Afar in the Forest
Free

Afar in the Forest

By William Henry Giles Kingston
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • W.H.G. Kingston
  • "Afar in the Forest"
    • Chapter One.
      • Our habitation in the forest—My share of the spoils of the day’s chase—Uncle Mark commences his narrative—Why my uncles decided to emigrate—Landing in safety, they start up country—Their meeting with Simon Yearsley, an old settler—The settlement is found in ruins—Lily and I rescued—Uncle Mark promises to resume his narrative on the first opportunity—My love of natural history—Uncle Mark continues his narrative—Yearsley goes in pursuit of the indians—The burial of Lily’s mother—The return to the waggon—They reach the nearest settlement—Alarm of the settlers upon hearing of the outrage committed by the indians—Uncle Stephen’s marriage—Conclusion of Uncle Mark’s narrative—Lily and I go berrying—We are attacked by a wolf—Kepenau saves our lives—His present of venison to Aunt Hannah—Kepenau’s belief in the goodness of the Great Spirit—The Indian’s advice.
    • Our habitation in the forest—My share of the spoils of the day’s chase—Uncle Mark commences his narrative—Why my uncles decided to emigrate—Landing in safety, they start up country—Their meeting with Simon Yearsley, an old settler—The settlement is found in ruins—Lily and I rescued—Uncle Mark promises to resume his narrative on the first opportunity—My love of natural history—Uncle Mark continues his narrative—Yearsley goes in pursuit of the indians—The burial of Lily’s mother—The return to the waggon—They reach the nearest settlement—Alarm of the settlers upon hearing of the outrage committed by the indians—Uncle Stephen’s marriage—Conclusion of Uncle Mark’s narrative—Lily and I go berrying—We are attacked by a wolf—Kepenau saves our lives—His present of venison to Aunt Hannah—Kepenau’s belief in the goodness of the Great Spirit—The Indian’s advice.
    • Chapter Two.
      • Greenford settlement—The flying squirrels—Mike Laffan and Tom Quambo—Their dogs, Yelp and Snap—A raccoon-hunt—Mike having seen a bear, we go in chase—Our dogs scent Bruin—Quambo in danger—The bear is killed, and Quambo released—We return to the hut—The logging bee—Uncle Stephen’s house—Indian summer—Mike Laffan’s Cremona—The night attack of the wolves—We determine to go lumbering for the winter—Mike and I go on ahead—Uncle Mark is attacked by a wolf—Mike saves him, and we proceed onwards.
    • Greenford settlement—The flying squirrels—Mike Laffan and Tom Quambo—Their dogs, Yelp and Snap—A raccoon-hunt—Mike having seen a bear, we go in chase—Our dogs scent Bruin—Quambo in danger—The bear is killed, and Quambo released—We return to the hut—The logging bee—Uncle Stephen’s house—Indian summer—Mike Laffan’s Cremona—The night attack of the wolves—We determine to go lumbering for the winter—Mike and I go on ahead—Uncle Mark is attacked by a wolf—Mike saves him, and we proceed onwards.
    • Chapter Three.
      • A terrific snowstorm—Kepenau’s timely appearance—We visit Kepenau’s camp—His hospitality—An Indian’s dread of the “fire water”—We bid adieu to our Indian friends—Our arrival at the logging encampment—Jacques Michaud takes a fancy to Mike—Jacques’ raft story—My uncle and I start on our return—We are attacked by a fierce pack of wolves, and are saved by Kepenau and his men—Mike Laffan in a difficulty—We rescue him—Ashatea, Kepenau’s daughter—My visit to Lily—Mr and Mrs Claxton—Dora and Reuben—Reuben visits our hut—The marten and porcupine—An opossum-hunt.
    • A terrific snowstorm—Kepenau’s timely appearance—We visit Kepenau’s camp—His hospitality—An Indian’s dread of the “fire water”—We bid adieu to our Indian friends—Our arrival at the logging encampment—Jacques Michaud takes a fancy to Mike—Jacques’ raft story—My uncle and I start on our return—We are attacked by a fierce pack of wolves, and are saved by Kepenau and his men—Mike Laffan in a difficulty—We rescue him—Ashatea, Kepenau’s daughter—My visit to Lily—Mr and Mrs Claxton—Dora and Reuben—Reuben visits our hut—The marten and porcupine—An opossum-hunt.
    • Chapter Four.
      • Uncle Mark’s good opinion of Reuben—Mike Laffan’s fiddle—The beaver—Reuben’s desire to turn trapper—Quambo takes a pipe—Kepenau’s canoe—Ashatea paddles Reuben home—Kepenau’s sagacity—Uncle Mark welcomes Kepenau and his daughter—The old trapper—Reuben carries Samson’s pack—Ashatea is taught English by Lily and Dora—Martin Godfrey’s visit to the settlement—Kepenau’s and Ashatea’s departure—Sandy McColl, the half-breed—A visit to Kepenau—Portaging.
    • Uncle Mark’s good opinion of Reuben—Mike Laffan’s fiddle—The beaver—Reuben’s desire to turn trapper—Quambo takes a pipe—Kepenau’s canoe—Ashatea paddles Reuben home—Kepenau’s sagacity—Uncle Mark welcomes Kepenau and his daughter—The old trapper—Reuben carries Samson’s pack—Ashatea is taught English by Lily and Dora—Martin Godfrey’s visit to the settlement—Kepenau’s and Ashatea’s departure—Sandy McColl, the half-breed—A visit to Kepenau—Portaging.
    • Chapter Five.
      • An intruder—We arrive at Kepenau’s camp—Ashatea inquires kindly after Lily and Dora—Deer-hunting—The strange Indians—Kepenau’s precautions—Mike amuses the camp with his fiddle—Our farewell—Kakaik’s advice with regard to rapid-shooting—The treacherous Indian on shore—Mike and I paddle desperately—The canoe is upset—Carried down the stream—A natural place of concealment in a hollow trunk—My terror on perceiving the Indians—Forced by hunger to leave my concealment, I am taken prisoner by four Indians.
    • An intruder—We arrive at Kepenau’s camp—Ashatea inquires kindly after Lily and Dora—Deer-hunting—The strange Indians—Kepenau’s precautions—Mike amuses the camp with his fiddle—Our farewell—Kakaik’s advice with regard to rapid-shooting—The treacherous Indian on shore—Mike and I paddle desperately—The canoe is upset—Carried down the stream—A natural place of concealment in a hollow trunk—My terror on perceiving the Indians—Forced by hunger to leave my concealment, I am taken prisoner by four Indians.
    • Chapter Six.
      • My Indian captors commence their homeward journey—Arrival at the camp—Aguskogaut the chief—His kindness to me—My astonishment on seeing Mike a prisoner—His ludicrous fiddling—His comical account of his capture—Return of the warriors from the war-path—Mike and I join the buffalo-hunters—The herd—Exciting sport—The bison—Its importance to the Indians—My hope of escape—I am in great danger from the herd—Mike rescues me—Our return to camp.
    • My Indian captors commence their homeward journey—Arrival at the camp—Aguskogaut the chief—His kindness to me—My astonishment on seeing Mike a prisoner—His ludicrous fiddling—His comical account of his capture—Return of the warriors from the war-path—Mike and I join the buffalo-hunters—The herd—Exciting sport—The bison—Its importance to the Indians—My hope of escape—I am in great danger from the herd—Mike rescues me—Our return to camp.
    • Chapter Seven.
      • Mike’s precaution—We again go buffalo-hunting—The prairie on fire—A ride for life—Our escape from the fire and the Indians—Hobbling horses—The fire is stopped by the river—A brief sleep—Our fishing tackle—Mike catches a cat-fish—Our lean-to—Mike loses his book—The visit of Bruin—A hearty meal—Death of Mike’s horse—I am taken sick—Mike’s careful watch—My horse is drowned—Our visit to the rice-Lake—We find Lily and Dora there, with Ashatea, in a canoe, gathering rice—Lily’s account of Manilick, the young chief, Ashatea’s lover—Kepenau’s address—Again taken ill—How I recover.
    • Mike’s precaution—We again go buffalo-hunting—The prairie on fire—A ride for life—Our escape from the fire and the Indians—Hobbling horses—The fire is stopped by the river—A brief sleep—Our fishing tackle—Mike catches a cat-fish—Our lean-to—Mike loses his book—The visit of Bruin—A hearty meal—Death of Mike’s horse—I am taken sick—Mike’s careful watch—My horse is drowned—Our visit to the rice-Lake—We find Lily and Dora there, with Ashatea, in a canoe, gathering rice—Lily’s account of Manilick, the young chief, Ashatea’s lover—Kepenau’s address—Again taken ill—How I recover.
    • Chapter Eight.
      • Uncle Mark’s canoe—Our start for home—The rattlesnakes—Mike longs for his fiddle—Our night encampment—Jacques Lerocque’s fishing joke—Mike’s terror at the supposed Indian ambuscade—The phantom bear—Our arrival at home—Kakaik and the fiddle—Mike’s delight—Kepenau’s second visit—Reuben’s chagrin—Mr Simon Spark’s advent—His glowing description of the far north-west—The forest on fire—Our hut destroyed—Our escape.
    • Uncle Mark’s canoe—Our start for home—The rattlesnakes—Mike longs for his fiddle—Our night encampment—Jacques Lerocque’s fishing joke—Mike’s terror at the supposed Indian ambuscade—The phantom bear—Our arrival at home—Kakaik and the fiddle—Mike’s delight—Kepenau’s second visit—Reuben’s chagrin—Mr Simon Spark’s advent—His glowing description of the far north-west—The forest on fire—Our hut destroyed—Our escape.
    • Chapter Nine.
      • The settlers determine to accept Mr Sparks’ offers—Lily’s sorrow at leaving the old settlement—Mode of advance—Sabbath observance on the march—We are left behind, in consequence of our waggon breaking down—Our great want of water—A dangerous descent—The horrid spectacle of the wolves—Our oxen flagging, I proceed forward alone in the direction of a fire in the distance—My joy upon discovering our friends—Reuben offers to accompany me back—We get lost—Faithful Mike finds us—Strange horsemen—Mike, Reuben, and I taken prisoners by the Sioux.
    • The settlers determine to accept Mr Sparks’ offers—Lily’s sorrow at leaving the old settlement—Mode of advance—Sabbath observance on the march—We are left behind, in consequence of our waggon breaking down—Our great want of water—A dangerous descent—The horrid spectacle of the wolves—Our oxen flagging, I proceed forward alone in the direction of a fire in the distance—My joy upon discovering our friends—Reuben offers to accompany me back—We get lost—Faithful Mike finds us—Strange horsemen—Mike, Reuben, and I taken prisoners by the Sioux.
    • Chapter Ten.
      • My sprained ankle—Mike’s devotion—Reuben brought to the camp—The Indians bind us to trees—The debate on our fate—I am released by Sandy McColl—Old Samson again—The secret cavern—Samson is very kind and attentive to me—His close attention to my account of the burning of the settlement, and the rescue of Lily and me when children—I recover, and Samson and I leave the cavern to reconnoitre—The Indian massacre—Sandy, Reuben, and Mike are hotly pursued—Our fortress besieged—We hold out, and beat off our besiegers—Our start—The elk.
    • My sprained ankle—Mike’s devotion—Reuben brought to the camp—The Indians bind us to trees—The debate on our fate—I am released by Sandy McColl—Old Samson again—The secret cavern—Samson is very kind and attentive to me—His close attention to my account of the burning of the settlement, and the rescue of Lily and me when children—I recover, and Samson and I leave the cavern to reconnoitre—The Indian massacre—Sandy, Reuben, and Mike are hotly pursued—Our fortress besieged—We hold out, and beat off our besiegers—Our start—The elk.
    • Chapter Eleven.
      • Samson’s advice about buffalo-hunting—I see buffalo in the distance—Overtaken by a terrific storm—Benighted on the plain—Hunger-stricken, I allow my horse to take his own way—I swoon away—The Spaniards find me—Pablo, the cook—The prairie on fire—Indians approaching, I dash through the flames—My poor horse is frightfully scorched—The wolves in pursuit—I take refuge in a tree—My horse is devoured by the wolves—The wolves depart in chase of buffalo—I descend, and eat the loathsome wolf-flesh in my hunger—Lighting a fire, I camp for the night—Shooting a beaver.
    • Samson’s advice about buffalo-hunting—I see buffalo in the distance—Overtaken by a terrific storm—Benighted on the plain—Hunger-stricken, I allow my horse to take his own way—I swoon away—The Spaniards find me—Pablo, the cook—The prairie on fire—Indians approaching, I dash through the flames—My poor horse is frightfully scorched—The wolves in pursuit—I take refuge in a tree—My horse is devoured by the wolves—The wolves depart in chase of buffalo—I descend, and eat the loathsome wolf-flesh in my hunger—Lighting a fire, I camp for the night—Shooting a beaver.
    • Chapter Twelve.
      • I find poor Pablo, and assist him—Roasted squirrel—Pablo’s reason for desiring to join the English—We stalk a buffalo—Pablo’s terror at the approach of Indians—My surprise at being welcomed by Manilick—Mike’s joy at seeing me alive—We again start in the direction of the waggon-train—Old Samson, Reuben, and Sandy nearly roasted alive by the Apaches—Quambo’s care of “de fiddle”—Lily’s relationship to Old Samson—Kepenau and Manilick—Conclusion.
    • I find poor Pablo, and assist him—Roasted squirrel—Pablo’s reason for desiring to join the English—We stalk a buffalo—Pablo’s terror at the approach of Indians—My surprise at being welcomed by Manilick—Mike’s joy at seeing me alive—We again start in the direction of the waggon-train—Old Samson, Reuben, and Sandy nearly roasted alive by the Apaches—Quambo’s care of “de fiddle”—Lily’s relationship to Old Samson—Kepenau and Manilick—Conclusion.
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