Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society - Vol 1 - 1666 Giving some Accompt of the present Undertakings, Studies, and Labours of the Ingenious in many considerable parts of the World
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Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society - Vol 1 - 1666 Giving some Accompt of the present Undertakings, Studies, and Labours of the Ingenious in many considerable parts of the World

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Table of Contents
  • PHILOSOPHICAL
    • TRANSACTIONS:
  • ACCOMPT
    • INGENIOUS
    • WORLD
      • Vol I.
      • For Anno 1665, and 1666.
      • TO THE
    • Vol I.
    • For Anno 1665, and 1666.
    • TO THE
    • Royal Society.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • The Introduction.
      • An Accompt of the improvement of Optick Glasses.
      • A Spot in one of the Belts of Jupiter.
      • The Motion of the late Comet prædicted.
      • An Experimental History of Cold.
      • An Account of a very odd Monstrous Calf.
      • Of a peculiar Lead-Ore of Germany, and the Use thereof.
      • Of an Hungarian Bolus, of the same Effect with the Bolus Armenus.
      • Of the New American Whale-fishing about the Bermudas.
      • A Narrative concerning the success of Pendulum-Watches at Sea for the Longitudes.
      • The Character, lately published beyond the Seas, of an Eminent person, not long since dead at Tholouse, where he was a Councellor of Parliament.
      • LONDON,
    • The Introduction.
    • An Accompt of the improvement of Optick Glasses.
    • A Spot in one of the Belts of Jupiter.
    • The Motion of the late Comet prædicted.
    • An Experimental History of Cold.
    • An Account of a very odd Monstrous Calf.
    • Of a peculiar Lead-Ore of Germany, and the Use thereof.
    • Of an Hungarian Bolus, of the same Effect with the Bolus Armenus.
    • Of the New American Whale-fishing about the Bermudas.
    • A Narrative concerning the success of Pendulum-Watches at Sea for the Longitudes.
    • The Character, lately published beyond the Seas, of an Eminent person, not long since dead at Tholouse, where he was a Councellor of Parliament.
    • LONDON,
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • Extract of a Letter, lately written from Rome, touching the late Comet, and a New one.
      • Extract of a Letter, written from Paris, containing some Reflections on part of the precedent Roman Letter.
      • An Observation imparted to the Noble Mr. Boyle, by Mr. David Thomas, touching some particulars further considerable in the Monster mentioned in the first Papers of these Philosophical Transactions.
      • Extract of a Letter, lately written from Venice by the Learned Doctor Walter Pope, to the Reverend Dean of Rippon, Doctor John Wilkins, concerning the Mines of Mercury in Friuli; and a way of producing Windby the fall of Water.
      • An Extract of a Letter, containing some Observations, made in the ordering of Silk-worms, communicated by that known Vertuoso, Mr. Dudley Palmer, from the ingenuous Mr. Edward Digges.
      • An account of Micrographia, or the Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies, made by Magnifying Glasses.
    • Extract of a Letter, lately written from Rome, touching the late Comet, and a New one.
    • Extract of a Letter, written from Paris, containing some Reflections on part of the precedent Roman Letter.
    • An Observation imparted to the Noble Mr. Boyle, by Mr. David Thomas, touching some particulars further considerable in the Monster mentioned in the first Papers of these Philosophical Transactions.
    • Extract of a Letter, lately written from Venice by the Learned Doctor Walter Pope, to the Reverend Dean of Rippon, Doctor John Wilkins, concerning the Mines of Mercury in Friuli; and a way of producing Windby the fall of Water.
    • An Extract of a Letter, containing some Observations, made in the ordering of Silk-worms, communicated by that known Vertuoso, Mr. Dudley Palmer, from the ingenuous Mr. Edward Digges.
    • An account of Micrographia, or the Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies, made by Magnifying Glasses.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • Some Observations and Experiments upon May-Dew.
      • The Motion of the Second Comet predicted, by the same Gentleman, who predicted that of the former.
      • A Relation of the advice given by Monsieur Petit, Intendant of the Fortifications of Normandy, touching the Conjunction of the Ocean and Mediterranean.
      • Of the Way of killing Ratle-Snakes.
      • A Relation of Persons killed with subterraneous Damps.
      • Of the Mineral of Liege, yeilding both Brimstoneand Vitriol, and the way of extracting them out of it, used at Liege.
      • A further Account of Mr. Boyle's Experimental History of Cold.
      • LONDON,
    • Some Observations and Experiments upon May-Dew.
    • The Motion of the Second Comet predicted, by the same Gentleman, who predicted that of the former.
    • A Relation of the advice given by Monsieur Petit, Intendant of the Fortifications of Normandy, touching the Conjunction of the Ocean and Mediterranean.
    • Of the Way of killing Ratle-Snakes.
    • A Relation of Persons killed with subterraneous Damps.
    • Of the Mineral of Liege, yeilding both Brimstoneand Vitriol, and the way of extracting them out of it, used at Liege.
    • A further Account of Mr. Boyle's Experimental History of Cold.
    • LONDON,
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • A Relation of some extraordinary Tydes in the West-Isles of Scotland, as it was communicated by Sr. Robert Moray.
      • Monsieur Auzout's Judgment touching the Apertures of Object-Glasses, and their Proportions, in respect of the several Lengths of Telescopes.
      • Considerations of Monsieur Auzout upon Mr. Hook's New Instrument for Grinding of Optick-Glasses.
      • Mr. Hook's Answer to Monsieur Auzout's Considerations, in a Letter to the Publisher of these Transactions.
      • Of a means to illuminate an Object in what proportion one pleaseth; and of the Distances requisite to burn Bodies by the Sun.
      • A further Account, touching Signor Campani's Book and Performances about Optick-glasses.
      • Signor Campani's Answer: and Monsieur Auzout's Animadversions thereon.
      • An Account of Mr. Richard Lower's newly published Vindication of Doctor Willis's Diatriba de Febribus.
      • A Note touching a Relation, inserted in the last Transactions.
      • LONDON,
    • A Relation of some extraordinary Tydes in the West-Isles of Scotland, as it was communicated by Sr. Robert Moray.
    • Monsieur Auzout's Judgment touching the Apertures of Object-Glasses, and their Proportions, in respect of the several Lengths of Telescopes.
    • Considerations of Monsieur Auzout upon Mr. Hook's New Instrument for Grinding of Optick-Glasses.
    • Mr. Hook's Answer to Monsieur Auzout's Considerations, in a Letter to the Publisher of these Transactions.
    • Of a means to illuminate an Object in what proportion one pleaseth; and of the Distances requisite to burn Bodies by the Sun.
    • A further Account, touching Signor Campani's Book and Performances about Optick-glasses.
    • Signor Campani's Answer: and Monsieur Auzout's Animadversions thereon.
    • An Account of Mr. Richard Lower's newly published Vindication of Doctor Willis's Diatriba de Febribus.
    • A Note touching a Relation, inserted in the last Transactions.
    • LONDON,
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • An Account, how Adits & Mines are wrought at Liege without Air-shafts, communicated by Sir Robert Moray.
      • A way to break easily and speedily the hardest Rocks, communicated by the same Person, as he received it from Monsieur Du Son, the Inventor.
      • Observables upon a Monstrous Head.
      • Observables in the Body of the Earl of Balcarres.
      • Of the designed Progress to be made in the Breeding of Silkworms, and the Making of Silk, in France.
      • Enquiries concerning Agriculture.
      • 1. For Arable.
      • 2. For Meadows.
      • Advertisement.
      • LONDON,
    • An Account, how Adits & Mines are wrought at Liege without Air-shafts, communicated by Sir Robert Moray.
    • A way to break easily and speedily the hardest Rocks, communicated by the same Person, as he received it from Monsieur Du Son, the Inventor.
    • Observables upon a Monstrous Head.
    • Observables in the Body of the Earl of Balcarres.
    • Of the designed Progress to be made in the Breeding of Silkworms, and the Making of Silk, in France.
    • Enquiries concerning Agriculture.
    • 1. For Arable.
    • 2. For Meadows.
    • Advertisement.
    • LONDON,
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • An Account of a not ordinary Burning Concave, lately made at Lyons, and compared with several others made formerly.
      • Of Monsieur Hevelius's Promise of imparting to the World his Invention of making Optick Glasses; and of the hopes given by Monsieur Hugens of Zulichem, to perform something of the like nature; as also of the Expectations, conceived of some Ingenious Persons in Englandto improve Telescopes.
      • An Advertisement of a way of making more lively Counterfeits of Nature in Wax, then are extant in Painting: And of a new kind of Mapsin a low Relievo. Both practised in France.
      • Some Anatomical Observations of Milk found in Veins, instead of Blood; and of Grass, found in the Wind-pipes of some Animals.
      • Of a place in England, where, without petrifying Water, Wood is turned into Stone.
      • Of the nature of a certain Stone, found in the Indies, in the head of a Serpent.
      • Of the way, used in the Mogol's Dominions, to make Saltpetre.
      • An account of Hevelius his Prodromus Cometicus, together with some Animadversions made upon it by a French Philosopher.
      • Of the Mundus Subterraneus of Athanasius Kircher.
      • A farther account of an Observation above-mentioned, about White Blood.
      • Note.
    • An Account of a not ordinary Burning Concave, lately made at Lyons, and compared with several others made formerly.
    • Of Monsieur Hevelius's Promise of imparting to the World his Invention of making Optick Glasses; and of the hopes given by Monsieur Hugens of Zulichem, to perform something of the like nature; as also of the Expectations, conceived of some Ingenious Persons in Englandto improve Telescopes.
    • An Advertisement of a way of making more lively Counterfeits of Nature in Wax, then are extant in Painting: And of a new kind of Mapsin a low Relievo. Both practised in France.
    • Some Anatomical Observations of Milk found in Veins, instead of Blood; and of Grass, found in the Wind-pipes of some Animals.
    • Of a place in England, where, without petrifying Water, Wood is turned into Stone.
    • Of the nature of a certain Stone, found in the Indies, in the head of a Serpent.
    • Of the way, used in the Mogol's Dominions, to make Saltpetre.
    • An account of Hevelius his Prodromus Cometicus, together with some Animadversions made upon it by a French Philosopher.
    • Of the Mundus Subterraneus of Athanasius Kircher.
    • A farther account of an Observation above-mentioned, about White Blood.
    • Note.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • Of Monsieur de Sons Progress in working ParabolarGlasses.
      • Monsieur Auzout's Speculations of the Changes, likely to be discovered in the Earth and Moon, by their respective Inhabitants.
      • The Instance of the same Person to Mr. Hook, for communicating his Contrivance of making, with a Glass of a Sphere of 20 or 40 foot diameter, a Telescopedrawing several hundred foot; and his offer of recompensing that Secret with another, teaching To measure with a Telescope the Distances of Objects upon the Earth.
      • An Experiment of a way of preparing a Liquor, that shall sink into, and colour the whole Body of Marble, causing a Picture, drawn on a surface, to appear also in the inmost parts of the Stone.
      • An Intimation of a Way, found in Europe to make China-dishes.
      • An Account of an odd Spring in Westphalia, together with an Information touching Salt-Springs and the straining of salt-water.
      • An Account of the Rise and Attempts, of a Way to conveigh Liquors immediately into the Mass of Blood.
    • Of Monsieur de Sons Progress in working ParabolarGlasses.
    • Monsieur Auzout's Speculations of the Changes, likely to be discovered in the Earth and Moon, by their respective Inhabitants.
    • The Instance of the same Person to Mr. Hook, for communicating his Contrivance of making, with a Glass of a Sphere of 20 or 40 foot diameter, a Telescopedrawing several hundred foot; and his offer of recompensing that Secret with another, teaching To measure with a Telescope the Distances of Objects upon the Earth.
    • An Experiment of a way of preparing a Liquor, that shall sink into, and colour the whole Body of Marble, causing a Picture, drawn on a surface, to appear also in the inmost parts of the Stone.
    • An Intimation of a Way, found in Europe to make China-dishes.
    • An Account of an odd Spring in Westphalia, together with an Information touching Salt-Springs and the straining of salt-water.
    • An Account of the Rise and Attempts, of a Way to conveigh Liquors immediately into the Mass of Blood.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • An Account of the Tryalls, made in Italy of Campani'snew Optick Glasses.
      • A Further Relation of the Whale-fishing about the Bermudas, and on the Coast of New-England and New-Netherland.
      • Of a remarkable Spring, about Paderborn in Germany.
      • Of some other not-common Springs at Basel and in Alsatia.
      • Of the richest Salt-Springs in Germany.
      • Some Observations of swarms of strange Insects, and the Mischiefs done by them.
      • An Observation touching the Bodies of Snakes and Vipers.
      • Some Observations of odde Constitutions of Bodies.
      • A way of preserving Ice and Snow by Chaffe.
      • Directions for Sea-men, bound for far Voyages.
      • Some Observations concerning Jupiter. Of the shadow of one of his Satellites seen, by a Telescope passing over the Body of Jupiter.
      • Of a permanent Spot in Jupiter: by which is manifested the conversion of Jupiter about his own Axis.
      • Of some Philosophical and curious Books, that are shortly to come abroad.
    • An Account of the Tryalls, made in Italy of Campani'snew Optick Glasses.
    • A Further Relation of the Whale-fishing about the Bermudas, and on the Coast of New-England and New-Netherland.
    • Of a remarkable Spring, about Paderborn in Germany.
    • Of some other not-common Springs at Basel and in Alsatia.
    • Of the richest Salt-Springs in Germany.
    • Some Observations of swarms of strange Insects, and the Mischiefs done by them.
    • An Observation touching the Bodies of Snakes and Vipers.
    • Some Observations of odde Constitutions of Bodies.
    • A way of preserving Ice and Snow by Chaffe.
    • Directions for Sea-men, bound for far Voyages.
    • Some Observations concerning Jupiter. Of the shadow of one of his Satellites seen, by a Telescope passing over the Body of Jupiter.
    • Of a permanent Spot in Jupiter: by which is manifested the conversion of Jupiter about his own Axis.
    • Of some Philosophical and curious Books, that are shortly to come abroad.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • An Appendix to the Directions for Seamen, bound for far Voyages.
      • Of the Judgement of some of the English Astronomers, touching the difference between two learned men, about an Observation made of the First of the two late Comets.
      • Of a correspondency, to be procured, for the Finding out the True distance of the Sun and Moon from the Earth, by the Paralax, observed under (or neer) the same Meridian.
      • Of an Observation, not long since made in England, of Saturn.
      • A Relation of some Mercurial Observations, and their Results.
      • Some Observations of Vipers.
      • Advertisement.
      • LONDON,
    • An Appendix to the Directions for Seamen, bound for far Voyages.
    • Of the Judgement of some of the English Astronomers, touching the difference between two learned men, about an Observation made of the First of the two late Comets.
    • Of a correspondency, to be procured, for the Finding out the True distance of the Sun and Moon from the Earth, by the Paralax, observed under (or neer) the same Meridian.
    • Of an Observation, not long since made in England, of Saturn.
    • A Relation of some Mercurial Observations, and their Results.
    • Some Observations of Vipers.
    • Advertisement.
    • LONDON,
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • Observations continued upon the Barometer, or rather Ballance of the Air.
      • A Relation concerning the late Earthquake neer Oxford; together with some Observations of the sealed Weatherglass, and the Barometer both upon that Phænomenon, and in General.
      • A more particular Account of those Observations about Jupiter, that were mentioned in Numb. 8.
      • An Account of some Books, lately published.
      • NOTE.
    • Observations continued upon the Barometer, or rather Ballance of the Air.
    • A Relation concerning the late Earthquake neer Oxford; together with some Observations of the sealed Weatherglass, and the Barometer both upon that Phænomenon, and in General.
    • A more particular Account of those Observations about Jupiter, that were mentioned in Numb. 8.
    • An Account of some Books, lately published.
    • NOTE.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • A Confirmation of the former Account touching the late Earth-quakenear Oxford, and the Concomitants thereof.
      • Some Observations and Directions about the Barometer, communicated by the same Hand, to the Author of this Tract.
      • General Heads for a Natural History of a Countrey, Great or Small, imparted likewise by Mr. Boyle.
      • An Extract of a Letter, Written from Holland, about Preserving of Ships from being Worm-eaten.
      • An Account of a Book, very lately publish't, entituled, The Origine of Forms and Qualities, illustrated by Considerations and Experiments, by the Honourable Robert Boyle.
      • Some New observations about the Planet Mars, communicated since the Printing of the former sheets.
    • A Confirmation of the former Account touching the late Earth-quakenear Oxford, and the Concomitants thereof.
    • Some Observations and Directions about the Barometer, communicated by the same Hand, to the Author of this Tract.
    • General Heads for a Natural History of a Countrey, Great or Small, imparted likewise by Mr. Boyle.
    • An Extract of a Letter, Written from Holland, about Preserving of Ships from being Worm-eaten.
    • An Account of a Book, very lately publish't, entituled, The Origine of Forms and Qualities, illustrated by Considerations and Experiments, by the Honourable Robert Boyle.
    • Some New observations about the Planet Mars, communicated since the Printing of the former sheets.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • A way of preserving Birds taken out of the Egge, and other small Fætus's; communicated by Mr. Boyle.
      • An Extract of a Letter, sent lately to Sir Robert Moray out of Virginia, concerning an unusual way of propagating Mulberry trees there, for the better improvement of the Silk-Work; together with some other particulars, tending to the good of that Plantation.
      • A Method, by which a Glass of a small Plano-convex Sphere may be made to refract the Rayes of light to a Focus of a far greater distance, than is usual.
      • Observations about Shining Worms in Oysters.
      • Some Observations of the Effects of Touch and Friction.
      • Some particulars, communicated from forraign parts, concerning the Permanent Spott in Jupiter; and a Contest between two Artists about Optick Glasses, &c.
      • An Account of Dr. Sydenham's Book, entituled, Methodus Curandi Febres, Propriis observationibus superstructa.
      • Advertisement.
    • A way of preserving Birds taken out of the Egge, and other small Fætus's; communicated by Mr. Boyle.
    • An Extract of a Letter, sent lately to Sir Robert Moray out of Virginia, concerning an unusual way of propagating Mulberry trees there, for the better improvement of the Silk-Work; together with some other particulars, tending to the good of that Plantation.
    • A Method, by which a Glass of a small Plano-convex Sphere may be made to refract the Rayes of light to a Focus of a far greater distance, than is usual.
    • Observations about Shining Worms in Oysters.
    • Some Observations of the Effects of Touch and Friction.
    • Some particulars, communicated from forraign parts, concerning the Permanent Spott in Jupiter; and a Contest between two Artists about Optick Glasses, &c.
    • An Account of Dr. Sydenham's Book, entituled, Methodus Curandi Febres, Propriis observationibus superstructa.
    • Advertisement.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • Certain Problemstouching some Points of Navigation.
      • A new Contrivance of Wheel-Barometer, much more easy to be prepared, than that, which is described in the Micrography; imparted by the Author of that Book.
      • An Account of Four Suns, which very lately appear'd in France, and of two Raine-bows, unusually posited, seen in the same Kingdom, somewhat longer agoe.
      • A Relation of an Accident by Thunder and Lightning, at Oxford.
      • An Experiment to examine, what Figure, and Celerity of Motionbegetteth, or encreaseth Light and Flame.
      • Some Considerations touching a Letter in the Journal des Scavans of May 24. 1666.
    • Certain Problemstouching some Points of Navigation.
    • A new Contrivance of Wheel-Barometer, much more easy to be prepared, than that, which is described in the Micrography; imparted by the Author of that Book.
    • An Account of Four Suns, which very lately appear'd in France, and of two Raine-bows, unusually posited, seen in the same Kingdom, somewhat longer agoe.
    • A Relation of an Accident by Thunder and Lightning, at Oxford.
    • An Experiment to examine, what Figure, and Celerity of Motionbegetteth, or encreaseth Light and Flame.
    • Some Considerations touching a Letter in the Journal des Scavans of May 24. 1666.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • An Account of a New kind of Baroscope, which may be called Statical; and of some Advantages and Conveniencies it hath above the Mercurial: Communicated, some while since, by the Honourable Robert Boyle.
      • The Particulars of those Observations of the Planet Mars, formerly intimated to have been made at London in the Months of February and March A. 1665/6.
      • Observations made in Italy, confirming the former, and withall fixing the Period of the Revolution of Mars.
      • Some Observations lately made at London concerning the Planet Jupiter.
      • A late Observation about Saturn made by the same.
      • A Relation of a sad effect of Thunder and Lightning:
      • Of some Books lately publish't.
    • An Account of a New kind of Baroscope, which may be called Statical; and of some Advantages and Conveniencies it hath above the Mercurial: Communicated, some while since, by the Honourable Robert Boyle.
    • The Particulars of those Observations of the Planet Mars, formerly intimated to have been made at London in the Months of February and March A. 1665/6.
    • Observations made in Italy, confirming the former, and withall fixing the Period of the Revolution of Mars.
    • Some Observations lately made at London concerning the Planet Jupiter.
    • A late Observation about Saturn made by the same.
    • A Relation of a sad effect of Thunder and Lightning:
    • Of some Books lately publish't.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • A new Frigorifick Experiment shewing, how a considerable degree of Cold may be suddenly produced without the help of Snow, Ice, Haile, Wind, or Niter, and that at any time of the year.
      • An Account of two Books lately printed in London.
    • A new Frigorifick Experiment shewing, how a considerable degree of Cold may be suddenly produced without the help of Snow, Ice, Haile, Wind, or Niter, and that at any time of the year.
    • An Account of two Books lately printed in London.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • An Essay of Dr. John Wallis, exhibiting his Hypothesis about the Flux and Reflux of the Sea.
      • An APPENDIX, written by way of Letter to the Publisher; Being an answer to some Objections, made by several Persons, to the precedent Discourse.
      • ANIMADVERSIONS of Dr. Wallis, upon Mr. Hobs's late Book, De Principiis & Ratiocinatione Geometrarum.
    • An Essay of Dr. John Wallis, exhibiting his Hypothesis about the Flux and Reflux of the Sea.
    • An APPENDIX, written by way of Letter to the Publisher; Being an answer to some Objections, made by several Persons, to the precedent Discourse.
    • ANIMADVERSIONS of Dr. Wallis, upon Mr. Hobs's late Book, De Principiis & Ratiocinatione Geometrarum.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • Observations made in several places, Of the late Eclipse of the Sun, which hapned on the 22 of June, 1666.
      • Some Inquiries and Directions concerning Tides, proposed by Dr. Wallis, for the proving, or disproving of his lately publish't Discourse concerning them.
      • Considerations and Enquiries concerning Tides, by Sir Robert Moray; likewise for a further search into Dr. Wallis's newly publish't Hypothesis.
      • An Account of Several Books lately published
      • Advertisement.
      • LONDON,
    • Observations made in several places, Of the late Eclipse of the Sun, which hapned on the 22 of June, 1666.
    • Some Inquiries and Directions concerning Tides, proposed by Dr. Wallis, for the proving, or disproving of his lately publish't Discourse concerning them.
    • Considerations and Enquiries concerning Tides, by Sir Robert Moray; likewise for a further search into Dr. Wallis's newly publish't Hypothesis.
    • An Account of Several Books lately published
    • Advertisement.
    • LONDON,
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • Patternsof the Tables proposed to be made for Observing of Tides, promised in the next foregoing Transactions; by Sir Rob. Moray.
      • A Perpendicular Line divided into Signes, supposed to be the Periodsof the Risings and Fallings of the Tides, as is in the other Table represented.
      • Other Inquiries Concerning the Sea.
      • Some Considerations concerning the Parenchymous parts of the Body.
      • Observables touching Petrification.
      • A Relation of a kind of Worms that eat out Stones.
      • Some promiscuous Observations, made in Somerset shire, and imparted by the above-mentioned Dr. Beale.
      • A Problem for finding the Year of the Julian Period by a new and very easie Method.
      • An Account of some Books, not long since published.
    • Patternsof the Tables proposed to be made for Observing of Tides, promised in the next foregoing Transactions; by Sir Rob. Moray.
    • A Perpendicular Line divided into Signes, supposed to be the Periodsof the Risings and Fallings of the Tides, as is in the other Table represented.
    • Other Inquiries Concerning the Sea.
    • Some Considerations concerning the Parenchymous parts of the Body.
    • Observables touching Petrification.
    • A Relation of a kind of Worms that eat out Stones.
    • Some promiscuous Observations, made in Somerset shire, and imparted by the above-mentioned Dr. Beale.
    • A Problem for finding the Year of the Julian Period by a new and very easie Method.
    • An Account of some Books, not long since published.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • An Addition to the Instances of Petrification, enumerated in the last of these Papers.
      • Articles of Inquiries touching Mines.
      • QUÆRIES
      • About the first Title.
      • About the second Title.
      • About the third Title.
      • About the fourth Title.
      • About the Fifth Title.
      • About the sixth Title.
      • Promiscuous Inquiries about Mines, from the same Author.
      • Promiscuous Inquiries, chiefly about Cold, formerly sent and recommended to Monsieur Heuelius; together with his Answer return'd to some of them.
      • The Inquiries sent to Dantzick, are these;
      • The Success of the Experiment of Transfusing the Bloud of one Animal into another.
    • An Addition to the Instances of Petrification, enumerated in the last of these Papers.
    • Articles of Inquiries touching Mines.
    • QUÆRIES
    • About the first Title.
    • About the second Title.
    • About the third Title.
    • About the fourth Title.
    • About the Fifth Title.
    • About the sixth Title.
    • Promiscuous Inquiries about Mines, from the same Author.
    • Promiscuous Inquiries, chiefly about Cold, formerly sent and recommended to Monsieur Heuelius; together with his Answer return'd to some of them.
    • The Inquiries sent to Dantzick, are these;
    • The Success of the Experiment of Transfusing the Bloud of one Animal into another.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • The Method observed in Transfusing the Bloud of one Animal into another.
      • Considerations about this kind of Experiments.
      • Note.
      • An Accompt of some Sanative-waters in Herefordshire.
      • A farther Accompt of the Vitriolate-water, mention'd Num. 18 p. 323. Together with some other particulars touching waters.
      • Inquiries for Turky.
      • An Observation of Optick Glasses made of Rock-Chrystal.
      • An Accompt of the Use of the Grain of Kermesfor Coloration.
      • An Account of Some Books lately published.
    • The Method observed in Transfusing the Bloud of one Animal into another.
    • Considerations about this kind of Experiments.
    • Note.
    • An Accompt of some Sanative-waters in Herefordshire.
    • A farther Accompt of the Vitriolate-water, mention'd Num. 18 p. 323. Together with some other particulars touching waters.
    • Inquiries for Turky.
    • An Observation of Optick Glasses made of Rock-Chrystal.
    • An Accompt of the Use of the Grain of Kermesfor Coloration.
    • An Account of Some Books lately published.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • Monsieur Hevelius's Calculation of the late Solar Eclipse's Quantity, Duration, &c.
      • Eclipsis Solaris.
      • The Figure of the Stars in the Constellation of Cygnus; together with the New Star in it, discover'd some years since, and very lately seen by M. Hevelius again.
      • An Extract of a Letter written Decemb. 28. 1666. by M. Auzout to the Publisher, concerning a way of his, for taking the Diametersof the Planets, and for knowing the Parallax of the Moon; as also the Reason, why in the Solar Eclipse above calculated, the Diameter of the Moon did increase about the end.
      • A Relation of the loss of the Way to prepare the Bononian Stonefor shining.
      • A Description of a Swedish Stone, which affords Sulphur, Vitriol, Allum and Minium.
      • A Relation of the Raining of Ashes, in the Archipelago, upon the Eruption of Mount Vesuvius, some years ago.
      • An Extract Of A Letter not long since written from Rome, rectifying the Relation of Salamanders living in Fire.
      • An Account of several Engagements for Observing of Tydes.
      • Some Suggestions for Remedies against Cold.
      • A Relation of an uncommon Accident in two Aged Persons.
      • An Account of two Books.
    • Monsieur Hevelius's Calculation of the late Solar Eclipse's Quantity, Duration, &c.
    • Eclipsis Solaris.
    • The Figure of the Stars in the Constellation of Cygnus; together with the New Star in it, discover'd some years since, and very lately seen by M. Hevelius again.
    • An Extract of a Letter written Decemb. 28. 1666. by M. Auzout to the Publisher, concerning a way of his, for taking the Diametersof the Planets, and for knowing the Parallax of the Moon; as also the Reason, why in the Solar Eclipse above calculated, the Diameter of the Moon did increase about the end.
    • A Relation of the loss of the Way to prepare the Bononian Stonefor shining.
    • A Description of a Swedish Stone, which affords Sulphur, Vitriol, Allum and Minium.
    • A Relation of the Raining of Ashes, in the Archipelago, upon the Eruption of Mount Vesuvius, some years ago.
    • An Extract Of A Letter not long since written from Rome, rectifying the Relation of Salamanders living in Fire.
    • An Account of several Engagements for Observing of Tydes.
    • Some Suggestions for Remedies against Cold.
    • A Relation of an uncommon Accident in two Aged Persons.
    • An Account of two Books.
  • PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS.
    • The Contents.
      • Tryals proposed by Mr. Boyle to Dr. Lower, to be made by him, for the Improvement of Tranfusing blood out of one live Animal into another; promised Numb. 20. p. 357.
      • A Method for Observing the Eclipses of the Moon, free from the Common Inconveniencies, as it was left by the Learned Mr. Rook, late Gresham-Professor of Geometry.
      • An Account of some Observations, lately made in Spain, by His Excellency the Earl of Sandwich.
      • Extract of a Letter, lately written by Mr. Nathaniel Fairfax to the Publisher, containing Observations about some Insects, and their Inoxiousness, &c.
      • An Account Of Some Books.
      • Advertisement.
      • NOTE,
      • The more
    • Tryals proposed by Mr. Boyle to Dr. Lower, to be made by him, for the Improvement of Tranfusing blood out of one live Animal into another; promised Numb. 20. p. 357.
    • A Method for Observing the Eclipses of the Moon, free from the Common Inconveniencies, as it was left by the Learned Mr. Rook, late Gresham-Professor of Geometry.
    • An Account of some Observations, lately made in Spain, by His Excellency the Earl of Sandwich.
    • Extract of a Letter, lately written by Mr. Nathaniel Fairfax to the Publisher, containing Observations about some Insects, and their Inoxiousness, &c.
    • An Account Of Some Books.
    • Advertisement.
    • NOTE,
    • The more
  • NATURAL METHOD.
    • ERRATA.
  • FINIS.
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