Systematic Theology (Volume 1 of 3)
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Systematic Theology (Volume 1 of 3)

By Augustus Hopkins Strong
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Book Description
Table of Contents
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • Part I. Prolegomena.
    • Chapter I. Idea Of Theology.
      • I. Definition of Theology.
      • II. Aim of Theology.
      • III. Possibility of Theology.
        • 1. The existence of a God.
        • 2. Man's capacity for the knowledge of God
        • 3. God's revelation of himself to man.
      • 1. The existence of a God.
      • 2. Man's capacity for the knowledge of God
      • 3. God's revelation of himself to man.
      • IV. Necessity of Theology.
      • V. Relation of Theology to Religion.
        • 1. Derivation.
        • 2. False Conceptions.
        • 3. Essential Idea.
        • 4. Inferences.
      • 1. Derivation.
      • 2. False Conceptions.
      • 3. Essential Idea.
      • 4. Inferences.
    • I. Definition of Theology.
    • II. Aim of Theology.
    • III. Possibility of Theology.
      • 1. The existence of a God.
      • 2. Man's capacity for the knowledge of God
      • 3. God's revelation of himself to man.
    • 1. The existence of a God.
    • 2. Man's capacity for the knowledge of God
    • 3. God's revelation of himself to man.
    • IV. Necessity of Theology.
    • V. Relation of Theology to Religion.
      • 1. Derivation.
      • 2. False Conceptions.
      • 3. Essential Idea.
      • 4. Inferences.
    • 1. Derivation.
    • 2. False Conceptions.
    • 3. Essential Idea.
    • 4. Inferences.
    • Chapter II. Material of Theology.
      • I. Sources of Theology.
        • 1. Scripture and Nature.
        • 2. Scripture and Rationalism.
        • 3. Scripture and Mysticism.
        • 4. Scripture and Romanism.
      • 1. Scripture and Nature.
      • 2. Scripture and Rationalism.
      • 3. Scripture and Mysticism.
      • 4. Scripture and Romanism.
      • II. Limitations of Theology.
      • III. Relations of Material to Progress in Theology.
    • I. Sources of Theology.
      • 1. Scripture and Nature.
      • 2. Scripture and Rationalism.
      • 3. Scripture and Mysticism.
      • 4. Scripture and Romanism.
    • 1. Scripture and Nature.
    • 2. Scripture and Rationalism.
    • 3. Scripture and Mysticism.
    • 4. Scripture and Romanism.
    • II. Limitations of Theology.
    • III. Relations of Material to Progress in Theology.
    • Chapter III. Method Of Theology.
      • I. Requisites to the study of Theology.
      • II. Divisions of Theology.
      • III. History of Systematic Theology.
      • IV. Order of Treatment in Systematic Theology.
      • V. Text-Books in Theology.
    • I. Requisites to the study of Theology.
    • II. Divisions of Theology.
    • III. History of Systematic Theology.
    • IV. Order of Treatment in Systematic Theology.
    • V. Text-Books in Theology.
  • Part II. The Existence Of God.
    • Chapter I. Origin Of Our Idea Of God's Existence.
      • I. First Truths in General.
      • II. The Existence of God a first truth.
        • 1. Its universality.
        • 2. Its necessity.
        • 3. Its logical independence and priority.
      • 1. Its universality.
      • 2. Its necessity.
      • 3. Its logical independence and priority.
      • III. Other Supposed Sources of our Idea of God's Existence.
      • IV. Contents of this Intuition.
    • I. First Truths in General.
    • II. The Existence of God a first truth.
      • 1. Its universality.
      • 2. Its necessity.
      • 3. Its logical independence and priority.
    • 1. Its universality.
    • 2. Its necessity.
    • 3. Its logical independence and priority.
    • III. Other Supposed Sources of our Idea of God's Existence.
    • IV. Contents of this Intuition.
    • Chapter II. Corroborative Evidences Of God's Existence.
      • I. The Cosmological Argument, or Argument from Change in Nature.
      • II. The Teleological Argument, or Argument from Order and Useful Collocation in Nature.
      • III. The Anthropological Argument, or Argument from Man's Mental and Moral Nature.
      • IV. The Ontological Argument, or Argument from our Abstract and Necessary Ideas.
    • I. The Cosmological Argument, or Argument from Change in Nature.
    • II. The Teleological Argument, or Argument from Order and Useful Collocation in Nature.
    • III. The Anthropological Argument, or Argument from Man's Mental and Moral Nature.
    • IV. The Ontological Argument, or Argument from our Abstract and Necessary Ideas.
    • Chapter III. Erroneous Explanations, And Conclusion.
      • I. Materialism.
      • II. Materialistic Idealism.
      • III. Idealistic Pantheism.
      • IV. Ethical Monism.
    • I. Materialism.
    • II. Materialistic Idealism.
    • III. Idealistic Pantheism.
    • IV. Ethical Monism.
  • Part III. The Scriptures A Revelation From God.
    • Chapter I. Preliminary Considerations.
      • I. Reasons a priori for expecting a Revelation from God.
      • II. Marks of the Revelation man may expect.
      • III. Miracles, as attesting a Divine Revelation.
        • 1. Definition of Miracle.
        • 2. Possibility of Miracle.
        • 3. Probability of Miracles.
        • 4. Amount of Testimony necessary to prove a Miracle.
        • 5. Evidential force of Miracles.
        • 6. Counterfeit Miracles.
      • 1. Definition of Miracle.
      • 2. Possibility of Miracle.
      • 3. Probability of Miracles.
      • 4. Amount of Testimony necessary to prove a Miracle.
      • 5. Evidential force of Miracles.
      • 6. Counterfeit Miracles.
      • IV. Prophecy as Attesting a Divine Revelation.
      • V. Principles of Historical Evidence applicable to the Proof of a Divine Revelation.
        • 1. As to documentary evidence.
        • 2. As to testimony in general.
      • 1. As to documentary evidence.
      • 2. As to testimony in general.
    • I. Reasons a priori for expecting a Revelation from God.
    • II. Marks of the Revelation man may expect.
    • III. Miracles, as attesting a Divine Revelation.
      • 1. Definition of Miracle.
      • 2. Possibility of Miracle.
      • 3. Probability of Miracles.
      • 4. Amount of Testimony necessary to prove a Miracle.
      • 5. Evidential force of Miracles.
      • 6. Counterfeit Miracles.
    • 1. Definition of Miracle.
    • 2. Possibility of Miracle.
    • 3. Probability of Miracles.
    • 4. Amount of Testimony necessary to prove a Miracle.
    • 5. Evidential force of Miracles.
    • 6. Counterfeit Miracles.
    • IV. Prophecy as Attesting a Divine Revelation.
    • V. Principles of Historical Evidence applicable to the Proof of a Divine Revelation.
      • 1. As to documentary evidence.
      • 2. As to testimony in general.
    • 1. As to documentary evidence.
    • 2. As to testimony in general.
    • Chapter II. Positive Proofs That The Scriptures Are A Divine Revelation.
      • I. Genuineness of the Christian Documents.
        • 1. Genuineness of the Books of the New Testament.
        • 2. Genuineness of the Books of the Old Testament.
      • 1. Genuineness of the Books of the New Testament.
      • 2. Genuineness of the Books of the Old Testament.
      • II. Credibility of the Writers of the Scriptures.
      • III. The Supernatural Character of the Scripture Teaching.
        • 1. Scripture teaching in general.
        • 2. Moral System of the New Testament.
        • 3. The person and character of Christ.
        • 4. The testimony of Christ to himself—as being a messenger from God and as being one with God.
      • 1. Scripture teaching in general.
      • 2. Moral System of the New Testament.
      • 3. The person and character of Christ.
      • 4. The testimony of Christ to himself—as being a messenger from God and as being one with God.
      • IV. The Historical Results of the Propagation of Scripture Doctrine.
    • I. Genuineness of the Christian Documents.
      • 1. Genuineness of the Books of the New Testament.
      • 2. Genuineness of the Books of the Old Testament.
    • 1. Genuineness of the Books of the New Testament.
    • 2. Genuineness of the Books of the Old Testament.
    • II. Credibility of the Writers of the Scriptures.
    • III. The Supernatural Character of the Scripture Teaching.
      • 1. Scripture teaching in general.
      • 2. Moral System of the New Testament.
      • 3. The person and character of Christ.
      • 4. The testimony of Christ to himself—as being a messenger from God and as being one with God.
    • 1. Scripture teaching in general.
    • 2. Moral System of the New Testament.
    • 3. The person and character of Christ.
    • 4. The testimony of Christ to himself—as being a messenger from God and as being one with God.
    • IV. The Historical Results of the Propagation of Scripture Doctrine.
    • Chapter III. Inspiration Of The Scriptures.
      • I. Definition of Inspiration.
      • II. Proof of Inspiration.
      • III. Theories of Inspiration.
        • 1. The Intuition-theory.
        • 2. The Illumination Theory.
        • 3. The Dictation-theory.
        • 4. The Dynamical Theory.
      • 1. The Intuition-theory.
      • 2. The Illumination Theory.
      • 3. The Dictation-theory.
      • 4. The Dynamical Theory.
      • IV. The Union of the Divine and Human Elements in Inspiration.
      • V. Objections to the Doctrine of Inspiration.
        • 1. Errors in matters of Science.
        • 2. Errors in matters of History.
        • 3. Errors in Morality.
        • 4. Errors of Reasoning.
        • 5. Errors in quoting or interpreting the Old Testament.
        • 6. Errors in Prophecy.
        • 7. Certain books unworthy of a place in inspired Scripture.
      • 1. Errors in matters of Science.
      • 2. Errors in matters of History.
      • 3. Errors in Morality.
      • 4. Errors of Reasoning.
      • 5. Errors in quoting or interpreting the Old Testament.
      • 6. Errors in Prophecy.
      • 7. Certain books unworthy of a place in inspired Scripture.
    • I. Definition of Inspiration.
    • II. Proof of Inspiration.
    • III. Theories of Inspiration.
      • 1. The Intuition-theory.
      • 2. The Illumination Theory.
      • 3. The Dictation-theory.
      • 4. The Dynamical Theory.
    • 1. The Intuition-theory.
    • 2. The Illumination Theory.
    • 3. The Dictation-theory.
    • 4. The Dynamical Theory.
    • IV. The Union of the Divine and Human Elements in Inspiration.
    • V. Objections to the Doctrine of Inspiration.
      • 1. Errors in matters of Science.
      • 2. Errors in matters of History.
      • 3. Errors in Morality.
      • 4. Errors of Reasoning.
      • 5. Errors in quoting or interpreting the Old Testament.
      • 6. Errors in Prophecy.
      • 7. Certain books unworthy of a place in inspired Scripture.
    • 1. Errors in matters of Science.
    • 2. Errors in matters of History.
    • 3. Errors in Morality.
    • 4. Errors of Reasoning.
    • 5. Errors in quoting or interpreting the Old Testament.
    • 6. Errors in Prophecy.
    • 7. Certain books unworthy of a place in inspired Scripture.
  • Part IV. The Nature, Decrees, And Works Of God.
    • Chapter I. The Attributes Of God.
      • I. Definition of the term Attributes.
      • II. Relation of the divine Attributes to the divine Essence.
      • III. Methods of determining the divine Attributes.
      • IV. Classification of the Attributes.
      • V. Absolute or Immanent Attributes.
        • First division.—Spirituality, and attributes therein involved.
        • Second Division.—Infinity, and attributes therein involved.
        • Third Division.—Perfection, and attributes therein involved.
      • First division.—Spirituality, and attributes therein involved.
      • Second Division.—Infinity, and attributes therein involved.
      • Third Division.—Perfection, and attributes therein involved.
      • VI. Relative or Transitive Attributes.
        • First Division.—Attributes having relation to Time and Space.
        • Second Division.—Attributes having relation to Creation.
        • Third Division.—Attributes having relation to Moral Beings.
      • First Division.—Attributes having relation to Time and Space.
      • Second Division.—Attributes having relation to Creation.
      • Third Division.—Attributes having relation to Moral Beings.
      • VII. Rank and Relations of the several Attributes.
        • 1. Holiness the fundamental attribute in God.
        • 2. The holiness of God the ground of moral obligation.
      • 1. Holiness the fundamental attribute in God.
      • 2. The holiness of God the ground of moral obligation.
    • I. Definition of the term Attributes.
    • II. Relation of the divine Attributes to the divine Essence.
    • III. Methods of determining the divine Attributes.
    • IV. Classification of the Attributes.
    • V. Absolute or Immanent Attributes.
      • First division.—Spirituality, and attributes therein involved.
      • Second Division.—Infinity, and attributes therein involved.
      • Third Division.—Perfection, and attributes therein involved.
    • First division.—Spirituality, and attributes therein involved.
    • Second Division.—Infinity, and attributes therein involved.
    • Third Division.—Perfection, and attributes therein involved.
    • VI. Relative or Transitive Attributes.
      • First Division.—Attributes having relation to Time and Space.
      • Second Division.—Attributes having relation to Creation.
      • Third Division.—Attributes having relation to Moral Beings.
    • First Division.—Attributes having relation to Time and Space.
    • Second Division.—Attributes having relation to Creation.
    • Third Division.—Attributes having relation to Moral Beings.
    • VII. Rank and Relations of the several Attributes.
      • 1. Holiness the fundamental attribute in God.
      • 2. The holiness of God the ground of moral obligation.
    • 1. Holiness the fundamental attribute in God.
    • 2. The holiness of God the ground of moral obligation.
    • Chapter II. Doctrine Of The Trinity.
      • I. In Scriptures there are Three who are recognized as God.
        • 1. Proofs from the New Testament.
        • 2. Intimations of the Old Testament.
      • 1. Proofs from the New Testament.
      • 2. Intimations of the Old Testament.
      • II. These Three are so described in Scripture that we are compelled to conceive of them as distinct Persons.
        • 1. The Father and the Son are persons distinct from each other.
        • 2. The Father and the Son are persons distinct from the Spirit.
        • 3. The Holy Spirit is a person.
      • 1. The Father and the Son are persons distinct from each other.
      • 2. The Father and the Son are persons distinct from the Spirit.
      • 3. The Holy Spirit is a person.
      • III. This Tripersonality of the Divine Nature is not merely economic and temporal, but is immanent and eternal.
        • 1. Scripture proof that these distinctions of personality are eternal.
        • 2. Errors refuted by the foregoing passages.
      • 1. Scripture proof that these distinctions of personality are eternal.
      • 2. Errors refuted by the foregoing passages.
      • IV. This Tripersonality is not Tritheism; for, while there are three Persons, there is but one Essence.
      • V. The Three Persons, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, are equal.
        • 1. These titles belong to the Persons.
        • 2. Qualified sense of these titles.
        • 3. Generation and procession consistent with equality.
      • 1. These titles belong to the Persons.
      • 2. Qualified sense of these titles.
      • 3. Generation and procession consistent with equality.
      • VI. Inscrutable, yet not self-contradictory, this Doctrine furnishes the Key to all other Doctrines.
        • 1. The mode of this triune existence is inscrutable.
        • 2. The Doctrine of the Trinity is not self-contradictory.
        • 3. The doctrine of the Trinity has important relations to other doctrines.
      • 1. The mode of this triune existence is inscrutable.
      • 2. The Doctrine of the Trinity is not self-contradictory.
      • 3. The doctrine of the Trinity has important relations to other doctrines.
    • I. In Scriptures there are Three who are recognized as God.
      • 1. Proofs from the New Testament.
      • 2. Intimations of the Old Testament.
    • 1. Proofs from the New Testament.
    • 2. Intimations of the Old Testament.
    • II. These Three are so described in Scripture that we are compelled to conceive of them as distinct Persons.
      • 1. The Father and the Son are persons distinct from each other.
      • 2. The Father and the Son are persons distinct from the Spirit.
      • 3. The Holy Spirit is a person.
    • 1. The Father and the Son are persons distinct from each other.
    • 2. The Father and the Son are persons distinct from the Spirit.
    • 3. The Holy Spirit is a person.
    • III. This Tripersonality of the Divine Nature is not merely economic and temporal, but is immanent and eternal.
      • 1. Scripture proof that these distinctions of personality are eternal.
      • 2. Errors refuted by the foregoing passages.
    • 1. Scripture proof that these distinctions of personality are eternal.
    • 2. Errors refuted by the foregoing passages.
    • IV. This Tripersonality is not Tritheism; for, while there are three Persons, there is but one Essence.
    • V. The Three Persons, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, are equal.
      • 1. These titles belong to the Persons.
      • 2. Qualified sense of these titles.
      • 3. Generation and procession consistent with equality.
    • 1. These titles belong to the Persons.
    • 2. Qualified sense of these titles.
    • 3. Generation and procession consistent with equality.
    • VI. Inscrutable, yet not self-contradictory, this Doctrine furnishes the Key to all other Doctrines.
      • 1. The mode of this triune existence is inscrutable.
      • 2. The Doctrine of the Trinity is not self-contradictory.
      • 3. The doctrine of the Trinity has important relations to other doctrines.
    • 1. The mode of this triune existence is inscrutable.
    • 2. The Doctrine of the Trinity is not self-contradictory.
    • 3. The doctrine of the Trinity has important relations to other doctrines.
    • Chapter III. The Decrees Of God.
      • I. Definition of Decrees.
      • II. Proof of the Doctrine of Decrees.
        • 1. From Scripture.
        • 2. From Reason.
      • 1. From Scripture.
      • 2. From Reason.
      • III. Objections to the Doctrine of Decrees.
        • 1. That they are inconsistent with the free agency of man.
        • 2. That they take away all motive for human exertion.
        • 3. That they make God the author of sin.
      • 1. That they are inconsistent with the free agency of man.
      • 2. That they take away all motive for human exertion.
      • 3. That they make God the author of sin.
      • IV. Concluding Remarks.
        • 1. Practical uses of the doctrine of decrees.
        • 2. True method of preaching the doctrine.
      • 1. Practical uses of the doctrine of decrees.
      • 2. True method of preaching the doctrine.
    • I. Definition of Decrees.
    • II. Proof of the Doctrine of Decrees.
      • 1. From Scripture.
      • 2. From Reason.
    • 1. From Scripture.
    • 2. From Reason.
    • III. Objections to the Doctrine of Decrees.
      • 1. That they are inconsistent with the free agency of man.
      • 2. That they take away all motive for human exertion.
      • 3. That they make God the author of sin.
    • 1. That they are inconsistent with the free agency of man.
    • 2. That they take away all motive for human exertion.
    • 3. That they make God the author of sin.
    • IV. Concluding Remarks.
      • 1. Practical uses of the doctrine of decrees.
      • 2. True method of preaching the doctrine.
    • 1. Practical uses of the doctrine of decrees.
    • 2. True method of preaching the doctrine.
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