Expository Writing
Free

Expository Writing

By Mervin James Curl
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • EXPOSITORY WRITING
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • CONTENTS
  • CHAPTER I THE NATURE AND MATERIAL OF EXPOSITION
  • CHAPTER II HOW TO WRITE EXPOSITION
    • The Problem
    • The Controlling Purpose
    • Source of the Controlling Purpose
      • a. The Subject itself
      • b. The Writer's Attitude
      • c. The Reader
      • d. Relative Value of Sources
    • a. The Subject itself
    • b. The Writer's Attitude
    • c. The Reader
    • d. Relative Value of Sources
    • The Controlling Purpose and the Emotional Reaction
      • "SOLEMN-LOOKING BLOKES"[5]
    • "SOLEMN-LOOKING BLOKES"[5]
    • Proper Use of the Controlling Purpose
    • Practical Use of the Controlling Purpose
      • Selection of Material
      • The Ordering of the Material
      • AN IDYL OF THE HONEY-BEE[7]
      • PULVIS ET UMBRA[8]
    • Selection of Material
    • The Ordering of the Material
    • AN IDYL OF THE HONEY-BEE[7]
    • PULVIS ET UMBRA[8]
    • OUTLINES
      • The Value of Outlines
      • The Form of the Outline
      • First Outline of "An Idyl of the Honey-Bee"
      • Second Outline of "An Idyl of the Honey-Bee"
    • The Value of Outlines
    • The Form of the Outline
    • First Outline of "An Idyl of the Honey-Bee"
    • Second Outline of "An Idyl of the Honey-Bee"
    • EXERCISES
  • CHAPTER III DEFINITION
    • The Process of Definition
    • The Two Main Classes of Definitions
    • General Cautions
    • Methods of Defining
      • a. The Method of Illustration
      • b. The Method of Comparison or Contrast
      • c. The Method of Division
      • d. The Method of Repetition
      • e. The Method of Elimination
      • f. The Method of Showing Origin, Cause, Effect
    • a. The Method of Illustration
    • b. The Method of Comparison or Contrast
    • c. The Method of Division
    • d. The Method of Repetition
    • e. The Method of Elimination
    • f. The Method of Showing Origin, Cause, Effect
    • EXERCISES
  • CHAPTER IV ANALYSIS
    • The Two Classes of Analysis
    • Formal Analysis
    • Informal Analysis
    • Kinds of Informal Analysis
      • a. Enumeration
      • b. Equation
      • c. Statement of Significance
      • d. Relationship
      • e. Statement of a Problem
    • a. Enumeration
    • b. Equation
    • c. Statement of Significance
    • d. Relationship
    • e. Statement of a Problem
    • Principles of Analysis
    • EXERCISES
  • CHAPTER V MECHANISMS, PROCESSES, AND ORGANIZATIONS
    • General Cautions
    • Centralization
    • Processes
    • Mechanisms
    • Organizations
    • Aids in Gaining Clearness
    • Aids in Gaining Interest
      • THE PERFECT AUTOMATIC CARPET-LAYER
    • THE PERFECT AUTOMATIC CARPET-LAYER
    • EXERCISES
  • CHAPTER VI CRITICISM
    • Requirements demanded of the Critic
      • a. Ability to analyze
      • b. Knowledge of the General Field
      • c. Common Sense
      • d. Open-mindedness
    • a. Ability to analyze
    • b. Knowledge of the General Field
    • c. Common Sense
    • d. Open-mindedness
    • Methods of Criticism
      • a. The Historical Method
      • b. The Method by Standards
      • c. The Appreciative Method
    • a. The Historical Method
    • b. The Method by Standards
    • c. The Appreciative Method
    • Practical Helps
    • EXERCISES
  • CHAPTER VII THE INFORMAL ESSAY
    • THE PRIVILEGES OF AGE[87]
    • A BREATH OF APRIL[88]
    • THE AMATEUR CHESSMAN[89]
    • PEOPLE
    • THINGS
    • NATURE
  • CHAPTER VIII EXPOSITORY BIOGRAPHY
    • The Problem
    • The Chief Aid in Solving the Problem
    • The Process of Solving the Problem
      • 1. Defining the Character
      • 2. Analyzing the Character
    • 1. Defining the Character
    • 2. Analyzing the Character
    • The Use of Events in the Life
      • a. Choice of Events
      • b. Relation of Events to Personality
      • c. Relation to Society and Times
      • d. Rhetorical Value of Events
    • a. Choice of Events
    • b. Relation of Events to Personality
    • c. Relation to Society and Times
    • d. Rhetorical Value of Events
    • The Problem of Telling the Truth
    • The Danger of Making a "Lesson"
    • The Rhetorical Form
      • OLIVER GOLDSMITH[100]
    • OLIVER GOLDSMITH[100]
    • EXERCISES
  • CHAPTER IX THE GATHERING OF MATERIAL FOR WRITING
  • INDEX OF ILLUSTRATIVE SELECTIONS
  • INDEX
  • Transcriber's Note
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