Free

Sheppard Lee, Written by Himself. Vol. II (of 2)

By Robert Montgomery Bird
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • SHEPPARD LEE.
  • WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.
    • IN TWO VOLUMES.
      • VOL. II
      • CONTENTS
    • VOL. II
    • CONTENTS
    • SHEPPARD LEE.
      • BOOK IV (continued)
      • CONTAINING ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE FOLLY OF BRINGING UP CHILDREN
      • THE MISER'S CHILDREN.
      • THE FATE OF THE FIRSTBORN.
      • THE CATASTROPHE OF A TRAGEDY OFTEN PERFORMED ON THE GREAT STAGE OF LIFE.
      • IN WHICH IT IS SHOWN THAT A MAN MAY BE MORE USEFUL AFTER DEATH THAN WHILE LIVING.
      • SHEPPARD LEE'S SEARCH FOR A BODY.—AN UNCOMMON INCIDENT.
      • IN WHICH THE AUTHOR MAKES THE ACQUAINTANCE OF A PHILANTHROPIST.
      • CONTAINING AN AFFECTING ADVENTURE WITH A VICTIM OF THE LAW.
      • IN WHICH THE PLOT THICKENS, AND THE TRAGEDY GROWS DEEPER.
      • CONTAINING THE ADVENTURES OF A GOOD SAMARITAN.
      • THE PHILANTHROPIST'S FAMILY.
      • SOME ACCOUNT OF THE WORTHY ABEL SNIPE.
      • IN WHICH THE YOUNG MAN JONATHAN ARGUES SEVERAL CASES OF CONSCIENCE, WHICH ARE RECOMMENDED TO BE BROUGHT BEFORE YEARLY MEETING.
      • CONTAINING LITTLE OR NOTHING SAVE APOSTROPHES, EXHORTATIONS, AND QUARRELS.
      • WHICH IS SHORT AND MORAL, AND CAN THEREFORE BE SKIPPED.
      • AN INCONVENIENCE OF BEING IN ANOTHER MAN'S BODY, WHEN CALLED UPON TO GIVE EVIDENCE AS TO ONE'S OWN EXIT.
      • THE SORROWS OF A PHILANTHROPIST.
      • THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED.
      • CONTAINING A DIFFICULTY.
      • IN WHAT MANNER MR. ZACHARIAH LONGSTRAW DETERMINED TO IMPROVE HIS FORTUNE.
      • IN WHICH A CATASTROPHE BEGINS.
      • IN WHICH THE CATASTROPHE IS CONTINUED.
      • THE DÉNOUEMENT OF THE DRAMA.
      • A REMARK, IN WHICH THE AUTHOR APPEARS AS A POLITICIAN, AND ABUSES BOTH PARTIES.
      • AN UNCOMMON ADVENTURE THAT BEFELL THE AUTHOR.
      • IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE TAKES A JOURNEY, AND DISCOVERS THE SECRET OBJECT OF HIS CAPTORS.
      • CONTAINING OTHER SECRETS, BUT NOT SO IMPORTANT.
      • IN WHICH THE AUTHOR APPROACHES A CLIMAX IN HIS ADVENTURES.
      • CONTAINING A SPECIMEN OF ELOQUENCE, WITH SOME ACCOUNT OF THE DANGERS OF LYNCHDOM.
      • IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE REACHES THE DARKEST PERIOD OF HIS EXISTENCE.
      • CONTAINING A HISTORY AND A MORAL.
      • IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE FINDS EVERY THING BLACK ABOUT HIM.
      • IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE IS INTRODUCED TO HIS MASTER.
      • AN OLD WOMAN'S CURE FOR A DISEASE EXTREMELY PREVALENT BOTH IN THE COLOURED AND UNCOLOURED CREATION.
      • SOME ACCOUNT OF RIDGEWOOD HILL, AND THE AUTHOR'S OCCUPATIONS.
      • IN WHICH THE AUTHOR FURTHER DESCRIBES HIS SITUATION, AND PHILOSOPHIZES ON THE STATE OF SLAVERY.
      • RECOLLECTIONS OF SLAVERY.
      • A SCENE ON THE BANKS OF THE POTOMAC, WITH THE HUMOURS OF AN AFRICAN IMPROVISATORE.
      • THE AUTHOR DESCENDS AMONG THE SLAVES, AND SUDDENLY BECOMES A MAN OF FIGURE, AND AN INTERPRETER OF NEW DOCTRINES.
      • WHAT IT WAS THE NEGROES HAD DISCOVERED AMONG THE SCANTLING.
      • THE EFFECT OF THE PAMPHLET ON ITS READER AND HEARERS.
      • THE HATCHING OF A CONSPIRACY.
      • HOW THE SPOILS OF VICTORY WERE INTENDED TO BE DIVIDED.
      • THE ATTACK OF THE INSURGENTS UPON THE MANSION AT RIDGEWOOD HILL.
      • THE TRAGICAL OCCURRENCES THAT FOLLOWED.
      • THE RESULTS OF THE INSURRECTION, WITH A TRULY STRANGE AND FATAL CATASTROPHE THAT BEFELL THE AUTHOR.
      • IN WHICH IT IS RELATED WHAT BECAME OF THE AUTHOR AFTER BEING HANGED.
      • WHICH IS INTENDED AS A PENDANT TO BOOK I., AND CONTAINS THE HISTORY OF A YOUNG GENTLEMAN OF FORTUNE.
      • CONTAINING AN INKLING OF THE LIFE AND HABITS OF MR. ARTHUR MEGRIM.
      • THE HAPPY CONDITION IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE IS AT LAST PLACED.
      • THE EMPLOYMENTS OF A YOUNG GENTLEMAN OF FORTUNE.
      • SOME ACCOUNT OF THE INCONVENIENCES OF HAVING A DIGESTIVE APPARATUS.
      • THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED, WITH AN ACCOUNT OF SEVERAL SURPRISING TRANSFORMATIONS.
      • AN ACCOUNT OF THE WOES OF AN EMPEROR OF FRANCE, WHICH HAVE NEVER BEFORE APPEARED IN HISTORY.
      • IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE IS CONVINCED THAT ALL IS NOT GOLD WHICH GLISTENS.
      • IN WHICH THE AUTHOR STUMBLES UPON AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE.
      • CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF THE WONDERFUL DISCOVERIES OF THE GERMAN DOCTOR.
      • CONTAINING A MORE WONDERFUL DISCOVERY ON THE PART OF SHEPPARD LEE, WITH PERHAPS THE MOST SURPRISING ADVENTURE THAT EVER BEFELL HIM.
      • CONTAINING THE CONCLUSION OF THE HISTORY.
      • SHEPPARD LEE FLIES FROM THE GERMAN DOCTOR, AND FINDS HIMSELF AGAIN IN NEW-JERSEY.
      • WHAT HAD HAPPENED AT WATERMELON HILL DURING THE AUTHOR'S ABSENCE.
      • CONTAINING THE SUBSTANCE OF A SINGULAR DEBATE BETWIXT THE AUTHOR AND HIS BROTHER, WITH A PHILOSOPHIC DEFENCE OF THE AUTHOR'S CREDIBILITY.
      • BEING THE LAST CHAPTER OF ALL.
    • BOOK IV (continued)
    • CONTAINING ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE FOLLY OF BRINGING UP CHILDREN
    • THE MISER'S CHILDREN.
    • THE FATE OF THE FIRSTBORN.
    • THE CATASTROPHE OF A TRAGEDY OFTEN PERFORMED ON THE GREAT STAGE OF LIFE.
    • IN WHICH IT IS SHOWN THAT A MAN MAY BE MORE USEFUL AFTER DEATH THAN WHILE LIVING.
    • SHEPPARD LEE'S SEARCH FOR A BODY.—AN UNCOMMON INCIDENT.
    • IN WHICH THE AUTHOR MAKES THE ACQUAINTANCE OF A PHILANTHROPIST.
    • CONTAINING AN AFFECTING ADVENTURE WITH A VICTIM OF THE LAW.
    • IN WHICH THE PLOT THICKENS, AND THE TRAGEDY GROWS DEEPER.
    • CONTAINING THE ADVENTURES OF A GOOD SAMARITAN.
    • THE PHILANTHROPIST'S FAMILY.
    • SOME ACCOUNT OF THE WORTHY ABEL SNIPE.
    • IN WHICH THE YOUNG MAN JONATHAN ARGUES SEVERAL CASES OF CONSCIENCE, WHICH ARE RECOMMENDED TO BE BROUGHT BEFORE YEARLY MEETING.
    • CONTAINING LITTLE OR NOTHING SAVE APOSTROPHES, EXHORTATIONS, AND QUARRELS.
    • WHICH IS SHORT AND MORAL, AND CAN THEREFORE BE SKIPPED.
    • AN INCONVENIENCE OF BEING IN ANOTHER MAN'S BODY, WHEN CALLED UPON TO GIVE EVIDENCE AS TO ONE'S OWN EXIT.
    • THE SORROWS OF A PHILANTHROPIST.
    • THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED.
    • CONTAINING A DIFFICULTY.
    • IN WHAT MANNER MR. ZACHARIAH LONGSTRAW DETERMINED TO IMPROVE HIS FORTUNE.
    • IN WHICH A CATASTROPHE BEGINS.
    • IN WHICH THE CATASTROPHE IS CONTINUED.
    • THE DÉNOUEMENT OF THE DRAMA.
    • A REMARK, IN WHICH THE AUTHOR APPEARS AS A POLITICIAN, AND ABUSES BOTH PARTIES.
    • AN UNCOMMON ADVENTURE THAT BEFELL THE AUTHOR.
    • IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE TAKES A JOURNEY, AND DISCOVERS THE SECRET OBJECT OF HIS CAPTORS.
    • CONTAINING OTHER SECRETS, BUT NOT SO IMPORTANT.
    • IN WHICH THE AUTHOR APPROACHES A CLIMAX IN HIS ADVENTURES.
    • CONTAINING A SPECIMEN OF ELOQUENCE, WITH SOME ACCOUNT OF THE DANGERS OF LYNCHDOM.
    • IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE REACHES THE DARKEST PERIOD OF HIS EXISTENCE.
    • CONTAINING A HISTORY AND A MORAL.
    • IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE FINDS EVERY THING BLACK ABOUT HIM.
    • IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE IS INTRODUCED TO HIS MASTER.
    • AN OLD WOMAN'S CURE FOR A DISEASE EXTREMELY PREVALENT BOTH IN THE COLOURED AND UNCOLOURED CREATION.
    • SOME ACCOUNT OF RIDGEWOOD HILL, AND THE AUTHOR'S OCCUPATIONS.
    • IN WHICH THE AUTHOR FURTHER DESCRIBES HIS SITUATION, AND PHILOSOPHIZES ON THE STATE OF SLAVERY.
    • RECOLLECTIONS OF SLAVERY.
    • A SCENE ON THE BANKS OF THE POTOMAC, WITH THE HUMOURS OF AN AFRICAN IMPROVISATORE.
    • THE AUTHOR DESCENDS AMONG THE SLAVES, AND SUDDENLY BECOMES A MAN OF FIGURE, AND AN INTERPRETER OF NEW DOCTRINES.
    • WHAT IT WAS THE NEGROES HAD DISCOVERED AMONG THE SCANTLING.
    • THE EFFECT OF THE PAMPHLET ON ITS READER AND HEARERS.
    • THE HATCHING OF A CONSPIRACY.
    • HOW THE SPOILS OF VICTORY WERE INTENDED TO BE DIVIDED.
    • THE ATTACK OF THE INSURGENTS UPON THE MANSION AT RIDGEWOOD HILL.
    • THE TRAGICAL OCCURRENCES THAT FOLLOWED.
    • THE RESULTS OF THE INSURRECTION, WITH A TRULY STRANGE AND FATAL CATASTROPHE THAT BEFELL THE AUTHOR.
    • IN WHICH IT IS RELATED WHAT BECAME OF THE AUTHOR AFTER BEING HANGED.
    • WHICH IS INTENDED AS A PENDANT TO BOOK I., AND CONTAINS THE HISTORY OF A YOUNG GENTLEMAN OF FORTUNE.
    • CONTAINING AN INKLING OF THE LIFE AND HABITS OF MR. ARTHUR MEGRIM.
    • THE HAPPY CONDITION IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE IS AT LAST PLACED.
    • THE EMPLOYMENTS OF A YOUNG GENTLEMAN OF FORTUNE.
    • SOME ACCOUNT OF THE INCONVENIENCES OF HAVING A DIGESTIVE APPARATUS.
    • THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED, WITH AN ACCOUNT OF SEVERAL SURPRISING TRANSFORMATIONS.
    • AN ACCOUNT OF THE WOES OF AN EMPEROR OF FRANCE, WHICH HAVE NEVER BEFORE APPEARED IN HISTORY.
    • IN WHICH SHEPPARD LEE IS CONVINCED THAT ALL IS NOT GOLD WHICH GLISTENS.
    • IN WHICH THE AUTHOR STUMBLES UPON AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE.
    • CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF THE WONDERFUL DISCOVERIES OF THE GERMAN DOCTOR.
    • CONTAINING A MORE WONDERFUL DISCOVERY ON THE PART OF SHEPPARD LEE, WITH PERHAPS THE MOST SURPRISING ADVENTURE THAT EVER BEFELL HIM.
    • CONTAINING THE CONCLUSION OF THE HISTORY.
    • SHEPPARD LEE FLIES FROM THE GERMAN DOCTOR, AND FINDS HIMSELF AGAIN IN NEW-JERSEY.
    • WHAT HAD HAPPENED AT WATERMELON HILL DURING THE AUTHOR'S ABSENCE.
    • CONTAINING THE SUBSTANCE OF A SINGULAR DEBATE BETWIXT THE AUTHOR AND HIS BROTHER, WITH A PHILOSOPHIC DEFENCE OF THE AUTHOR'S CREDIBILITY.
    • BEING THE LAST CHAPTER OF ALL.
      No comment for this book yet, be the first to comment
      You May Also Like
      Also Available On
      Categories
      Curated Lists