Five Stages of Greek Religion
Free

Five Stages of Greek Religion

By Gilbert Murray
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • FIVE STAGES OF
  • GREEK RELIGION
    • GILBERT MURRAY
      • Boston
      • THE BEACON PRESS
    • Boston
    • THE BEACON PRESS
    • PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION
    • PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION
    • PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CONTENTS
    • I
      • SATURNIA REGNA
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • SATURNIA REGNA
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • II
      • THE OLYMPIAN CONQUEST
        • I. Origin of the Olympians
        • II. The Religious Value of the Olympians
      • I. Origin of the Olympians
      • II. The Religious Value of the Olympians
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • THE OLYMPIAN CONQUEST
      • I. Origin of the Olympians
      • II. The Religious Value of the Olympians
    • I. Origin of the Olympians
    • II. The Religious Value of the Olympians
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • III
      • THE GREAT SCHOOLS OF THE FOURTH CENTURY, B. C.
        • NOTE
      • NOTE
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • THE GREAT SCHOOLS OF THE FOURTH CENTURY, B. C.
      • NOTE
    • NOTE
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • IV
      • THE FAILURE OF NERVE
        • Bibliographical Note
      • Bibliographical Note
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • THE FAILURE OF NERVE
      • Bibliographical Note
    • Bibliographical Note
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • V
      • THE LAST PROTEST
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • THE LAST PROTEST
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • SALLUSTIUS 'ON THE GODS AND THE WORLD'[200-1]
      • I. What the Disciple should be; and concerning Common Conceptions.
      • II. That God is unchanging, unbegotten, eternal, incorporeal, and not in space.
      • III. Concerning myths; that they are divine, and why.
      • IV. That the species of Myth are five, with examples of each.
      • V. On the First Cause.
      • VI. On Gods Cosmic and Hypercosmic.
      • VII. On the Nature of the World and its Eternity.
      • VIII. On Mind and Soul, and that the latter is immortal.
      • IX. On Providence, Fate, and Fortune.
      • X. Concerning Virtue and Vice.
      • XI. Concerning right and wrong Social Organization.[214-1]
      • XII. The origin of evil things; and that there is no positive evil.
      • XIII. How things eternal are said to 'be made' (γίγνεσθαι).
      • XIV. In what sense, though the Gods never change, they are said to be made angry and appeased.
      • XV. Why we give worship to the Gods when they need nothing.
      • XVI. Concerning sacrifices and other worships, that we benefit man by them, but not the gods.
      • XVII. That the World is by nature Eternal.
      • XVIII. Why there are rejections of God, and that God is not injured.
      • XIX. Why sinners are not punished at once.
      • XX. On Transmigration of Souls, and how Souls are said to migrate into brute beasts.
      • XXI. That the Good are happy, both living and dead.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • I. What the Disciple should be; and concerning Common Conceptions.
    • II. That God is unchanging, unbegotten, eternal, incorporeal, and not in space.
    • III. Concerning myths; that they are divine, and why.
    • IV. That the species of Myth are five, with examples of each.
    • V. On the First Cause.
    • VI. On Gods Cosmic and Hypercosmic.
    • VII. On the Nature of the World and its Eternity.
    • VIII. On Mind and Soul, and that the latter is immortal.
    • IX. On Providence, Fate, and Fortune.
    • X. Concerning Virtue and Vice.
    • XI. Concerning right and wrong Social Organization.[214-1]
    • XII. The origin of evil things; and that there is no positive evil.
    • XIII. How things eternal are said to 'be made' (γίγνεσθαι).
    • XIV. In what sense, though the Gods never change, they are said to be made angry and appeased.
    • XV. Why we give worship to the Gods when they need nothing.
    • XVI. Concerning sacrifices and other worships, that we benefit man by them, but not the gods.
    • XVII. That the World is by nature Eternal.
    • XVIII. Why there are rejections of God, and that God is not injured.
    • XIX. Why sinners are not punished at once.
    • XX. On Transmigration of Souls, and how Souls are said to migrate into brute beasts.
    • XXI. That the Good are happy, both living and dead.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • INDEX
    • Transcriber's Notes
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