declaration by the Reformer of his resolution to persevere in his duty unto death.
  • CLXV.—To Farel and Viret.[61]
    • Requests in favour of the faithful in France.
  • CLXVI.—To Madame de Falais.
    • Expression of Christian sympathy and condolence on occasion of the illness of M. de Falais.
  • CLXVII.—To Farel.[68]
    • Excitement caused at Geneva by the Representation of a Play.
  • CLXVIII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Proposals of matrimony on behalf of Viret.
  • CLXIX.—To Viret.
    • Account of the steps taken relative to his marriage.
  • CLXX.—To Viret.
    • Fresh details regarding the projects for his marriage.
  • CLXXI.—To Viret.
    • Same subject as the preceding.
  • CLXXII.—To Viret.[72]
    • Breaking off of the match treated of in the preceding letters.
  • CLXXIII.—To Farel.
    • Violence of the family of Amy Perrin—declamations of the wife of Froment against the ministers of Geneva.
  • CLXXIV.—To Farel.
    • Calvin's indisposition—literary labours—apparent reconciliation with Perrin and his family.
  • CLXXV.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Recurrence to the matrimonial projects of Viret—explanations on various subjects.
  • CLXXVI.—To Madame de Falais.
    • Sad communication to be made to M. de Falais—promise to send several discourses.
  • CLXXVII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Congratulations on his convalescence—uncertainty of prospects in Germany—confidence in the all-powerful protection of God.
  • CLXXVIII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Excuses for Viret—uses of sickness—various rumours concerning the war in Germany—explanations on the subject of the Supper.
  • CLXXIX.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Consolations on the death of his sister.
  • CLXXX.—To Madame de Falais.
    • Assurances of affection for herself and her husband.
  • CLXXXI.—To Viret.
    • Statement of the expense of a visit to Lausanne, on the occasion of Viret's marriage—ecclesiastical difficulties at Berne.
  • CLXXXII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Military movements in Switzerland—policy of the Cantons in reference to the Emperor.
  • CLXXXIII.—To Madame de Budé.[97]
    • Calvin exhorts this lady to leave France, and retire with her family to Geneva.
  • CLXXXIV.—To the Avoyer Nœguely.[100]
    • Complaints of the misconduct of several ministers in the Pays de Vaud.
  • CLXXXV.—To Farel.[103]
    • Mission of Calvin to Switzerland—dispositions of the various Cantons.
  • CLXXXVI.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Search for a house for that gentleman in Geneva—Various details—Mention of Charles V. and Francis I.
  • CLXXXVII.—To Monsieur de Falais.[111]
    • Instructions regarding the Apology—alarming rumours current at Geneva—Calvin's confidence.
  • CLXXXVIII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Disputes of M. de Falais with Valeran Poulain—Reports of the expected arrival of the former in Geneva.
  • CLXXXIX.—To Valeran Poulain.[116]
    • Severe reprobation of his behaviour towards M. de Falais—reply to a calumny directed against the Reformer.
  • CXC.—To Viret.[117]
    • Weakness of the Genevese magistracy—Expectation of Viret's arrival in Geneva.
  • CXCI.—To Wolfgang Musculus.[121]
    • Anxiety regarding the Churches of Germany—advice to Musculus.
  • CXCII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Steps taken at Basle to retract a promise of marriage made to Valeran Poulain.
  • CXCIII.—To Francis Dryander.[125]
    • Confused state of the Church—hopes and fears for the future.
  • CXCIV.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • The sending of a minister—perplexities regarding anticipated events in Germany.
  • CXCV.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Information in regard to a house—advice on the subject of a marriage proposed for a relative of Monsieur de Falais.
  • CXCVI.—To Viret.
    • Interview of Calvin with a senator of Berne—advantage secured over the party of the Libertins.
  • CXCVII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Recommendation of John de Budé—Uncertainty of the news from Germany.
  • CXCVIII.—To Monsieur de Budé.[137]
    • He exhorts him to follow the example of the rest of his family, and retire to Geneva.
  • CXCIX.—To Viret.
    • Citation of the wife of Amy Perrin before the Consistory—case of Gruet—news from Germany.
  • CC.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Solemn lessons afforded by the sad occurrences in Germany—troubles in Geneva—energetic attitude of Calvin.
  • CCI.—To Viret.[150]
    • Indecision of the Seigneurs of Geneva—inflexibility of Calvin.
  • CCII.—To the Faithful of France.[151]
    • State of Germany—details regarding the struggles of the Reformer in the cause of the truth at Geneva.
  • CCIII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Thanksgiving for the happy deliverance of Madame de Falais—false reports concerning the state of Geneva—details regarding the publication of the Apology—indisposition of Calvin, and his regret at being separated from Monsieur de Falais.
  • CCIV.—To Farel.
    • False report of Calvin's death—proposition (query) by the wife of Amy Perrin—calumnious accusation against Idelette de Bure—journey of Farel to Geneva.
  • CCV.—To Viret.
    • Mention of a letter from M. de Falais—Emmanuel Tremelli—a book by Viret—journey of Budé and Nicolas des Gallars to Paris.
  • CCVI.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Dedication of the Apology—mention of M. de Montmor—Sickness of Maldonado.
  • CCVII.—To Henry Bullinger.
    • Comments by Calvin on a work by Bullinger—state of Germany and Italy—policy of the Cantons.
  • CCVIII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Return of Nicolas Des Gallars—stay of Farel and Viret at Geneva.
  • CCIX.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Re-assuring intelligence on the state of Geneva—restoration of Maldonado.
  • CCX.—To Farel.
    • Sad state of the Republic—discouragement of the Reformer.
  • CCXI.—To Viret.[177]
    • Rising at the Hôtel de Ville—heroic bearing of Calvin—trust in God alone.
  • CCXII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Printing of The Apology—troubles at Geneva.
  • CCXIII.—To Viret.[178]
    • Invitation to come to Geneva.
  • CCXIV.—To Farel.
    • Publication of The Antidote—statement regarding the condition of Geneva.
  • CCXV.—To the Family of Budé.[182]
    • Consolations on occasion of the Death of one of its Members.
  • CCXVI.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Cost of printing The Apology—despatch of several copies.
  • CCXVII.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Particulars regarding his departure, and the purchase of a property near Geneva.
  • CCXVIII.—To Henry Bullinger.[190]
    • Brotherly explanations regarding the difference on the subject of the Communion.
  • CCXIX.—To Monsieur de Falais.
    • Obstacles to his departure—delay of some months.
  • CCXX.—To Farel.[194]
    • Distressing condition of the Swiss churches.
  • CCXXI—To Farel and Viret.[195]
    • Disputes among the ministers of Berne—and Calvin's journey thither.
  • CCXXII.—To Viret.
    • Communications regarding affairs at Berne.
  • CCXXIII.—To Viret.[197]
    • Ecclesiastical tyranny of the Seigneurs of Berne—sojourn of Idelette de Bure at Lausanne.
  • CCXXIV.—To Henry Bullinger.[199]
    • New explanations regarding the Supper—Violence of some of the Bernese ministers—Calvinism and Buceranism.
  • CCXXV.—To Monsieur de Falais.[201]
    • Preparations for the marriage of Mademoiselle de Wilergy, his relation.
  • CCXXVI.—To Farel.
    • Uncertainty regarding the disposition of the Cantons—stay of Monsieur and Madame de Falais in Calvin's house.
  • CCXXVII.—To Viret.[207]
    • Embarrassment occasioned to Calvin by the treacherous publication of one of his letters to Viret.
  • CCXXVIII.—To a French Seigneur.[208]
    • Exhortation to come to Geneva, that he might there serve the Lord faithfully.
  • CCXXIX.—To the Protector Somerset.[209]
    • Duties imposed on the Protector by the high office which he holds—plan of a complete reformation in England—preaching of the pure word of God—rooting out of abuses—correction of vices and scandalous offences.
  • CCXXX.—To Farel.
    • Election of new magistrates at Geneva—troubles in France—letter from Bucer.
  • CCXXXI.—To John Sturm.[214]
    • Evidences of faith and Christian steadfastness, amid the dangers that threaten the Church.
  • CCXXXII.—To Madame de Cany.[216]
    • Exhortation to a courageous and honest profession of the truth.
  • CCXXXIII.—To Mademoiselle de....
    • Exhortations to steadfastness in the faith—acknowledgment of liberality.
  • CCXXXIV.—To the Ministers of the Church of Montbeliard.[218]
    • Exhortations to discharge to the end their ministerial duties.
  • CCXXXV.—To Henry Bullinger.[219]
    • Hope of union with the theologians of Zurich—dedication of several writings.
  • CCXXXVI.—To Bucer.[223]
    • Consolations to be found in the study of divine and everlasting truth.
  • CCXXXVII.—To the Pastors of the Church of Berne.[224]
    • Desire of union between the Churches of Berne and Geneva.
  • CCXXXVIII.—To Viret.[225]
    • Death of Idelette de Bure, the wife of Calvin.
  • CCXXXIX.—To Farel.
    • Further details regarding the death of Idelette de Bure.
  • CCXL.—To Madame de Cany.[229]
    • Account of the instructive death of Madame Laurent de Normandie.
  • CCXLI.—To Viret.
    • Various particulars—recommendation of Francis Hotman, Jurisconsult.
  • CCXLII.—To Henry Bullinger.[235]
    • Pleading in favour of the alliance of the Reformed Cantons with France.
  • CCXLIII.—To Madame de la Roche-Posay.[236]
    • He exhorts her and her companions to live in conformity with the law of God.
  • CCXLIV.—To Bucer.[237]
    • Encouragements and consolations—desire for the conclusion of peace between France and England—excesses of the ultra-Lutheran party in Switzerland and Germany—agreement between the Churches of Geneva and Zurich.
  • CCXLV.—To Lady Anne Seymour.[244]
    • Thanks to the Duchess of Somerset, the mother of Anne Seymour—exhortation to perseverance in the true faith.
  • CCXLVI.—To Farel.
    • Reply by the Protector of England to a letter from Calvin.
  • CCXLVII.—To Farel.
    • Imprisonment of two brothers of M. de Falais—persecution in the Low Countries and in France.
  • CCXLVIII.—To Viret.
    • Negotiations in reference to the publication of the Consensus—George, Count of Montbeliard.
  • CCXLIX.—To the Pastors of the Church of Zurich.[250]
    • Urgent recommendation of the adoption of a fixed formulary in the celebration of the Lord's Supper.
  • CCL.—To Bullinger.[251]
    • Revisal of the Formulary—persecutions in France.
  • CCLI.—To Farel and Viret.
    • Letter concerning Vergerio—history of Francis Spira.
  • CCLII.—To Farel.[257]
    • Criticism on a work by Farel.
  • CCLIII.—To Viret.
    • First mention of Theodore Beza—poverty of Calvin's colleagues.
  • CCLIV.—To John Haller.[263]
    • A Reformer's complaints on the malevolence of the Bernese ministers.
  • CCLV.—To Wolfgang Musculus.[265]
    • Prohibition of the Vaudois Conferences—remonstrances on the intolerance of the Bernese ministers towards those of France.
  • CCLVI.—To Monsieur de Saint Laurens.[268]
    • Statement of leading articles of the Reformed Faith.
  • CCLVII.—To the Protector Somerset.[269]
    • Congratulations on the royal favour shown to the Duke of Somerset—use to be made of his influence for spreading the Gospel in England.
  • CCLVIII.—To Farel.
    • Tidings from Germany and England—recommendation of a domestic.
  • CCLIX.—To Farel.
    • Election of a new Pope.
  • CCLX.—To Francis Dryander.[276]
    • Counsels and encouragements—collection of commentaries on Isaiah by Des Gallars.
  • CCLXI.—To Nicolas Colladon.[277]
    • Settlement of the Colladon family at Geneva.
  • CCLXII.—To the Seigneury of Geneva.[280]
    • Notice of a publication attributed to Gruet.
  • CCLXIII.—To Melanchthon.[281]
    • Controversies excited in Germany by the establishment of the Interim—Brotherly reproofs.
  • CCLXIV.—To Viret.
    • Hope of an early visit from Viret—projected excursions in the neighbourhood of Geneva.
  • CCLXV.—To Farel.
    • Opinion regarding Vergerio—intelligence regarding Bucer—letter to Melanchthon—disputes with Berne—literary publications of Calvin.
  • CCLXVI.—To William Rabot.[294
    • Exhortation to the study of the Scriptures.
  • CCLXVII.—To Farel.
    • Publication of the book on Scandals—persecution by the King of France—Bucer's discouragement.
  • CCLXVIII.—To Farel.
    • State of religion in England—Calvin's literary labours—arrival of Robert Stephens at Geneva.
  • CCLXIX.—To Monsieur de Falais.[310]
    • Misconduct of a servant of M. de Falais.
  • CCLXX.—To Haller.[313]
    • Explanations on the subject of the abolition of the great festivals at Geneva.
  • CCLXXI.—To Viret.[316]
    • Criticism of a mandate published by the Seigneurs of Berne.
  • CCLXXII.—To Richard Le Fevre.[318]
    • Explanations regarding various points of doctrine in dispute between the Romish and the Reformed Churches.
  • CCLXXIII.—To Viret.
    • Various particulars—literary labours of Theodore Beza.
  • CCLXXIV.—To the King of England.[321]
    • He exhorts him to persevere in the work of the Reformation in his kingdom—enumeration of abuses—ceremonies—ecclesiastical elections—universities.
  • CCLXXV.—To Bullinger.[323]
    • He excuses the infrequency of his letters, and urges the publication of the Consensus.
  • CCLXXVI.—To Bullinger.
    • Thanks for a document—dedication of two commentaries to the King of England—captivity of Bishop Hooper—movements of the Emperor in Germany.
  • CCLXXVII.—To Bullinger.
    • Mention of a letter to the Duke of Somerset—Re-opening of the Council of Trent—symptoms of war in Europe.
  • CCLXXVIII.—To Viret.[333]
    • Death of Bucer and of Joachim Vadian.
  • CCLXXIX.—To Farel.
    • Renewed expressions of regret for the death of Vadian and Bucer—controversies excited by Osiandor—numerous migrations to Geneva—commencement of hostilities in Italy.
  • CCLXXX.—To a French Gentleman.[341]
    • Sickness of Theodore Beza—Calvin's grief.
  • CCLXXXI.—To the Duke of Somerset.[342]
    • Protestations of attachment—reforms required in the Church of England—squandering of the revenues of benefices and of the universities.
  • CCLXXXII.—To Viret.
    • Reply to the attacks of Pighius, and of George of Sicily.
  • CCLXXXIII.—To the Ministers of Neuchatel.
    • Arrest of a minister from Neuchatel in France—steps for obtaining his release.
  • CCLXXXIV.—To Bullinger.[345]
    • Edict of Chateaubriand, in France—attacks on Calvin in Geneva.
  • CCLXXXV.—To the Ministers of Switzerland.[348]
    • Statement of the controversy with Bolsec regarding Election.
  • CCLXXXVI.—To Oswald Myconius.[349]
    • Recommendations regarding the dispute with Bolsec—request on behalf of the Protestants of France.
  • CCLXXXVII.—To Christopher Fabri.[352]
    • Calvin's dissatisfaction with the reply of the ministers of Bâle, and the conduct of Monsieur de Falais regarding the affair with Bolsec.
  • CCLXXXVIII.—To Farel.
    • Recommendation of a schoolmaster—complaints against the ministers of Zurich.
  • CCLXXXIX.—To Lelio Socin.[356]
    • Refusal to reply to the curious questions proposed to him by Socin.
  • CCXC.—To Bullinger.[358]
    • Thanks for the zeal manifested on behalf of the faithful in France—Complaints of the conduct of the Ministers of Zurich in the affair of Bolsec.
  • CCXCI.—To Farel.
    • Fresh complaints by Calvin against the ministers of Zurich and Berne—his unpopularity in the latter city—advices to Farel.
  • CCXCII.—To Madame de Cany.[363]
    • Rigorous and inflexible spirit of Calvin against heresy—Praise of Theodore Beza.
  • CCXCIII.—To Bullinger.[368]
    • Journey of Calvin and Farel in Switzerland—steps in favour of the Reformed in France—return to the affairs of Bolsec.
  • CCXCIV.-To Cranmer.[372]
    • Agreement to the proposal for assembling a General Synod for the more close union of the Reformed Churches.
  • CCXCV.—To Bullinger.
    • Fresh details regarding the persecutions in France.
  • CCXCVI.—To the Five Prisoners of Lyons,—Martial Alba, Peter Escrivain, Charles Favre, Peter Naviheres, Bernard Seguin.[376]
    • Information on various doctrinal points, and assurances of Christian sympathy.
  • CCXCVII—To Edward VI.[377]
    • Dedication of a new work, and Christian exhortations.
  • CCXCVIII—To Cranmer.[380]
    • Calvin exhorts him to prosecute with fresh zeal the Reformation of the Church in England, by purging it of the relics of Popery.
  • CCXCIX.—To John Liner.[381]
    • Thanks for the zeal manifested by him on behalf of the prisoners of Lyons.
  • CCC.—To the French Church in London.[382]
    • Exhortations to harmony—Is it lawful to call Mary the Mother of God, and to pray for the Pope?
  • CCCI.—To the Seigneurs of Geneva.[384]
    • Reply of Calvin to the Syndics of Geneva in the case of Trolliet.
  • CCCII.—To Farel.[391]
    • Conspiracy of the Libertines—energy of the Reformer—struggles of Viret at Lausanne.
  • CCCIII.—To Viret.
    • Literary labours of Theodore Beza.
  • CCCIV.—To Ambroise Blaurer.[397]
    • Troubles at Geneva—sad intelligence from France and Germany—steady in the promises of God.
  • CCCV.—To Melanchthon.[400]
    • Earnest desires for the continuance of their mutual affection—disputes with Trolliet—longing for agreement in doctrine regarding the Communion and Election.
  • CCCVI.—To Monsieur de Falais.[403]
    • Rupture of Calvin with that Seigneur.
  • CCCVII.—To Mathieu Dimonet.[406]
    • Exhortation to patience and constancy under persecution.
  • CCCVIII.—To Christopher Fabri.
    • Congratulations on the subject of his approaching marriage—Calvin's regret that he cannot be present at the ceremony.
  • CCCIX.—To John Cheke.[413]
    • Calvin apologizes for silence, and enjoins him to use his influence with the King for the advancement of the Gospel in England.
  • CCCX.—To the Five Prisoners of Lyons.[414]
    • Exhortations to constancy—Mention of Oritz, the Inquisitor.
  • CCCXI—To Edward VI.
    • Recommendation of a French gentleman, a prisoner for the sake of the Gospel.
  • CCCXII.—To Farel.[419]
    • Serious illness and unexpected recovery of Farel—Calvin's joy.
  • CCCXIII.—To Christoper and to Thomas Zollicoffre.[420]
    • Last steps in favour of the Prisoners of Lyons.
  • CCCXIV.—To Cranmer.
    • He entreats his influence in favour of the person already recommended to the King.
  • CCCXV.—To Monsieur de Marolles.[423]
    • Christian encouragement and consolation.
  • CCCXVI.—To Viret.[425]
    • Extinction of all hope in regard to the prisoners of Lyons.
  • CCCXVII.—To Bullinger.[427]
    • Assurances of respect and fraternal affection.
  • CCCXVIII.—To the Five Prisoners of Lyons.[431]
    • He exhorts them to steadfastness unto the end, in the assurance of eternal joy reserved in heaven.
  • CCCXIX.—To Madame de Cany.[433]
    • Expression of Christian sympathy under trial.
  • CCCXX.—To the Prisoners of Lyons.[435]
    • He impresses on them the duty of maintaining their confession of the truth quietly and modestly.
  • CCCXXI.—To Bullinger.
    • Expression of regret for the death of the King of England—sad condition of the German Churches.
  • CCCXXII.—To Farel.[437]
    • Arrest of Servetus, and institution of the process against him.
  • CCCXXIII.—To Denis Peloquin and Louis de Marsac.[440]
    • Information regarding various controverted points—exhortation to fidelity, even unto martyrdom.
  • CCCXXIV.—To his dearly Beloved, the Pastors of the Church of Frankfort.[442]
    • Request for the destruction of the copies at Frankfort of the book of Servetus.
  • CCCXXV.—To Viret.[443]
    • Troubles at Geneva—Berthelier and the chiefs of the Libertins are refused admission to the Lord's Table.
  • CCCXXVI.—To Bullinger.
    • Deep anxiety on account of the condition of the English Churches—Conference of the Swiss Churches in regard to Servetus.
  • CCCXXVII.—To Sulzer.[449]
    • Statement of the errors of Servetus, and of the duty of the Christian magistrate to repress them.
  • CCCXXVIII.—To a Captive Lady.[452]
    • He consoles her under her trials, and exhorts her to use every means to secure her retreat to Geneva.
  • CCCXXIX.—To the Believers in the Isles.[453]
    • Religious counsels, and announcement of the sending of a minister.
  • CCCXXX.—To Farel.
    • Acknowledgment of Farel's care for the Church of Geneva.
  • CCCXXXI.—To Farel.[458]
    • Deliverance by the Swiss Churches regarding Servetus—vain efforts of Calvin to obtain a mitigation of his punishment.
  • CCCXXXII.—To Madame De Pons.
    • He encourages her to come out of the spiritual bondage in which she is held.
  • CCCXXXIII.—To Viret.[460]
    • Recommendation of several English refugees in Switzerland.
  • CCCXXXIV.—To Bullinger.[462]
    • Appeal to the Magistrates of Zurich in reference to ecclesiastical discipline—thanks for the aid afforded by the ministers of that Church in the affair of Servetus.
  • CCCXXXV.—To the Pastors and Doctors of the Church of Zurich.[464]
    • Account of the struggles at Geneva for the maintenance of ecclesiastical discipline—appeal to the Pastors of Zurich for their influence with the magistrates of that town.
  • CCCXXXVI.—To Bullinger.
    • Fresh details regarding ecclesiastical discipline—hope of speedy realization—announcement of the publication of a book against the errors of Servetus.
  • CCCXXXVII.—To Farel.[469]
    • Assistance afforded to the faithful refugees in Switzerland—reply of the Churches on the subject of ecclesiastical discipline.
  • CCCXXXVIII.—To an Italian Lady.[470]
    • He exhorts her to withdraw, by a voluntary exile, from the persecution and idolatry reigning in Italy.
  • CCCXXXIX.—To a Seigneur of Jersey.[471]
    • Christian exhortations—sending of a minister.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • Transcriber's note:"
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