Across China on Foot
Free

Across China on Foot

By Edwin John Dingle
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • ACROSS CHINA ON FOOT
    • CONTENTS
  • Across China on Foot
    • From the Straits to Shanghai
    • INTRODUCTORY
    • FIRST JOURNEY
      • FROM SHANGHAI UP THE LOWER YANGTZE TO ICHANG
    • FROM SHANGHAI UP THE LOWER YANGTZE TO ICHANG
    • CHAPTER I.
    • SECOND JOURNEY
      • ICHANG TO CHUNG-KING, THROUGH THE YANGTZE GORGES
    • ICHANG TO CHUNG-KING, THROUGH THE YANGTZE GORGES
    • CHAPTER II.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • THE YANGTZE RAPIDS
    • THE YANGTZE RAPIDS
    • CHAPTER IV.
    • THIRD JOURNEY
      • CHUNG-KING TO SUI-FU (VIA LUCHOW)
    • CHUNG-KING TO SUI-FU (VIA LUCHOW)
    • CHAPTER V.
    • CHAPTER VI.
    • FOURTH JOURNEY.
      • SUI-FU TO CHAO-T'ONG-FU (VIA LAO-WA-T'AN).
    • SUI-FU TO CHAO-T'ONG-FU (VIA LAO-WA-T'AN).
    • CHAPTER VII.
    • CHAPTER VIII
    • THE CHAO-T'ONG REBELLION OF 1910
    • CHAPTER IX.
    • THE TRIBES OF NORTH-EAST YÜN-NAN, AND MISSION WORK AMONG THEM
    • CHAPTER X.
    • FIFTH JOURNEY.
      • CHAO-T'ONG-FU TO TONG-CH'UAN-FU.
    • CHAO-T'ONG-FU TO TONG-CH'UAN-FU.
    • CHAPTER XI.
    • CHAPTER XII.
    • BOOK II.
    • FIRST JOURNEY
      • TONG-CH'UAN-FU TO THE CAPITAL
    • TONG-CH'UAN-FU TO THE CAPITAL
    • CHAPTER XIII.
    • CHAPTER XIV.
    • SECOND JOURNEY
      • YÜN-NAN-FU TO TALI-FU (VIA CH'U-HSIONG-FU)
    • YÜN-NAN-FU TO TALI-FU (VIA CH'U-HSIONG-FU)
    • CHAPTER XV.
    • CHAPTER XVI.
    • CHAPTER XVII.
    • CHAPTER XVIII.
    • CHAPTER XIX.
    • THIRD JOURNEY
      • TALI-FU TO THE MEKONG VALLEY
    • TALI-FU TO THE MEKONG VALLEY
    • CHAPTER XX.
    • CHAPTER XXI.
    • FOURTH JOURNEY
      • THE MEKONG VALLEY TO TENGYUEH
    • THE MEKONG VALLEY TO TENGYUEH
    • CHAPTER XXII.
    • CHAPTER XXIII.
    • CHAPTER XXIV.
      • THE LI-SU TRIBE OF THE SALWEN VALLEY
    • THE LI-SU TRIBE OF THE SALWEN VALLEY
    • FIFTH JOURNEY
      • TENGYUEH (MOMIEN) TO BHAMO IN UPPER BURMA
    • TENGYUEH (MOMIEN) TO BHAMO IN UPPER BURMA
    • CHAPTER XXV.
    • CHAPTER XXVI.
    • END OF BOOK II.
      • THE SWITZERLAND OF WESTERN CHINA To travel in China is easy over country like this, granted that the traveler sticks to the main road, sample of which is seen at lower right.
        • RED CROSS WORK IN CHINESE REVOLUTION Red Cross workers at mass graves of men killed during the the Chinese Revolution.
        • TEA FOR FOREIGN COUNTRIES Coolies carrying tea packed for export; picture was taken in British concession of Hankow.
        • TEA FROM NATIVE DISTRICTS Picture shows native tea dealers at Ku-kiang bringing in tea for transport to the great tea factories in Hankow, where it is prepared for export.
        • AUTHOR ON NANKING CITY WALL Taken during the Revolution, when Author was acting as war correspondent for world-wide news agencies.
        • AT HANKOW—THE CHICAGO OF CHINA River-front scene at low water, showing junks that transport general cargo down-river from the exporting districts. This is a typical riverfront scene.
        • A LONELY TRAVELER This picture was taken far out in untraveled China Far West. For days you meet no sign of human habitation, and woe betide you if the river rises!
        • EARNING HIS LIVING This coolie, who carries 420-lb. bale of cotton, as seen in the picture, from the ship in the river to the Hankow Bund, probably earns a dollar and a half per week!
        • TEA FOR FOREIGN LANDS Foreign steamers being loaded with native cargoes for export; scene on the Hankow Bund. The tea trade of China has lost considerable ground in recent years.
        • WILLOW PATTERN TEA HOUSE IN SHANGHAI A famous landmark in the native city; said to be one of the oldest tea-houses in China. Much business is transacted in these tea-houses all over the country.
        • THE PERIGRINATING BARBER OF ANCIENT CHINA If there is an "artist" on this earth, it is the Chinese barber. An hour in his chair makes you long for a week in bed to fully recover!
        • AUTHOR'S HOUSEBOAT (WUPAN) In which he passed eighteen days on the Yangtze-kiang; scene at one of the rapids in upper reaches of river.
        • AUTHOR'S MODEST CARAVAN IN SZECH'UAN And a fine body of men they were, kept in order by the general factotum in the foreground—each of them earning about 25 cents a day.
        • QUAINT CHINESE ORCHESTRA HALWAYS MEN Typical old-time orchestra anywhere in China; the Chinese say, "Once a musician, always a musician"—so it usually runs in the family.
        • SCENE ON THE UPPER YANGTZE Author and the cook on the aft of the houseboat after all the dangerous rapids had been passed. The ropes are made of bamboo. En route to Chung-king.
        • MOTLEY GROUP OF HUA MIAO MENFOLK Picture gives an idea of how the Hua Miao in certain sections are being gradually absorbed by the Chinese; these men are typical tenant farmers of the Nou-su.
        • RATHER A RARE PICTURE OF TRIBES Three tribes are shown: White Bones (left), attending her mistress, a Nou-su aristocrat (Black Bones); the children at the right are Hua Miao.
        • AUTHOR'S CARAVAN ON THE MARCH On the main road west of Chung-king—the Author's four-man chair engaged to "save his face," and his servant's two-man chair, followed by the coolies.
        • THE MEKONG BRIDGE A drop occurs from 8,000 feet to 4,000 feet, and then a climb again over precipitous mountains—very hard going—to 8,000 feet. Shrines are at each end of the handsome suspension bridge.
        • THE AUTHOR IN YÜN-NAN This picture was taken after convalescence in Tong-chu'aniu, just before the journey commenced from that city to British Burma, as seen in the second part of "Across China On Foot."
        • THE UBIQUITOUS WATER CARRIER Drawing the water and hewing the wood are daily chores in China, mostly carried out by women—though this is a picture of a man, a half-wit.
        • THE WELCOME FAMILIAR TEA-HOUSE In many provinces of China, tea-houses, of which this one in Eastern Szech'uan is typical, are to be found about every ten li (3 miles) on the main road.
        • SPECIMEN OF "MAIN ROAD" IN N.E. YÜN-NAN Taken in the little-known part of Western China, far from any of China's "great paved highways"; author is in saddle.
        • THE OLD-FASHIONED SOLDIER All foreign travelers are given an official escort in the interior. This fu-song was a noble warrior! But not a bewilderingly efficient protector! He was a very lazy rascal!
        • FAREWELL TO THE TRAVELER These people had never seen a white man, their faces show that, at farewell after a very pleasant stay among them, they were not altogether broken-hearted to see the author go!
        • CONFUCIAN TEMPLE AT TONG-CH'UANFU Where the Author's life was miraculously saved; first temple in which the Author lived. Later, in Tibet, his life was again saved.
        • ANCIENT TIBETAN PRAYER WHEELS The prayer wheel plays an important part in religious observances in Tibet, the ritual often resembling that of the ancient Christian church.
        • WATCH YOUR STEP Picture shows nature of main roads in certain sections of western China; when the rains come, traveling is quite dangerous. Author seen on boulder at right.
        • FAR FROM THE MADDENING THRONG Regimenting the whole village to bid a sad farewell; Samuel Pollard, author's traveling companion on this trip in the wilds, stands under the hat on the right
        • HAPPY FAMILY IN BACKWOODS The Author spent two nights in this crudely-thatched home in the hills. Though poor, the people were extremely hospitable—and invariably happy.
        • PRIMITIVE COAL-MINING IN YÜN-NAN Coal is abundant in many parts of Yün-nan, though production is small and methods of mining very crude. Picture shows tunnel leading underground.
        • These two pictures show (below) the women stripping hemp and (above) weaving it into the picturesque garments they are wearing. They were all dressed up for the occasion. It is surprising what they can do with such primitive appliances. Picture was taken in the hill country beyond Chaotungfu. They are all Hua Miao.
        • HUA MIAO WOMEN AND CHILDREN Basket on woman's back shows general method of transportation in the hilly country inhabited by this fascinating tribe.
        • WASH DAY AMONG THE CHILDREN Scene in the school grounds of the mission at Tongch'uanfu, the "City of the Eastern Streams"—and a very happy little band they are.
        • TWO DAYS OUT FROM YUNGCHANGFU An almost everyday scene in the western part of China—China's "Switzerland"—on the main road from Chung-king to Upper Burma.
        • THE ITINERANT NECROMANCER Predicted the disappearance of the author in five days; was himself found dead in village in three days.
        • COPPER KETTLE LANE IN YÜN-NAN-FU Copper is supposed to be a government monopoly, yet there is always abundance of copper here! One of the most interesting streets in all China.
        • AUTHOR'S CARAVAN FOUR DAYS FROM JOURNEY'S END And a snapshot of the bridge said by Chinese "to be possessed of a demon!"— because it ate up so much money in public subscription, and yet was never in repair!
        • TYPICAL SINGLE-SPAN BRIDGE OF INLAND CHINA. Engineers say that China possesses bridges of more varied design than any other country.
        • Top left—Hua Miao, all men, of North-eastern Yün-nan. Top right—Ch'in Miao, men, of Kwei-chow. Bottom left— Three Heh Miao—all women. Bottom right—Hua Miao—two women have their hair done up in shape of horn to denotes that they are married; others man.
        • A REAL ABORIGINAL FEAST The man on the left scowled in anger as the Author snapped his picture—otherwise, all were happy. For them an exceptional feast, not an everyday affair.
        • WHERE EAST MEETS WEST Playfellows in Far Interior China. The little white girl is the daughter of a missionary in Suifu, Szech'uan, where picture was taken on porch of mission residence.
        • BEAUTIFUL TONG-CH'UANFU IN YÜN-NAN The city in which the Author rested for several months when his right arm was broken; situated between two high ranges, Tongch'uanfu Valley is extremely beautiful.
        • TWO VERY PRACTICAL WOMEN Though their tribes have lived on same range of mountains "for eighty centuries," they speak different languages and lead different life generally. (One carries baby.)
        • IN UNSURVEYED AND LITTLE-TRODDEN YÜN-NAN Picture shows into what a dilapidated condition the roads are allowed to get; off courier roads, this is what you get.
        • IGNORANCE AND POVERTY Characteristic specimens of poor tribes found in wild areas off the beaten path in the province of Yün-nan; their food is rarely above famine conditions.
        • THE TENGYUEH WATERFALL Mountains opposite are about 4,000 feet higher than the Tengyueh Plain, which is about 5,500 feet; over this waterfall one of author's ponies "committed suicide," Chinese said.
        • FAMILY SCENE IN HUA MIAOLAND In many districts of this wild country nothing will grow except corn (maize) and hemp; latter people weave for clothing.
        • REFORMED HUA MIAO STUDENTS TAKING IT EASY Picture shows how much they have benefitted under the missionary's influence. Taken at the British mission compound in Tongch'uanfu.
        • FAR IN THE WILDS OF UNSURVEYED YÜN-NAN Picture gives only a scant idea of the difficulties of negotiating country of this nature. When river is high, there is no bridge. Author on bridge.
      • RED CROSS WORK IN CHINESE REVOLUTION Red Cross workers at mass graves of men killed during the the Chinese Revolution.
      • TEA FOR FOREIGN COUNTRIES Coolies carrying tea packed for export; picture was taken in British concession of Hankow.
      • TEA FROM NATIVE DISTRICTS Picture shows native tea dealers at Ku-kiang bringing in tea for transport to the great tea factories in Hankow, where it is prepared for export.
      • AUTHOR ON NANKING CITY WALL Taken during the Revolution, when Author was acting as war correspondent for world-wide news agencies.
      • AT HANKOW—THE CHICAGO OF CHINA River-front scene at low water, showing junks that transport general cargo down-river from the exporting districts. This is a typical riverfront scene.
      • A LONELY TRAVELER This picture was taken far out in untraveled China Far West. For days you meet no sign of human habitation, and woe betide you if the river rises!
      • EARNING HIS LIVING This coolie, who carries 420-lb. bale of cotton, as seen in the picture, from the ship in the river to the Hankow Bund, probably earns a dollar and a half per week!
      • TEA FOR FOREIGN LANDS Foreign steamers being loaded with native cargoes for export; scene on the Hankow Bund. The tea trade of China has lost considerable ground in recent years.
      • WILLOW PATTERN TEA HOUSE IN SHANGHAI A famous landmark in the native city; said to be one of the oldest tea-houses in China. Much business is transacted in these tea-houses all over the country.
      • THE PERIGRINATING BARBER OF ANCIENT CHINA If there is an "artist" on this earth, it is the Chinese barber. An hour in his chair makes you long for a week in bed to fully recover!
      • AUTHOR'S HOUSEBOAT (WUPAN) In which he passed eighteen days on the Yangtze-kiang; scene at one of the rapids in upper reaches of river.
      • AUTHOR'S MODEST CARAVAN IN SZECH'UAN And a fine body of men they were, kept in order by the general factotum in the foreground—each of them earning about 25 cents a day.
      • QUAINT CHINESE ORCHESTRA HALWAYS MEN Typical old-time orchestra anywhere in China; the Chinese say, "Once a musician, always a musician"—so it usually runs in the family.
      • SCENE ON THE UPPER YANGTZE Author and the cook on the aft of the houseboat after all the dangerous rapids had been passed. The ropes are made of bamboo. En route to Chung-king.
      • MOTLEY GROUP OF HUA MIAO MENFOLK Picture gives an idea of how the Hua Miao in certain sections are being gradually absorbed by the Chinese; these men are typical tenant farmers of the Nou-su.
      • RATHER A RARE PICTURE OF TRIBES Three tribes are shown: White Bones (left), attending her mistress, a Nou-su aristocrat (Black Bones); the children at the right are Hua Miao.
      • AUTHOR'S CARAVAN ON THE MARCH On the main road west of Chung-king—the Author's four-man chair engaged to "save his face," and his servant's two-man chair, followed by the coolies.
      • THE MEKONG BRIDGE A drop occurs from 8,000 feet to 4,000 feet, and then a climb again over precipitous mountains—very hard going—to 8,000 feet. Shrines are at each end of the handsome suspension bridge.
      • THE AUTHOR IN YÜN-NAN This picture was taken after convalescence in Tong-chu'aniu, just before the journey commenced from that city to British Burma, as seen in the second part of "Across China On Foot."
      • THE UBIQUITOUS WATER CARRIER Drawing the water and hewing the wood are daily chores in China, mostly carried out by women—though this is a picture of a man, a half-wit.
      • THE WELCOME FAMILIAR TEA-HOUSE In many provinces of China, tea-houses, of which this one in Eastern Szech'uan is typical, are to be found about every ten li (3 miles) on the main road.
      • SPECIMEN OF "MAIN ROAD" IN N.E. YÜN-NAN Taken in the little-known part of Western China, far from any of China's "great paved highways"; author is in saddle.
      • THE OLD-FASHIONED SOLDIER All foreign travelers are given an official escort in the interior. This fu-song was a noble warrior! But not a bewilderingly efficient protector! He was a very lazy rascal!
      • FAREWELL TO THE TRAVELER These people had never seen a white man, their faces show that, at farewell after a very pleasant stay among them, they were not altogether broken-hearted to see the author go!
      • CONFUCIAN TEMPLE AT TONG-CH'UANFU Where the Author's life was miraculously saved; first temple in which the Author lived. Later, in Tibet, his life was again saved.
      • ANCIENT TIBETAN PRAYER WHEELS The prayer wheel plays an important part in religious observances in Tibet, the ritual often resembling that of the ancient Christian church.
      • WATCH YOUR STEP Picture shows nature of main roads in certain sections of western China; when the rains come, traveling is quite dangerous. Author seen on boulder at right.
      • FAR FROM THE MADDENING THRONG Regimenting the whole village to bid a sad farewell; Samuel Pollard, author's traveling companion on this trip in the wilds, stands under the hat on the right
      • HAPPY FAMILY IN BACKWOODS The Author spent two nights in this crudely-thatched home in the hills. Though poor, the people were extremely hospitable—and invariably happy.
      • PRIMITIVE COAL-MINING IN YÜN-NAN Coal is abundant in many parts of Yün-nan, though production is small and methods of mining very crude. Picture shows tunnel leading underground.
      • These two pictures show (below) the women stripping hemp and (above) weaving it into the picturesque garments they are wearing. They were all dressed up for the occasion. It is surprising what they can do with such primitive appliances. Picture was taken in the hill country beyond Chaotungfu. They are all Hua Miao.
      • HUA MIAO WOMEN AND CHILDREN Basket on woman's back shows general method of transportation in the hilly country inhabited by this fascinating tribe.
      • WASH DAY AMONG THE CHILDREN Scene in the school grounds of the mission at Tongch'uanfu, the "City of the Eastern Streams"—and a very happy little band they are.
      • TWO DAYS OUT FROM YUNGCHANGFU An almost everyday scene in the western part of China—China's "Switzerland"—on the main road from Chung-king to Upper Burma.
      • THE ITINERANT NECROMANCER Predicted the disappearance of the author in five days; was himself found dead in village in three days.
      • COPPER KETTLE LANE IN YÜN-NAN-FU Copper is supposed to be a government monopoly, yet there is always abundance of copper here! One of the most interesting streets in all China.
      • AUTHOR'S CARAVAN FOUR DAYS FROM JOURNEY'S END And a snapshot of the bridge said by Chinese "to be possessed of a demon!"— because it ate up so much money in public subscription, and yet was never in repair!
      • TYPICAL SINGLE-SPAN BRIDGE OF INLAND CHINA. Engineers say that China possesses bridges of more varied design than any other country.
      • Top left—Hua Miao, all men, of North-eastern Yün-nan. Top right—Ch'in Miao, men, of Kwei-chow. Bottom left— Three Heh Miao—all women. Bottom right—Hua Miao—two women have their hair done up in shape of horn to denotes that they are married; others man.
      • A REAL ABORIGINAL FEAST The man on the left scowled in anger as the Author snapped his picture—otherwise, all were happy. For them an exceptional feast, not an everyday affair.
      • WHERE EAST MEETS WEST Playfellows in Far Interior China. The little white girl is the daughter of a missionary in Suifu, Szech'uan, where picture was taken on porch of mission residence.
      • BEAUTIFUL TONG-CH'UANFU IN YÜN-NAN The city in which the Author rested for several months when his right arm was broken; situated between two high ranges, Tongch'uanfu Valley is extremely beautiful.
      • TWO VERY PRACTICAL WOMEN Though their tribes have lived on same range of mountains "for eighty centuries," they speak different languages and lead different life generally. (One carries baby.)
      • IN UNSURVEYED AND LITTLE-TRODDEN YÜN-NAN Picture shows into what a dilapidated condition the roads are allowed to get; off courier roads, this is what you get.
      • IGNORANCE AND POVERTY Characteristic specimens of poor tribes found in wild areas off the beaten path in the province of Yün-nan; their food is rarely above famine conditions.
      • THE TENGYUEH WATERFALL Mountains opposite are about 4,000 feet higher than the Tengyueh Plain, which is about 5,500 feet; over this waterfall one of author's ponies "committed suicide," Chinese said.
      • FAMILY SCENE IN HUA MIAOLAND In many districts of this wild country nothing will grow except corn (maize) and hemp; latter people weave for clothing.
      • REFORMED HUA MIAO STUDENTS TAKING IT EASY Picture shows how much they have benefitted under the missionary's influence. Taken at the British mission compound in Tongch'uanfu.
      • FAR IN THE WILDS OF UNSURVEYED YÜN-NAN Picture gives only a scant idea of the difficulties of negotiating country of this nature. When river is high, there is no bridge. Author on bridge.
    • THE SWITZERLAND OF WESTERN CHINA To travel in China is easy over country like this, granted that the traveler sticks to the main road, sample of which is seen at lower right.
      • RED CROSS WORK IN CHINESE REVOLUTION Red Cross workers at mass graves of men killed during the the Chinese Revolution.
      • TEA FOR FOREIGN COUNTRIES Coolies carrying tea packed for export; picture was taken in British concession of Hankow.
      • TEA FROM NATIVE DISTRICTS Picture shows native tea dealers at Ku-kiang bringing in tea for transport to the great tea factories in Hankow, where it is prepared for export.
      • AUTHOR ON NANKING CITY WALL Taken during the Revolution, when Author was acting as war correspondent for world-wide news agencies.
      • AT HANKOW—THE CHICAGO OF CHINA River-front scene at low water, showing junks that transport general cargo down-river from the exporting districts. This is a typical riverfront scene.
      • A LONELY TRAVELER This picture was taken far out in untraveled China Far West. For days you meet no sign of human habitation, and woe betide you if the river rises!
      • EARNING HIS LIVING This coolie, who carries 420-lb. bale of cotton, as seen in the picture, from the ship in the river to the Hankow Bund, probably earns a dollar and a half per week!
      • TEA FOR FOREIGN LANDS Foreign steamers being loaded with native cargoes for export; scene on the Hankow Bund. The tea trade of China has lost considerable ground in recent years.
      • WILLOW PATTERN TEA HOUSE IN SHANGHAI A famous landmark in the native city; said to be one of the oldest tea-houses in China. Much business is transacted in these tea-houses all over the country.
      • THE PERIGRINATING BARBER OF ANCIENT CHINA If there is an "artist" on this earth, it is the Chinese barber. An hour in his chair makes you long for a week in bed to fully recover!
      • AUTHOR'S HOUSEBOAT (WUPAN) In which he passed eighteen days on the Yangtze-kiang; scene at one of the rapids in upper reaches of river.
      • AUTHOR'S MODEST CARAVAN IN SZECH'UAN And a fine body of men they were, kept in order by the general factotum in the foreground—each of them earning about 25 cents a day.
      • QUAINT CHINESE ORCHESTRA HALWAYS MEN Typical old-time orchestra anywhere in China; the Chinese say, "Once a musician, always a musician"—so it usually runs in the family.
      • SCENE ON THE UPPER YANGTZE Author and the cook on the aft of the houseboat after all the dangerous rapids had been passed. The ropes are made of bamboo. En route to Chung-king.
      • MOTLEY GROUP OF HUA MIAO MENFOLK Picture gives an idea of how the Hua Miao in certain sections are being gradually absorbed by the Chinese; these men are typical tenant farmers of the Nou-su.
      • RATHER A RARE PICTURE OF TRIBES Three tribes are shown: White Bones (left), attending her mistress, a Nou-su aristocrat (Black Bones); the children at the right are Hua Miao.
      • AUTHOR'S CARAVAN ON THE MARCH On the main road west of Chung-king—the Author's four-man chair engaged to "save his face," and his servant's two-man chair, followed by the coolies.
      • THE MEKONG BRIDGE A drop occurs from 8,000 feet to 4,000 feet, and then a climb again over precipitous mountains—very hard going—to 8,000 feet. Shrines are at each end of the handsome suspension bridge.
      • THE AUTHOR IN YÜN-NAN This picture was taken after convalescence in Tong-chu'aniu, just before the journey commenced from that city to British Burma, as seen in the second part of "Across China On Foot."
      • THE UBIQUITOUS WATER CARRIER Drawing the water and hewing the wood are daily chores in China, mostly carried out by women—though this is a picture of a man, a half-wit.
      • THE WELCOME FAMILIAR TEA-HOUSE In many provinces of China, tea-houses, of which this one in Eastern Szech'uan is typical, are to be found about every ten li (3 miles) on the main road.
      • SPECIMEN OF "MAIN ROAD" IN N.E. YÜN-NAN Taken in the little-known part of Western China, far from any of China's "great paved highways"; author is in saddle.
      • THE OLD-FASHIONED SOLDIER All foreign travelers are given an official escort in the interior. This fu-song was a noble warrior! But not a bewilderingly efficient protector! He was a very lazy rascal!
      • FAREWELL TO THE TRAVELER These people had never seen a white man, their faces show that, at farewell after a very pleasant stay among them, they were not altogether broken-hearted to see the author go!
      • CONFUCIAN TEMPLE AT TONG-CH'UANFU Where the Author's life was miraculously saved; first temple in which the Author lived. Later, in Tibet, his life was again saved.
      • ANCIENT TIBETAN PRAYER WHEELS The prayer wheel plays an important part in religious observances in Tibet, the ritual often resembling that of the ancient Christian church.
      • WATCH YOUR STEP Picture shows nature of main roads in certain sections of western China; when the rains come, traveling is quite dangerous. Author seen on boulder at right.
      • FAR FROM THE MADDENING THRONG Regimenting the whole village to bid a sad farewell; Samuel Pollard, author's traveling companion on this trip in the wilds, stands under the hat on the right
      • HAPPY FAMILY IN BACKWOODS The Author spent two nights in this crudely-thatched home in the hills. Though poor, the people were extremely hospitable—and invariably happy.
      • PRIMITIVE COAL-MINING IN YÜN-NAN Coal is abundant in many parts of Yün-nan, though production is small and methods of mining very crude. Picture shows tunnel leading underground.
      • These two pictures show (below) the women stripping hemp and (above) weaving it into the picturesque garments they are wearing. They were all dressed up for the occasion. It is surprising what they can do with such primitive appliances. Picture was taken in the hill country beyond Chaotungfu. They are all Hua Miao.
      • HUA MIAO WOMEN AND CHILDREN Basket on woman's back shows general method of transportation in the hilly country inhabited by this fascinating tribe.
      • WASH DAY AMONG THE CHILDREN Scene in the school grounds of the mission at Tongch'uanfu, the "City of the Eastern Streams"—and a very happy little band they are.
      • TWO DAYS OUT FROM YUNGCHANGFU An almost everyday scene in the western part of China—China's "Switzerland"—on the main road from Chung-king to Upper Burma.
      • THE ITINERANT NECROMANCER Predicted the disappearance of the author in five days; was himself found dead in village in three days.
      • COPPER KETTLE LANE IN YÜN-NAN-FU Copper is supposed to be a government monopoly, yet there is always abundance of copper here! One of the most interesting streets in all China.
      • AUTHOR'S CARAVAN FOUR DAYS FROM JOURNEY'S END And a snapshot of the bridge said by Chinese "to be possessed of a demon!"— because it ate up so much money in public subscription, and yet was never in repair!
      • TYPICAL SINGLE-SPAN BRIDGE OF INLAND CHINA. Engineers say that China possesses bridges of more varied design than any other country.
      • Top left—Hua Miao, all men, of North-eastern Yün-nan. Top right—Ch'in Miao, men, of Kwei-chow. Bottom left— Three Heh Miao—all women. Bottom right—Hua Miao—two women have their hair done up in shape of horn to denotes that they are married; others man.
      • A REAL ABORIGINAL FEAST The man on the left scowled in anger as the Author snapped his picture—otherwise, all were happy. For them an exceptional feast, not an everyday affair.
      • WHERE EAST MEETS WEST Playfellows in Far Interior China. The little white girl is the daughter of a missionary in Suifu, Szech'uan, where picture was taken on porch of mission residence.
      • BEAUTIFUL TONG-CH'UANFU IN YÜN-NAN The city in which the Author rested for several months when his right arm was broken; situated between two high ranges, Tongch'uanfu Valley is extremely beautiful.
      • TWO VERY PRACTICAL WOMEN Though their tribes have lived on same range of mountains "for eighty centuries," they speak different languages and lead different life generally. (One carries baby.)
      • IN UNSURVEYED AND LITTLE-TRODDEN YÜN-NAN Picture shows into what a dilapidated condition the roads are allowed to get; off courier roads, this is what you get.
      • IGNORANCE AND POVERTY Characteristic specimens of poor tribes found in wild areas off the beaten path in the province of Yün-nan; their food is rarely above famine conditions.
      • THE TENGYUEH WATERFALL Mountains opposite are about 4,000 feet higher than the Tengyueh Plain, which is about 5,500 feet; over this waterfall one of author's ponies "committed suicide," Chinese said.
      • FAMILY SCENE IN HUA MIAOLAND In many districts of this wild country nothing will grow except corn (maize) and hemp; latter people weave for clothing.
      • REFORMED HUA MIAO STUDENTS TAKING IT EASY Picture shows how much they have benefitted under the missionary's influence. Taken at the British mission compound in Tongch'uanfu.
      • FAR IN THE WILDS OF UNSURVEYED YÜN-NAN Picture gives only a scant idea of the difficulties of negotiating country of this nature. When river is high, there is no bridge. Author on bridge.
    • RED CROSS WORK IN CHINESE REVOLUTION Red Cross workers at mass graves of men killed during the the Chinese Revolution.
    • TEA FOR FOREIGN COUNTRIES Coolies carrying tea packed for export; picture was taken in British concession of Hankow.
    • TEA FROM NATIVE DISTRICTS Picture shows native tea dealers at Ku-kiang bringing in tea for transport to the great tea factories in Hankow, where it is prepared for export.
    • AUTHOR ON NANKING CITY WALL Taken during the Revolution, when Author was acting as war correspondent for world-wide news agencies.
    • AT HANKOW—THE CHICAGO OF CHINA River-front scene at low water, showing junks that transport general cargo down-river from the exporting districts. This is a typical riverfront scene.
    • A LONELY TRAVELER This picture was taken far out in untraveled China Far West. For days you meet no sign of human habitation, and woe betide you if the river rises!
    • EARNING HIS LIVING This coolie, who carries 420-lb. bale of cotton, as seen in the picture, from the ship in the river to the Hankow Bund, probably earns a dollar and a half per week!
    • TEA FOR FOREIGN LANDS Foreign steamers being loaded with native cargoes for export; scene on the Hankow Bund. The tea trade of China has lost considerable ground in recent years.
    • WILLOW PATTERN TEA HOUSE IN SHANGHAI A famous landmark in the native city; said to be one of the oldest tea-houses in China. Much business is transacted in these tea-houses all over the country.
    • THE PERIGRINATING BARBER OF ANCIENT CHINA If there is an "artist" on this earth, it is the Chinese barber. An hour in his chair makes you long for a week in bed to fully recover!
    • AUTHOR'S HOUSEBOAT (WUPAN) In which he passed eighteen days on the Yangtze-kiang; scene at one of the rapids in upper reaches of river.
    • AUTHOR'S MODEST CARAVAN IN SZECH'UAN And a fine body of men they were, kept in order by the general factotum in the foreground—each of them earning about 25 cents a day.
    • QUAINT CHINESE ORCHESTRA HALWAYS MEN Typical old-time orchestra anywhere in China; the Chinese say, "Once a musician, always a musician"—so it usually runs in the family.
    • SCENE ON THE UPPER YANGTZE Author and the cook on the aft of the houseboat after all the dangerous rapids had been passed. The ropes are made of bamboo. En route to Chung-king.
    • MOTLEY GROUP OF HUA MIAO MENFOLK Picture gives an idea of how the Hua Miao in certain sections are being gradually absorbed by the Chinese; these men are typical tenant farmers of the Nou-su.
    • RATHER A RARE PICTURE OF TRIBES Three tribes are shown: White Bones (left), attending her mistress, a Nou-su aristocrat (Black Bones); the children at the right are Hua Miao.
    • AUTHOR'S CARAVAN ON THE MARCH On the main road west of Chung-king—the Author's four-man chair engaged to "save his face," and his servant's two-man chair, followed by the coolies.
    • THE MEKONG BRIDGE A drop occurs from 8,000 feet to 4,000 feet, and then a climb again over precipitous mountains—very hard going—to 8,000 feet. Shrines are at each end of the handsome suspension bridge.
    • THE AUTHOR IN YÜN-NAN This picture was taken after convalescence in Tong-chu'aniu, just before the journey commenced from that city to British Burma, as seen in the second part of "Across China On Foot."
    • THE UBIQUITOUS WATER CARRIER Drawing the water and hewing the wood are daily chores in China, mostly carried out by women—though this is a picture of a man, a half-wit.
    • THE WELCOME FAMILIAR TEA-HOUSE In many provinces of China, tea-houses, of which this one in Eastern Szech'uan is typical, are to be found about every ten li (3 miles) on the main road.
    • SPECIMEN OF "MAIN ROAD" IN N.E. YÜN-NAN Taken in the little-known part of Western China, far from any of China's "great paved highways"; author is in saddle.
    • THE OLD-FASHIONED SOLDIER All foreign travelers are given an official escort in the interior. This fu-song was a noble warrior! But not a bewilderingly efficient protector! He was a very lazy rascal!
    • FAREWELL TO THE TRAVELER These people had never seen a white man, their faces show that, at farewell after a very pleasant stay among them, they were not altogether broken-hearted to see the author go!
    • CONFUCIAN TEMPLE AT TONG-CH'UANFU Where the Author's life was miraculously saved; first temple in which the Author lived. Later, in Tibet, his life was again saved.
    • ANCIENT TIBETAN PRAYER WHEELS The prayer wheel plays an important part in religious observances in Tibet, the ritual often resembling that of the ancient Christian church.
    • WATCH YOUR STEP Picture shows nature of main roads in certain sections of western China; when the rains come, traveling is quite dangerous. Author seen on boulder at right.
    • FAR FROM THE MADDENING THRONG Regimenting the whole village to bid a sad farewell; Samuel Pollard, author's traveling companion on this trip in the wilds, stands under the hat on the right
    • HAPPY FAMILY IN BACKWOODS The Author spent two nights in this crudely-thatched home in the hills. Though poor, the people were extremely hospitable—and invariably happy.
    • PRIMITIVE COAL-MINING IN YÜN-NAN Coal is abundant in many parts of Yün-nan, though production is small and methods of mining very crude. Picture shows tunnel leading underground.
    • These two pictures show (below) the women stripping hemp and (above) weaving it into the picturesque garments they are wearing. They were all dressed up for the occasion. It is surprising what they can do with such primitive appliances. Picture was taken in the hill country beyond Chaotungfu. They are all Hua Miao.
    • HUA MIAO WOMEN AND CHILDREN Basket on woman's back shows general method of transportation in the hilly country inhabited by this fascinating tribe.
    • WASH DAY AMONG THE CHILDREN Scene in the school grounds of the mission at Tongch'uanfu, the "City of the Eastern Streams"—and a very happy little band they are.
    • TWO DAYS OUT FROM YUNGCHANGFU An almost everyday scene in the western part of China—China's "Switzerland"—on the main road from Chung-king to Upper Burma.
    • THE ITINERANT NECROMANCER Predicted the disappearance of the author in five days; was himself found dead in village in three days.
    • COPPER KETTLE LANE IN YÜN-NAN-FU Copper is supposed to be a government monopoly, yet there is always abundance of copper here! One of the most interesting streets in all China.
    • AUTHOR'S CARAVAN FOUR DAYS FROM JOURNEY'S END And a snapshot of the bridge said by Chinese "to be possessed of a demon!"— because it ate up so much money in public subscription, and yet was never in repair!
    • TYPICAL SINGLE-SPAN BRIDGE OF INLAND CHINA. Engineers say that China possesses bridges of more varied design than any other country.
    • Top left—Hua Miao, all men, of North-eastern Yün-nan. Top right—Ch'in Miao, men, of Kwei-chow. Bottom left— Three Heh Miao—all women. Bottom right—Hua Miao—two women have their hair done up in shape of horn to denotes that they are married; others man.
    • A REAL ABORIGINAL FEAST The man on the left scowled in anger as the Author snapped his picture—otherwise, all were happy. For them an exceptional feast, not an everyday affair.
    • WHERE EAST MEETS WEST Playfellows in Far Interior China. The little white girl is the daughter of a missionary in Suifu, Szech'uan, where picture was taken on porch of mission residence.
    • BEAUTIFUL TONG-CH'UANFU IN YÜN-NAN The city in which the Author rested for several months when his right arm was broken; situated between two high ranges, Tongch'uanfu Valley is extremely beautiful.
    • TWO VERY PRACTICAL WOMEN Though their tribes have lived on same range of mountains "for eighty centuries," they speak different languages and lead different life generally. (One carries baby.)
    • IN UNSURVEYED AND LITTLE-TRODDEN YÜN-NAN Picture shows into what a dilapidated condition the roads are allowed to get; off courier roads, this is what you get.
    • IGNORANCE AND POVERTY Characteristic specimens of poor tribes found in wild areas off the beaten path in the province of Yün-nan; their food is rarely above famine conditions.
    • THE TENGYUEH WATERFALL Mountains opposite are about 4,000 feet higher than the Tengyueh Plain, which is about 5,500 feet; over this waterfall one of author's ponies "committed suicide," Chinese said.
    • FAMILY SCENE IN HUA MIAOLAND In many districts of this wild country nothing will grow except corn (maize) and hemp; latter people weave for clothing.
    • REFORMED HUA MIAO STUDENTS TAKING IT EASY Picture shows how much they have benefitted under the missionary's influence. Taken at the British mission compound in Tongch'uanfu.
    • FAR IN THE WILDS OF UNSURVEYED YÜN-NAN Picture gives only a scant idea of the difficulties of negotiating country of this nature. When river is high, there is no bridge. Author on bridge.
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