The Easiest Way Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911
Free

The Easiest Way Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911

By Eugene Walter
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • THE EASIEST WAY
  • EUGENE WALTER
  • DAVID BELASCO'S STUYVESANT THEATRE
    • CHARACTERS OF THE PLAY
      • PROGRAM CONTINUED.
    • PROGRAM CONTINUED.
  • THE EASIEST WAY
  • CHARACTERS.
  • DESCRIPTION OF CHARACTERS.
  • SYNOPSIS.
    • ACT I. Mrs. Williams' Ranch House or Country Home, perched on the side of Ute Pass, near Colorado Springs, Colorado.
      • ACT II. Laura Murdock's furnished Room, second story back, New York.
      • ACT III. Laura Murdock's Apartments in an expensive Hotel.
      • ACT IV. Laura Murdock's Apartments. The same as Act III.
    • ACT II. Laura Murdock's furnished Room, second story back, New York.
    • ACT III. Laura Murdock's Apartments in an expensive Hotel.
    • ACT IV. Laura Murdock's Apartments. The same as Act III.
  • THE EASIEST WAY
    • SCENE. The scene is that of the summer country ranch house of MRS. WILLIAMS, a friend of LAURA MURDOCK'S, and a prominent society woman of Denver, perched on the side of Ute Pass, near Colorado Springs. The house is one of unusual pretentiousness, and, to a person not conversant with conditions as they exist in this part of Colorado, the idea might be that such magnificence could not obtain in such a locality. At the left of stage the house rises in the form of a turret, built of rough stone of a brown hue, two stories high, and projecting a quarter of the way out on the stage. The door leads to a small elliptical terrace built of stone, with heavy benches of Greek design, strewn cushions, while over the top of one part of this terrace is suspended a canopy made from a Navajo blanket. The terrace is supposed to extend almost to the right of stage, and here it stops. The stage must be cut here so that the entrance of JOHN can give the illusion that he is coming up a steep declivity or a long flight of stairs. There are chairs at right and left, and a small table at left. There are trailing vines around the balustrade of the terrace, and the whole setting must convey the idea of quiet wealth. Up stage is supposed to be the part of the terrace overlooking the cañon, a sheer drop of two thousand feet, while over in the distance, as if across the cañon, one can see the rolling foot-hills and lofty peaks of the Rockies, with Pike's Peak in the distance, snow-capped and colossal. It is late in the afternoon, and, as the scene progresses, the quick twilight of a cañon, beautiful in its tints of purple and amber, becomes later pitch black, and the curtain goes down on an absolutely black stage. The cyclorama, or semi-cyclorama, must give the perspective of greater distances, and be so painted that the various tints of twilight may be shown.
  • ACT II.
    • SCENE. Six months have elapsed. The furnished room of LAURA MURDOCK, second story back of an ordinary, cheap theatrical lodging-house in the theatre district of New York. The house is evidently of a type of the old-fashioned brown-stone front, with high ceilings, dingy walls, and long, rather insecure windows. The woodwork is depressingly dark. The ceiling is cracked, the paper is old and spotted and in places loose. There is a door leading to the hallway. There is a large old-fashioned wardrobe in which are hung a few old clothes, most of them a good deal worn and shabby, showing that the owner—LAURA MURDOCK—has had a rather hard time of it since leaving Colorado in the first act. The doors of this wardrobe must be equipped with springs so they will open outward, and also furnished with wires so they can be controlled from the back. This is absolutely necessary, owing to "business" which is done during the progress of the act. The drawer in the bottom of the wardrobe is open at rise. This is filled with a lot of rumpled, tissue-paper and other rubbish. An old pair of shoes is seen at the upper end of the wardrobe on the floor. There is an armchair over which is thrown an ordinary kimono, and on top of the wardrobe are a number of magazines and old books, and an unused parasol wrapped up in tissue paper.
  • ACT III.
    • SCENE. Two months have elapsed. The scene is at BROCKTON'S apartment in a hotel such as is not over particular concerning the relations of its tenants. There are a number of these hotels throughout the theatre district of New York, and, as a rule, one will find them usually of the same type. The room in which this scene is placed is that of the general living-room in one of the handsomest apartments in the building. The prevailing colour is green, and there is nothing particularly gaudy about the general furnishings. They are in good taste, but without the variety of arrangement and ornamentation which would naturally obtain in a room occupied by people a bit more particular concerning their surroundings. Down stage is a table about three feet square which can be used not only as a general centre-table, but also for service while the occupants are eating. There is a breakfast service on this table, and also a tray and stand behind it. There is a chair at either side of the table, and at right coming up stage, the room turns at a sharp angle of thirty-five degrees, and this space is largely taken up by a large doorway. This is equipped with sliding-doors and hung with green portières, which are handsome and in harmony with the general scheme of the furnishings of the room. This entrance is to the sleeping-room of the apartments.
  • ACT IV.
    • SCENE. The same scene as Act III. It is about two o'clock in the afternoon.
      • END OF THE PLAY.
    • END OF THE PLAY.
    • *** START: FULL LICENSE ***
      • Section 1. General Terms of Use and Redistributing Project Gutenberg-tm electronic works
      • Section 2. Information about the Mission of Project Gutenberg-tm
      • Section 3. Information about the Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation
      • Section 4. Information about Donations to the Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation
      • Section 5. General Information About Project Gutenberg-tm electronic works.
    • Section 1. General Terms of Use and Redistributing Project Gutenberg-tm electronic works
    • Section 2. Information about the Mission of Project Gutenberg-tm
    • Section 3. Information about the Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation
    • Section 4. Information about Donations to the Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation
    • Section 5. General Information About Project Gutenberg-tm electronic works.
    No review for this book yet, be the first to review.
      No comment for this book yet, be the first to comment
      You May Also Like
      The Easiest Way: A Story of Metropolitan Life
      Free
      The Easiest Way: A Story of Metropolitan Life
      By Arthur Hornblow, Eugene Walter
      A Synopsis of the American Bats of the Genus Pipistrellus
      Free
      A Synopsis of the American Bats of the Genus Pipistrellus
      By Walter Woelber Dalquest, E. Raymond (Eugene Raymond) Hall
      A New Bat (Genus Myotis) From Mexico
      Free
      A New Bat (Genus Myotis) From Mexico
      By E. Raymond (Eugene Raymond) Hall, Walter Woelber Dalquest
      Pipistrellus cinnamomeus Miller 1902 Referred to the Genus Myotis
      Free
      Pipistrellus cinnamomeus Miller 1902 Referred to the Genus Myotis
      By Walter Woelber Dalquest, E. Raymond (Eugene Raymond) Hall
      A New Doglike Carnivore, Genus Cynarctus, From the Clarendonian, Pliocene, of Texas
      Free
      A New Doglike Carnivore, Genus Cynarctus, From the Clarendonian, Pliocene, of Texas
      By Walter Woelber Dalquest, E. Raymond (Eugene Raymond) Hall
      Tadarida femorosacca (Merriam) in Tamaulipas, Mexico
      Free
      Tadarida femorosacca (Merriam) in Tamaulipas, Mexico
      By Walter Woelber Dalquest, E. Raymond (Eugene Raymond) Hall
      Also Available On
      Categories
      Curated Lists