Fish Populations, Following a Drought, in the Neosho and Marais des Cygnes Rivers of Kansas
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Fish Populations, Following a Drought, in the Neosho and Marais des Cygnes Rivers of Kansas

By James E. Deacon
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Table of Contents
  • Fish Populations, Following a Drought, In the Neosho and Marais des Cygnes Rivers of Kansas
  • BY
    • JAMES EVERETT DEACON
  • CONTENTS
  • TABLES
  • INTRODUCTION
    • Table 1. Stream-flow in Cubic Feet per Second, Neosho River near Council Grove, Kansas. Drainage Area: 250 Square Miles
      • Table 2. Stream-flow in Cubic Feet per Second, Neosho River near Parsons, Kansas. Drainage Area: 4905 Square Miles.
      • Table 3. Stream-flow in Cubic Feet per Second, Marais des Cygnes River Near Ottawa, Kansas. Drainage Area: 1,250 Square Miles.
      • Table 4. Stream-flow in Cubic Feet per Second, Marais des Cygnes River at Trading Post, Kansas. Drainage Area: 2,880 Square Miles.
    • Table 2. Stream-flow in Cubic Feet per Second, Neosho River near Parsons, Kansas. Drainage Area: 4905 Square Miles.
    • Table 3. Stream-flow in Cubic Feet per Second, Marais des Cygnes River Near Ottawa, Kansas. Drainage Area: 1,250 Square Miles.
    • Table 4. Stream-flow in Cubic Feet per Second, Marais des Cygnes River at Trading Post, Kansas. Drainage Area: 2,880 Square Miles.
  • DESCRIPTION OF NEOSHO RIVER
  • DESCRIPTION OF MARAIS DES CYGNES RIVER
  • METHODS
    • Electrical Fishing Gear
    • Seines
    • Gill Nets
    • Sodium Cyanide
    • Rotenone
    • Dyes
    • Determination of Abundance
    • Names of Fishes
  • ANNOTATED LIST OF SPECIES
    • Table 5. Numbers and Sizes of Long-nosed Gar Captured by Shocker and Gill Nets at the Middle and Lower Neosho Stations in 1957, 1958 and 1959.
      • Table 6. Numbers and Sizes of Short-nosed Gar Captured by Shocker and Gill Nets at the Middle and Lower Neosho Stations in 1958 and 1959.
      • Table 7. Length-frequency of Channel Catfish from the Neosho River, 1957, 1958 and 1959. (Numbers in Vertical Columns Indicate the Number of Individuals of a Certain Size Collected on That Date.)
      • Table 8. Length-frequency of Freshwater Drum from the Middle Neosho Station in 1957, 1958 and 1959.
      • Table 9. Average Number of Individuals Captured per Hour, Using the Shocker, at Different Times of the Day and Night at the Middle Neosho Station in 1958. Numbers in Parentheses Indicate Total Number Captured.
      • Table 10. Numbers of Fish Seen or Captured per Hour by Use of the Shocker. Excludes Fish Taken by Shocking into a Seine on Riffles; Young-of-the-year Channel Catfish and Flathead Catfish Predominated in Samples Taken by that Method.
      • Table 11. Number of Occurrences (Roman type) and Number Counted (Italic type) per Seining Unit. One Seining Unit Equals 30 Seine-Hauls (ten each with the 4-foot, 12-foot and 25-foot seine) of Which Six Randomly-chosen Hauls Were Counted. Dashes Signify That the Species Occurred in Uncounted Collections Only.
    • Table 6. Numbers and Sizes of Short-nosed Gar Captured by Shocker and Gill Nets at the Middle and Lower Neosho Stations in 1958 and 1959.
    • Table 7. Length-frequency of Channel Catfish from the Neosho River, 1957, 1958 and 1959. (Numbers in Vertical Columns Indicate the Number of Individuals of a Certain Size Collected on That Date.)
    • Table 8. Length-frequency of Freshwater Drum from the Middle Neosho Station in 1957, 1958 and 1959.
    • Table 9. Average Number of Individuals Captured per Hour, Using the Shocker, at Different Times of the Day and Night at the Middle Neosho Station in 1958. Numbers in Parentheses Indicate Total Number Captured.
    • Table 10. Numbers of Fish Seen or Captured per Hour by Use of the Shocker. Excludes Fish Taken by Shocking into a Seine on Riffles; Young-of-the-year Channel Catfish and Flathead Catfish Predominated in Samples Taken by that Method.
    • Table 11. Number of Occurrences (Roman type) and Number Counted (Italic type) per Seining Unit. One Seining Unit Equals 30 Seine-Hauls (ten each with the 4-foot, 12-foot and 25-foot seine) of Which Six Randomly-chosen Hauls Were Counted. Dashes Signify That the Species Occurred in Uncounted Collections Only.
  • FISH-FAUNA OF THE UPPER NEOSHO RIVER
    • Description of Study-areas
    • Methods
      • Rotenone
      • Shocker
    • Rotenone
    • Shocker
    • Changes in the Fauna at the Upper Neosho Station, 1957 Through 1959.
      • Table 12. Percentage-composition of the Fish-fauna at the Upper Neosho Station in 1957, 1958 and 1959, as Computed from Collections Obtained by Using Rotenone.
    • Table 12. Percentage-composition of the Fish-fauna at the Upper Neosho Station in 1957, 1958 and 1959, as Computed from Collections Obtained by Using Rotenone.
    • Local Variability of the Fauna in Different Areas at the Upper Neosho Station, 1959
      • Table 13. Relative Abundance of Fish (Per Cent of Total Population Made Up by Each Species), in the First Collection Made in Each of Four Different Shallow Areas by Means of the Shocker, is Shown in Vertical Columns 1-4. Results of the Use of Rotenone in a Fifth, Deeper Area are Shown in Column 5. Column 6 Combines Data from All Collections Made by Using the Shocker in Seven Shallow Areas (Including Columns 1-4).
    • Table 13. Relative Abundance of Fish (Per Cent of Total Population Made Up by Each Species), in the First Collection Made in Each of Four Different Shallow Areas by Means of the Shocker, is Shown in Vertical Columns 1-4. Results of the Use of Rotenone in a Fifth, Deeper Area are Shown in Column 5. Column 6 Combines Data from All Collections Made by Using the Shocker in Seven Shallow Areas (Including Columns 1-4).
    • Temporal Variability of Fauna in the Same Areas
      • Table 14. Numbers of Individuals Collected by Means of the Shocker at Varying Intervals in September, 1959. The Number at the Top of Each Column is the Date When the Collection was Made.
    • Table 14. Numbers of Individuals Collected by Means of the Shocker at Varying Intervals in September, 1959. The Number at the Top of Each Column is the Date When the Collection was Made.
    • Population-Estimation
      • Area 1
      • Table 15. Data Used in Estimating Total Populations, by Direct Proportions, in Areas 1, 3, and 6 at the Upper Neosho Stations.
      • Area 3
      • Area 6
    • Area 1
    • Table 15. Data Used in Estimating Total Populations, by Direct Proportions, in Areas 1, 3, and 6 at the Upper Neosho Stations.
    • Area 3
    • Area 6
    • Movement of Marked Fish
      • Table 16. Data on Movement of Marked Fish at the Upper Neosho Station, September, 1959.
    • Table 16. Data on Movement of Marked Fish at the Upper Neosho Station, September, 1959.
    • Similarity of the Fauna at the Upper Neosho Station to the Faunas of Nearby Streams
  • COMPARISON OF THE FISH FAUNAS OF THE NEOSHO AND MARAIS DES CYGNES RIVERS
  • FAUNAL CHANGES, 1957 THROUGH 1959
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • FOOTNOTES
  • LITERATURE CITED
    • 28-7576
    • UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PUBLICATIONS MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
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