A Ramble of Six Thousand Miles through the United States of America
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A Ramble of Six Thousand Miles through the United States of America

By S. A. (Simon Ansley) Ferrall
Free
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  • The Project Gutenberg eBook, A Ramble of Six Thousand Miles through the United States of America, by S. A. Ferrall
  • A RAMBLE OF SIX THOUSAND MILES THROUGH THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.
    • LONDON
      • 1832
    • 1832
    • PREFACE.
    • CONTENTS
      • PREFACE CHAPTER I Sail for New York in an American vessel—the crew—ostentation of the Captain—a heavy gale—soundings—icebergs—bay of New York—Negros and Negresses—White Ladies—climate—fires—vagrant pigs—Frances Wright—Match between an Indian canoe and a skiff CHAPTER II Depart for Albany—the Hudson—Albany—Cohoe's Falls—Rome—the Little Falls—forest of charred trees—"stilly night" in a swamp—fire fly—Rochester—Falls of Gennessee—Sam. Patch—an eccentric character—Falls of Niagara—the Tuscarora Indians—Buffalo—Lake Erie—the Iroquois—the Wyandots—death of Seneca John, and its consequences—ague fever—Wyandot prairie—the Delawares' mode of dealing with the Indians—the transporting of Negros to Canada CHAPTER III Arrive at Marion—divorces—woodlands—Columbus—land offices—population, &c. Shaking Quakers—kidnapping free Negros—Cincinnati—the farmers of Ohio—a corn-husking frolic—qualifications necessary to Senators, Legislators, and Electors—a camp-meeting—militia officers' muster—Presbyterian parsons—price of land, cattle, &c.—fever and ague CHAPTER IV Set out for New Harmony—the roads—a backwoodsman—the journey—peaches—casualties—travelling—New Harmony—M. Le Seur—barter—excursion down the Wabash—the co-operative community—Robert Owen CHAPTER V Depart for St. Louis—Albion—the late Messrs. Birkbeck and Flowers—Hardgrove's prairie—the roads—the Grand prairie—prairie wolf—mode of training dogs—Elliott's inn—inhabitants of Illinois—ablutions—coal—soil and produce—the American Bottom—St Louis—monopolies—Fur companies—incivility of a certain Major—trapping expedition—trade with Santa Fé—lead mines—Carondalot—Jefferson barracks—discipline—visit to a slave-holder—the Ioway hostages—Indian investigation—character of the Indians. CHAPTER VI Leave St. Louis—Indian mounds—remains of ancient fortifications—burial caverns—mummies—Flint's description of a mummy—the languages of America—town making—the Indian summer—population, &c. of Illinois—the prairie hen—the Turkey buzzard—settlers—forest in autumn—a gouging scrape—the country—extent and population of Indiana—hogs—a settler in bottom land—the sugar maple—roads—a baptism CHAPTER VII Set out for New Orleans—Louisville—Mississippi steam-boats—the Ohio—the Mississippi—sugar plantations—the valley of the Mississippi—New Orleans—Quadroons—slavery—a Methodist slavite—runaway Negros—incendiary fires at Orleans—liberty of the press—laws passed by the legislature of Louisiana—Miss Wright—public schools—yellow fever—the Texas CHAPTER VIII Depart for Louisville—tellandsea, or Spanish moss—Natchez—the yellow fever—cotton plantations—Mississippi wood-cutters—freshets—planters, sawyers, and snags—steam-boat blown up—the Chickesaws—hunting in Tennessee—electioneering—vote by ballot—trade on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers—the People—the President's veto—finances—government banks—Kentucky—the Kentuckians—court-houses—an election—universal suffrage—an Albino—Diluvian reliqua CHAPTER IX The political condition of the Indians—Missionaries—the letter of Red-jacket—the speech of the wandering Pawnee chief CHAPTER X Kenhawa salt-works—coal—a Radical—rattle-snakes—Baltimore—Philadelphia—taxation—shipping CHAPTER XI "The Workies"—Miss Wright—the opening of the West India ports to American vessels—voyage homeward—the stormy petrel—Gulf weed—the remora—the molusca—quarantine APPENDIX EXTRACTS
    • PREFACE CHAPTER I Sail for New York in an American vessel—the crew—ostentation of the Captain—a heavy gale—soundings—icebergs—bay of New York—Negros and Negresses—White Ladies—climate—fires—vagrant pigs—Frances Wright—Match between an Indian canoe and a skiff CHAPTER II Depart for Albany—the Hudson—Albany—Cohoe's Falls—Rome—the Little Falls—forest of charred trees—"stilly night" in a swamp—fire fly—Rochester—Falls of Gennessee—Sam. Patch—an eccentric character—Falls of Niagara—the Tuscarora Indians—Buffalo—Lake Erie—the Iroquois—the Wyandots—death of Seneca John, and its consequences—ague fever—Wyandot prairie—the Delawares' mode of dealing with the Indians—the transporting of Negros to Canada CHAPTER III Arrive at Marion—divorces—woodlands—Columbus—land offices—population, &c. Shaking Quakers—kidnapping free Negros—Cincinnati—the farmers of Ohio—a corn-husking frolic—qualifications necessary to Senators, Legislators, and Electors—a camp-meeting—militia officers' muster—Presbyterian parsons—price of land, cattle, &c.—fever and ague CHAPTER IV Set out for New Harmony—the roads—a backwoodsman—the journey—peaches—casualties—travelling—New Harmony—M. Le Seur—barter—excursion down the Wabash—the co-operative community—Robert Owen CHAPTER V Depart for St. Louis—Albion—the late Messrs. Birkbeck and Flowers—Hardgrove's prairie—the roads—the Grand prairie—prairie wolf—mode of training dogs—Elliott's inn—inhabitants of Illinois—ablutions—coal—soil and produce—the American Bottom—St Louis—monopolies—Fur companies—incivility of a certain Major—trapping expedition—trade with Santa Fé—lead mines—Carondalot—Jefferson barracks—discipline—visit to a slave-holder—the Ioway hostages—Indian investigation—character of the Indians. CHAPTER VI Leave St. Louis—Indian mounds—remains of ancient fortifications—burial caverns—mummies—Flint's description of a mummy—the languages of America—town making—the Indian summer—population, &c. of Illinois—the prairie hen—the Turkey buzzard—settlers—forest in autumn—a gouging scrape—the country—extent and population of Indiana—hogs—a settler in bottom land—the sugar maple—roads—a baptism CHAPTER VII Set out for New Orleans—Louisville—Mississippi steam-boats—the Ohio—the Mississippi—sugar plantations—the valley of the Mississippi—New Orleans—Quadroons—slavery—a Methodist slavite—runaway Negros—incendiary fires at Orleans—liberty of the press—laws passed by the legislature of Louisiana—Miss Wright—public schools—yellow fever—the Texas CHAPTER VIII Depart for Louisville—tellandsea, or Spanish moss—Natchez—the yellow fever—cotton plantations—Mississippi wood-cutters—freshets—planters, sawyers, and snags—steam-boat blown up—the Chickesaws—hunting in Tennessee—electioneering—vote by ballot—trade on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers—the People—the President's veto—finances—government banks—Kentucky—the Kentuckians—court-houses—an election—universal suffrage—an Albino—Diluvian reliqua CHAPTER IX The political condition of the Indians—Missionaries—the letter of Red-jacket—the speech of the wandering Pawnee chief CHAPTER X Kenhawa salt-works—coal—a Radical—rattle-snakes—Baltimore—Philadelphia—taxation—shipping CHAPTER XI "The Workies"—Miss Wright—the opening of the West India ports to American vessels—voyage homeward—the stormy petrel—Gulf weed—the remora—the molusca—quarantine APPENDIX EXTRACTS
    • CHAPTER I
    • CHAPTER II
    • CHAPTER III
    • CHAPTER IV
    • CHAPTER V
    • CHAPTER VI
    • CHAPTER VII
    • CHAPTER VIII
    • CHAPTER IX
    • CHAPTER X
    • CHAPTER XI
    • APPENDIX
    • EXTRACTS
    • Extract from a Communication made by a Cherokee Chief.
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