Mr. Punch at the Play: Humours of Music and the Drama
Free

Mr. Punch at the Play: Humours of Music and the Drama

By Various
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE.
    • PUNCH LIBRARY OF HUMOUR
  • MR. PUNCH AT THE PLAY
    • MR. PUNCH AT THE PLAY
      • HUMOURS OF MUSIC AND THE DRAMA
        • THE EDUCATIONAL BOOK CO. LTD
      • THE EDUCATIONAL BOOK CO. LTD
      • THE PUNCH LIBRARY OF HUMOUR
    • HUMOURS OF MUSIC AND THE DRAMA
      • THE EDUCATIONAL BOOK CO. LTD
    • THE EDUCATIONAL BOOK CO. LTD
    • THE PUNCH LIBRARY OF HUMOUR
    • BEFORE THE CURTAIN
    • MR. PUNCH AT THE PLAY
    • SOMETHING FOR THE MONEY
      • The Drama.
      • TRUE APPRECIATION
      • ON A DRAMATIC AUTHOR
    • The Drama.
    • TRUE APPRECIATION
    • ON A DRAMATIC AUTHOR
    • THE MANAGER'S COMPLAINT
      • A First Night.
      • "The Desire of the Moth for the Star.
      • The Counter-Check Quarrelsome.
      • Sweeping Assertion.
    • A First Night.
    • "The Desire of the Moth for the Star.
    • The Counter-Check Quarrelsome.
    • Sweeping Assertion.
    • DRAMATIC NOTES OF THE FUTURE
      • MODERN IMPRESSIONIST ART. A MUSICAL COMEDY
      • AT THE PREMIÈRE
      • THE BILL OF THE PLAY
      • Amenities of the Profession.
      • THE HIGHER EDUCATION OF WOMEN
      • Private Theatricals.
      • An Infant Roscius.
      • A Soliloquy.
      • "Shakspeare and the first Quart O"
      • "Shakspeare and the last Quart O"
      • The Music-hall
      • Screaming Farcical Comedy.
      • A Melodrama at the "Surrey".
      • A pathetic "Comedy-Drama."
      • Another.
      • The Opera.
      • A patriotic Drama at the "National Theatre".
      • And
      • Three acts
      • of Henrik Ibsen.
      • The deplorable issue.
      • "MOST MUSICAL, MOST MELANCHOLY"
      • MUSIC OF THE FUTURE. SENSATION OPERA.
      • "Cross Old Thing!"
      • Our Theatricals.
      • Technical.
      • A Double Disappointment.
      • Modest Appeal.
    • MODERN IMPRESSIONIST ART. A MUSICAL COMEDY
    • AT THE PREMIÈRE
    • THE BILL OF THE PLAY
    • Amenities of the Profession.
    • THE HIGHER EDUCATION OF WOMEN
    • Private Theatricals.
    • An Infant Roscius.
    • A Soliloquy.
    • "Shakspeare and the first Quart O"
    • "Shakspeare and the last Quart O"
    • The Music-hall
    • Screaming Farcical Comedy.
    • A Melodrama at the "Surrey".
    • A pathetic "Comedy-Drama."
    • Another.
    • The Opera.
    • A patriotic Drama at the "National Theatre".
    • And
    • Three acts
    • of Henrik Ibsen.
    • The deplorable issue.
    • "MOST MUSICAL, MOST MELANCHOLY"
    • MUSIC OF THE FUTURE. SENSATION OPERA.
    • "Cross Old Thing!"
    • Our Theatricals.
    • Technical.
    • A Double Disappointment.
    • Modest Appeal.
    • A MODERN REHEARSAL
    • NEO-DRAMATIC NURSERY RHYME
    • HINTS TO AMATEUR PLAYWRIGHTS.
      • QUITE OF HER OPINION
    • QUITE OF HER OPINION
    • THE DECLINE OF THE DRAMA
    • CONTRIBUTION TOWARDS NURSERY RHYMES
      • IN THE STALLS
      • IN THE STALLS
      • MITIGATING CIRCUMSTANCES
      • A Studied Insult.
      • "The Sleeping Beauty."
      • Collaborateurs.
    • IN THE STALLS
    • IN THE STALLS
    • MITIGATING CIRCUMSTANCES
    • A Studied Insult.
    • "The Sleeping Beauty."
    • Collaborateurs.
    • WHY I DON'T WRITE PLAYS
      • Her First Play.
      • Mellow drammer
      • First Night of an Unappreciated Melodrama.
      • THE COMMISSARIAT
      • A NOTE AND QUERY
      • MR. PUNCH'S OPERA BOX
      • SIC VOS NON VOBIS DRAMATISATIS, WRITERS!
    • Her First Play.
    • Mellow drammer
    • First Night of an Unappreciated Melodrama.
    • THE COMMISSARIAT
    • A NOTE AND QUERY
    • MR. PUNCH'S OPERA BOX
    • SIC VOS NON VOBIS DRAMATISATIS, WRITERS!
    • MEM. BY A MANAGER
    • REVISED VERSION OF SHAKSPEARE
      • A solo on the horn
      • After the Performance.
      • SCENES FROM MR. PUNCH'S PANTOMIME. Scene I.—The Tragic Mews
      • SCENES FROM MR. PUNCH'S PANTOMIME. Scene II.—The Comic Mews
      • Ambiguous.
      • Our Theatricals.
      • Mazeppa. "Again he urges on his wild career!!!"
      • Distinguished Amateurs. The Actor.
      • Distinguished Amateurs. The Jeune Premier.
      • Music by handle.
      • THE SWING OF THE PENDULUM
      • Turning a Phrase.
      • Scene— A Booth in the Wild West
      • "Men Were Deceivers Ever"
      • The Commentators.
      • A Disenchantment
      • "JUST HINT A FAULT" Little Tommy Bodkin takes his cousins to the gallery of the Opera
    • A solo on the horn
    • After the Performance.
    • SCENES FROM MR. PUNCH'S PANTOMIME. Scene I.—The Tragic Mews
    • SCENES FROM MR. PUNCH'S PANTOMIME. Scene II.—The Comic Mews
    • Ambiguous.
    • Our Theatricals.
    • Mazeppa. "Again he urges on his wild career!!!"
    • Distinguished Amateurs. The Actor.
    • Distinguished Amateurs. The Jeune Premier.
    • Music by handle.
    • THE SWING OF THE PENDULUM
    • Turning a Phrase.
    • Scene— A Booth in the Wild West
    • "Men Were Deceivers Ever"
    • The Commentators.
    • A Disenchantment
    • "JUST HINT A FAULT" Little Tommy Bodkin takes his cousins to the gallery of the Opera
    • THE MOAN OF A THEATRE-MANAGER
      • Ibsen in Brixton.
      • A five bar rest
      • LESSONS LEARNED AT A PANTOMIME
      • THE NEW PLAY
      • A quick movement with an obligato accompaniment.
      • TERRIFIC SITUATION!
      • APPRECIATIVE!
      • SCENE FROM SHAKSPEARIAN PANTOMIME
      • A Disenchantment.
      • The Problem Play.
      • CHURCH THEATRES FOR COUNTRY VILLAGES—THE BLAMELESS BALLET
      • Confrères.
      • A PROP OF THE DRAMA
      • SHOWING THAT SOMETIMES IT IS GOOD FOR A COBBLER NOT TO STICK TO HIS LAST
      • An Unkind Cut.
      • A CROWDED HOUSE
      • THE PROVINCIAL DRAMA
      • A CONDUCTOR OF HEAT
      • "STARTLING EFFECTS!"
      • EX NIHILO NIHIL FIT
      • HOW HE OUGHT NOT TO LOOK
      • PREHISTORIC SHAKSPEARE.—"MACBETH"
      • MUSIC-HALL INANITIES.—I.
    • Ibsen in Brixton.
    • A five bar rest
    • LESSONS LEARNED AT A PANTOMIME
    • THE NEW PLAY
    • A quick movement with an obligato accompaniment.
    • TERRIFIC SITUATION!
    • APPRECIATIVE!
    • SCENE FROM SHAKSPEARIAN PANTOMIME
    • A Disenchantment.
    • The Problem Play.
    • CHURCH THEATRES FOR COUNTRY VILLAGES—THE BLAMELESS BALLET
    • Confrères.
    • A PROP OF THE DRAMA
    • SHOWING THAT SOMETIMES IT IS GOOD FOR A COBBLER NOT TO STICK TO HIS LAST
    • An Unkind Cut.
    • A CROWDED HOUSE
    • THE PROVINCIAL DRAMA
    • A CONDUCTOR OF HEAT
    • "STARTLING EFFECTS!"
    • EX NIHILO NIHIL FIT
    • HOW HE OUGHT NOT TO LOOK
    • PREHISTORIC SHAKSPEARE.—"MACBETH"
    • MUSIC-HALL INANITIES.—I.
    • MUSIC-HALL INANITIES.—II. The Illustrative Method.
    • ATTENTION AT THE PLAY.
      • Melodrama in the Suburbs.
      • The Ruling Passion.
    • Melodrama in the Suburbs.
    • The Ruling Passion.
    • HIS FIRST AND LAST PLAY
      • Paradoxical.
      • FORM
      • PROPERTY HAS ITS RIGHTS
      • The Point of View.
      • THE FORTHCOMING PANTOMIME
      • MR. PUNCH'S PATENT MATINEE HAT.
      • Heard at a Provincial Circus.
      • The Amateurs.
      • CAUSE AND EFFECT
      • "EXCLUSIVE"
      • The Drama.
      • The Maiden's Point of View.
      • A COMEDIE FRANÇAISE
      • "Those Who Live in Glass Houses," Etc.
      • A very cold audience.
      • A CASE OF "NO COMPRENNY"
    • Paradoxical.
    • FORM
    • PROPERTY HAS ITS RIGHTS
    • The Point of View.
    • THE FORTHCOMING PANTOMIME
    • MR. PUNCH'S PATENT MATINEE HAT.
    • Heard at a Provincial Circus.
    • The Amateurs.
    • CAUSE AND EFFECT
    • "EXCLUSIVE"
    • The Drama.
    • The Maiden's Point of View.
    • A COMEDIE FRANÇAISE
    • "Those Who Live in Glass Houses," Etc.
    • A very cold audience.
    • A CASE OF "NO COMPRENNY"
    • BETWEEN THE ACTS; OR, THE DRAMA IN LIQUOR
      • An Irresistible Appeal.
      • What our Dramatist has to put up with.
      • OVERHEARD OUTSIDE A THEATRE
      • STUDY
      • COLOURED CLERGY
      • SUPEREROGATION
      • After the Theatricals.
      • A DOMESTIC DRAMA
      • PROGRESS
    • An Irresistible Appeal.
    • What our Dramatist has to put up with.
    • OVERHEARD OUTSIDE A THEATRE
    • STUDY
    • COLOURED CLERGY
    • SUPEREROGATION
    • After the Theatricals.
    • A DOMESTIC DRAMA
    • PROGRESS
    • "HAMLET" A LA SAUCE DUMB-CRAMBO
      • "Oh, that this too, too solid flesh would melt!"—Act I., Sc. 2.
      • "I could a tail unfold!"—Ibid.
      • "What a falling off was there!"—Ibid.
      • "Methinks I scent the morning hair!"—Ibid.
      • "Brief let me be!"—Ibid.
      • "Lend thy serious ear-ring to what I shall unfold!"—Act I., Sc. 5.
      • "Toby, or not Toby? that is the question."—Act II., Sc. 2.
      • "The King, sir."—"Ay, sir, what of him?"—"Is in his retirement marvellous distempered."—"With drink, sir!"—"No, my lord, rather with collar!"—Act III., Sc. 2.
      • "Oh, my offence is rank!"—Act III., Sc. 3.
      • "Put your bonnet to his right use—'tis for the head."—Act V., Sc. 2.
      • "Coming Events cast their Shadows before them."
      • A SENSITIVE EAR.
    • "Oh, that this too, too solid flesh would melt!"—Act I., Sc. 2.
    • "I could a tail unfold!"—Ibid.
    • "What a falling off was there!"—Ibid.
    • "Methinks I scent the morning hair!"—Ibid.
    • "Brief let me be!"—Ibid.
    • "Lend thy serious ear-ring to what I shall unfold!"—Act I., Sc. 5.
    • "Toby, or not Toby? that is the question."—Act II., Sc. 2.
    • "The King, sir."—"Ay, sir, what of him?"—"Is in his retirement marvellous distempered."—"With drink, sir!"—"No, my lord, rather with collar!"—Act III., Sc. 2.
    • "Oh, my offence is rank!"—Act III., Sc. 3.
    • "Put your bonnet to his right use—'tis for the head."—Act V., Sc. 2.
    • "Coming Events cast their Shadows before them."
    • A SENSITIVE EAR.
    • DUMB-CRAMBO'S GUIDE TO THE LONDON THEATRES
      • Drew wry lane
      • Cove in garden
      • Cry-teary 'un
      • Prints of whales
      • "A—mark it!"
      • Gay at tea
      • Princesses and royal tea
      • Globe
      • "Scent, James?"
      • Strand and "save, hoi!"
      • Only in play!
      • The actor who has his head turned with applause
      • CURTAIN-RAISERS
      • MUSIC HALL TYPES
      • MUSIC HALL TYPES
      • MUSIC HALL TYPES
      • On Tour.
      • Art and Nature.
      • CONVINCING
    • Drew wry lane
    • Cove in garden
    • Cry-teary 'un
    • Prints of whales
    • "A—mark it!"
    • Gay at tea
    • Princesses and royal tea
    • Globe
    • "Scent, James?"
    • Strand and "save, hoi!"
    • Only in play!
    • The actor who has his head turned with applause
    • CURTAIN-RAISERS
    • MUSIC HALL TYPES
    • MUSIC HALL TYPES
    • MUSIC HALL TYPES
    • On Tour.
    • Art and Nature.
    • CONVINCING
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