German Problems and Personalities
Free

German Problems and Personalities

By Charles Sarolea
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • German Problems and Personalities
  • CONTENTS
  • GERMAN PROBLEMS AND PERSONALITIES
  • INTRODUCTION BY THE LITERARY EDITOR OF THE NEW YORK “TIMES”
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER I
  • AN AMERICAN PREFACE[3]
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
    • II.
    • III.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER II
  • MY FORECASTS OF 1906 AND 1912[4]
    • I.—We are Drifting into War.
      • II.—The Strength of Anti-British Feeling in Germany.
      • III.—War the German Ideal and the German Idol.
      • IV.—Why Germany has kept the Peace.
      • V.—The Political Preparation of War.
      • VI.—The Imaginary German Grievances.
      • VII.—The Pacific Meaning of the Entente.
      • VIII.—German Megalomania.
      • IX.—German Self-Assertion.
      • X.—Germany stands for Reaction.
      • XI.—Prussia controls Germany.
      • XII.—Why Prussia has enslaved Germany.
      • XIII.—The German Reichstag as a Debating Club.
      • XIV.—The Servility of the German Universities and of the Churches.
      • XV.—The Pan-German Plot.[8]
      • XVI.—Germany controlling Turkey.[11]
      • XVII.—German Socialism making for Reaction and War.
      • XVIII.—Is the Kaiser making for Peace or for War?
      • XIX.—Belgium the Achilles Heel of the British Empire.
      • XX.—The Neutrality of Belgium will be violated.
      • XXI.—The Coming War will be a Political and Religious Crusade.
      • XXII.—The Nature of the Coming War.
    • II.—The Strength of Anti-British Feeling in Germany.
    • III.—War the German Ideal and the German Idol.
    • IV.—Why Germany has kept the Peace.
    • V.—The Political Preparation of War.
    • VI.—The Imaginary German Grievances.
    • VII.—The Pacific Meaning of the Entente.
    • VIII.—German Megalomania.
    • IX.—German Self-Assertion.
    • X.—Germany stands for Reaction.
    • XI.—Prussia controls Germany.
    • XII.—Why Prussia has enslaved Germany.
    • XIII.—The German Reichstag as a Debating Club.
    • XIV.—The Servility of the German Universities and of the Churches.
    • XV.—The Pan-German Plot.[8]
    • XVI.—Germany controlling Turkey.[11]
    • XVII.—German Socialism making for Reaction and War.
    • XVIII.—Is the Kaiser making for Peace or for War?
    • XIX.—Belgium the Achilles Heel of the British Empire.
    • XX.—The Neutrality of Belgium will be violated.
    • XXI.—The Coming War will be a Political and Religious Crusade.
    • XXII.—The Nature of the Coming War.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER III
  • THE CURSE OF THE HOHENZOLLERN
    • I.—Royalties made in Germany.
      • II.—The Significance of the Hohenzollern Dynasty.
      • III.—Landmarks in Hohenzollern History.
      • IV.—A Dynasty of Upstarts.
      • V.—Prussia as an Upstart State.
      • VI.—The Prussian State is not a German State.
      • VII.—Prussia as a Military State.
      • VIII.—Prussia as a Predatory State.
      • IX.—Prussia as a Feudal State.
      • X.—Prussia as a Despotic State.
      • XI.—The Hohenzollern as the Champions of Protestantism.
      • XII.—How the German People were subjected to Prussia.
      • XIII.—Judgment on the Hohenzollern State.
    • II.—The Significance of the Hohenzollern Dynasty.
    • III.—Landmarks in Hohenzollern History.
    • IV.—A Dynasty of Upstarts.
    • V.—Prussia as an Upstart State.
    • VI.—The Prussian State is not a German State.
    • VII.—Prussia as a Military State.
    • VIII.—Prussia as a Predatory State.
    • IX.—Prussia as a Feudal State.
    • X.—Prussia as a Despotic State.
    • XI.—The Hohenzollern as the Champions of Protestantism.
    • XII.—How the German People were subjected to Prussia.
    • XIII.—Judgment on the Hohenzollern State.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER IV
  • THE GERMAN WAR-TRIUMVIRATE
    • I.—NIETZSCHE.
      • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
      • II.—MONTAIGNE AND NIETZSCHE.
      • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
      • III.—TREITSCHKE[14] AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF PRUSSIANISM.
      • I.—Treitschke as the Representative Prussian.
      • II.—Treitschke’s Personality.
      • III.—Treitschke as a Writer.
      • IV.—Treitschke as a Clear and Original Thinker.
      • V.—The Prussian State the Centre of Treitschke’s Literary Activities.
      • VI.—Treitschke’s Treatise on Politics.
      • VII.—Prussia the Sole Standard of Political Values.
      • VIII.—Treitschke’s Political Paganism.
      • IX.—Treitschke’s Antipathies and Hatreds.
      • X.—Treitschke’s Hatred of the Jews.
      • XI.—The Theory of the National State.
      • XII.—The Heresy of Individualism.
      • XIII.—The Heresy of Internationalism.
      • XIV.—The Heresy of Imperialism.
      • XV.—The Dogma of the “Will to Power.”
      • XVI.—The End justifies the Means.
      • XVII.—War as the Vital Principle of Political Life.
      • XVIII.—The Monarchy as the Ideal Form of Government.
      • XIX.—The Aristocracy as the Mainstay of the Monarchic State.
      • XX.—The French Revolutionary Dogma of Equality.
      • XXI.—The Plea for Protestantism.
      • XXII.—The Necessity of Great Powers.
      • XXIII.—The Anomaly of the Small State.
      • XXIV.
      • IV.—GENERAL VON BERNHARDI.[15]
    • I.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • II.—MONTAIGNE AND NIETZSCHE.
    • I.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • III.—TREITSCHKE[14] AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF PRUSSIANISM.
    • I.—Treitschke as the Representative Prussian.
    • II.—Treitschke’s Personality.
    • III.—Treitschke as a Writer.
    • IV.—Treitschke as a Clear and Original Thinker.
    • V.—The Prussian State the Centre of Treitschke’s Literary Activities.
    • VI.—Treitschke’s Treatise on Politics.
    • VII.—Prussia the Sole Standard of Political Values.
    • VIII.—Treitschke’s Political Paganism.
    • IX.—Treitschke’s Antipathies and Hatreds.
    • X.—Treitschke’s Hatred of the Jews.
    • XI.—The Theory of the National State.
    • XII.—The Heresy of Individualism.
    • XIII.—The Heresy of Internationalism.
    • XIV.—The Heresy of Imperialism.
    • XV.—The Dogma of the “Will to Power.”
    • XVI.—The End justifies the Means.
    • XVII.—War as the Vital Principle of Political Life.
    • XVIII.—The Monarchy as the Ideal Form of Government.
    • XIX.—The Aristocracy as the Mainstay of the Monarchic State.
    • XX.—The French Revolutionary Dogma of Equality.
    • XXI.—The Plea for Protestantism.
    • XXII.—The Necessity of Great Powers.
    • XXIII.—The Anomaly of the Small State.
    • XXIV.
    • IV.—GENERAL VON BERNHARDI.[15]
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER V
  • FREDERICK THE GREAT: THE FATHER OF PRUSSIAN MILITARISM
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • CHAPTER VI
  • THE APOTHEOSIS OF GOETHE
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
    • II.
    • III.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER VII
  • THE SERVICE OF THE CITY IN GERMANY[19]
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
      • VII.
      • VIII.
      • IX.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • VII.
    • VIII.
    • IX.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER VIII
  • THE NEGLECT OF GERMAN
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER IX
  • MECKLENBURG, THE PARADISE OF PRUSSIAN JUNKERTHUM
    • I.
      • II.
    • II.
    • CHAPTER X
  • THE GERMAN RACE HERESY AND THE WAR
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
      • VII.
      • VIII.
      • IX.
      • X.
      • XI.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • VII.
    • VIII.
    • IX.
    • X.
    • XI.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER XI
  • A SLUMP IN GERMAN THEOLOGY
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • CHAPTER XII
  • THE GERMAN ENIGMA[22]
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
      • VII.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • VII.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER XIII
  • THE TRAGIC ISOLATION OF GERMANY: AN INTERVIEW WITH A CONTINENTAL STATESMAN
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER XIV
  • RUSSIA AND GERMANY
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
      • VII.
      • VIII.
      • IX.
      • X.
      • XI.
      • XII.
      • XIII.
      • XIV.
      • XV.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • VII.
    • VIII.
    • IX.
    • X.
    • XI.
    • XII.
    • XIII.
    • XIV.
    • XV.
    • CHAPTER XV
  • THE PEACEMAKER OF GERMANY: PRINCE BERNHARD VON BÜLOW
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • CHAPTER XVI
  • THE SILENCE OF HERR VON BETHMANN-HOLLWEG
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • CHAPTER XVII
  • THE COMING REVOLUTION IN GERMANY
    • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • CHAPTER XVIII
  • VIA PACIS
    • APPENDIX
  • THE PRIVATE MORALITY OF THE PRUSSIAN KINGS
    • FREDERICK WILLIAM II.: THE HOHENZOLLERN POLYGAMIST
      • I.
      • II.
      • III.
      • IV.
      • V.
      • VI.
      • VII.
      • VIII.
      • IX.
      • X.
      • XI.
      • XII.
      • XIII.
      • XIV.
    • I.
    • II.
    • III.
    • IV.
    • V.
    • VI.
    • VII.
    • VIII.
    • IX.
    • X.
    • XI.
    • XII.
    • XIII.
    • XIV.
    • Select Announcements of some new and recent volumes published by Chatto & Windus.
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