The Practical Values of Space Exploration Report of the Committee on Science and Astronautics, U.S. House of Representatives, Eighty-Sixth Congress, Second Session
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The Practical Values of Space Exploration Report of the Committee on Science and Astronautics, U.S. House of Representatives, Eighty-Sixth Congress, Second Session

By United States. Congress. House. Committee on Science and Astronautics.
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • THE PRACTICAL VALUES OF SPACE EXPLORATION
  • REPORT
    • OF THE
    • COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE AND ASTRONAUTICS U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES EIGHTY-SIXTH CONGRESS SECOND SESSION
      • PURSUANT TO
    • PURSUANT TO
  • H. Res. 133
    • [Serial I]
      • COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE AND ASTRONAUTICS
    • COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE AND ASTRONAUTICS
    • LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
    • LETTER OF SUBMITTAL
  • CONTENTS
    • THE PRACTICAL VALUES OF SPACE EXPLORATION
    • REPORT
  • THE PRACTICAL VALUES OF SPACE EXPLORATION
  • Introduction
    • Figure 1.—A single shot of the 8-barreled Saturn of the future will cost millions of dollars, maybe tens of millions. What makes it worthwhile for the taxpayer?
  • I. The Unseen Values
    • SOME EXAMPLES OF THE UNEXPECTED
    • THE ULTIMATE VALUES
      • Figure 2.—In the years immediately ahead, the orbiting observatory or the manned satellite will uncover crucial information about the nature of the universe.
    • Figure 2.—In the years immediately ahead, the orbiting observatory or the manned satellite will uncover crucial information about the nature of the universe.
    • STEERING A MIDDLE ROAD
    • THE TIME FOR SPACE
      • Figure 3.—The versatile Atlas can be used either for launching man into space or to carry a nuclear warhead as far as 9,000 miles.
    • Figure 3.—The versatile Atlas can be used either for launching man into space or to carry a nuclear warhead as far as 9,000 miles.
  • II. National Security Values
    • THE MILITARY USES
    • OUR POSITION IN THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY
      • Figure 4.—Symbolic of the American effort in space is this Thor-Able rocket, shown here launching the Tiros weather satellite into a near-perfect orbit. This same vehicle, which launched the record-breaking 23 million-mile communication probe—Pioneer V—has contributed enormously to U.S. prestige abroad.
    • Figure 4.—Symbolic of the American effort in space is this Thor-Able rocket, shown here launching the Tiros weather satellite into a near-perfect orbit. This same vehicle, which launched the record-breaking 23 million-mile communication probe—Pioneer V—has contributed enormously to U.S. prestige abroad.
    • SPACE AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR WAR
      • Figure 5.—Today's assembly lines for automobiles and aircraft are being supplemented by the growing astronautics industry, here shown turning out capsules for manned space flight.
    • Figure 5.—Today's assembly lines for automobiles and aircraft are being supplemented by the growing astronautics industry, here shown turning out capsules for manned space flight.
  • III. The Economic Values
    • U.S. EXPENDITURES ON SPACE
    • THE SPREAD OF ECONOMIC BENEFITS
      • Figure 6.—Booster engines of tomorrow, such as this mockup of the 1,500,000 pound thrust single engine, will place broad requirements on men and materials.
    • Figure 6.—Booster engines of tomorrow, such as this mockup of the 1,500,000 pound thrust single engine, will place broad requirements on men and materials.
    • CREATION OF NEW INDUSTRIES
      • Figure 7.—The possible power source for space ships of the future, the ion jet, has significant counterpart uses for the commercial world.
      • Figure 8.—The needs of tomorrow's spacemen will lead to marked advances in human engineering and psychology.
    • Figure 7.—The possible power source for space ships of the future, the ion jet, has significant counterpart uses for the commercial world.
    • Figure 8.—The needs of tomorrow's spacemen will lead to marked advances in human engineering and psychology.
    • ECONOMIC ALLIANCES
    • PRIVATE ENTERPRISE IN SPACE
      • Figure 9.—The electric and electronic needs of the space program are requiring more and more skilled labor.
    • Figure 9.—The electric and electronic needs of the space program are requiring more and more skilled labor.
    • JOBS
    • AUTOMATION AND DISARMAMENT
      • Figure 10.—A host of new materials, skills, and engineering techniques are bound up in the construction of rocket engines such as this first stage booster.
    • Figure 10.—A host of new materials, skills, and engineering techniques are bound up in the construction of rocket engines such as this first stage booster.
  • IV. Values for Everyday Living
    • TECHNOLOGICAL BENEFITS
      • Figure 11.—Vital information about the forces which cause weather can be learned from meteorological satellites such as these. Even a slight increase in the accuracy of weather prediction will be worth millions of dollars annually.
    • Figure 11.—Vital information about the forces which cause weather can be learned from meteorological satellites such as these. Even a slight increase in the accuracy of weather prediction will be worth millions of dollars annually.
    • FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
    • COMMUNICATIONS
    • WEATHER PREDICTION AND MODIFICATION
      • Figure 12.—Storm center over Nebraska photographed by the first U.S. weather satellite, Tiros, on April 1, 1960. The extent of the picture can be seen from the accompanying weather map.
    • Figure 12.—Storm center over Nebraska photographed by the first U.S. weather satellite, Tiros, on April 1, 1960. The extent of the picture can be seen from the accompanying weather map.
    • HEALTH BENEFITS
      • Figure 13.—Biological reactions uncovered in space medicine studies, such as this centrifuge experiment, may lead to important health discoveries.
    • Figure 13.—Biological reactions uncovered in space medicine studies, such as this centrifuge experiment, may lead to important health discoveries.
    • EDUCATION BENEFITS
      • Figure 14.—Exploration within the solar system means a wealth of new knowledge which could lead to learning the secrets of life.
    • Figure 14.—Exploration within the solar system means a wealth of new knowledge which could lead to learning the secrets of life.
  • V. Long-Range Values
    • TROUBLE SPOTS
    • LIMITATIONS ON SPACE RESEARCH
      • Figure 15.—Need for international cooperation in the U.S. space program is illustrated by this map showing the areas from which help must be procured for projects already planned or underway.
    • Figure 15.—Need for international cooperation in the U.S. space program is illustrated by this map showing the areas from which help must be procured for projects already planned or underway.
    • FUNDAMENTAL KNOWLEDGE ABOUT LIFE
    • PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SPIRITUAL VALUES
      • Figure 16.—Space vehicles of the future may look like this artist's drawing of an electrical propulsion craft. The nuclear reactor is located at the extreme left, followed by a neutron shield, heat exchanger, gamma-ray shield and propellant. The center tank houses turbogenerating equipment. Excessive heat is dissipated in the large radiator. At the extreme right are two crew cabins, landing vehicle and a ring-shaped accelerator.
    • Figure 16.—Space vehicles of the future may look like this artist's drawing of an electrical propulsion craft. The nuclear reactor is located at the extreme left, followed by a neutron shield, heat exchanger, gamma-ray shield and propellant. The center tank houses turbogenerating equipment. Excessive heat is dissipated in the large radiator. At the extreme right are two crew cabins, landing vehicle and a ring-shaped accelerator.
    • MATURING OF THE RACE
    • FOOTNOTES:
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