Guernsey Folk Lore a collection of popular superstitions, legendary tales, peculiar customs, proverbs, weather sayings, etc., of the people of that island
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Guernsey Folk Lore a collection of popular superstitions, legendary tales, peculiar customs, proverbs, weather sayings, etc., of the people of that island

By Edgar MacCulloch
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • GUERNSEY FOLK-LORE.
  • AUTHOR’S PREFACE.
  • EDITOR’S PREFACE.
  • CONTENTS.
  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
  • ERRATA.
  • Part I. Times and Seasons, Festivals and Merry-makings.
    • CHAPTER I. Festival Customs.
      • A Guernseyman Three Centuries Ago.
      • La Longue Veille.
      • Christmas and New Year.
      • La Grand’ Querrue.
      • Shrove Tuesday.
      • The First Sunday in Lent.
      • Good Friday.
      • Easter.
      • The First of April.
      • Sundays in May.
      • Whitsuntide.
      • Midsummer.
      • Midsummer Day in Sark.
      • Midsummer Day in Jersey.
      • August.
      • September.
    • CHAPTER II. Local Customs—Civic, Aquatic, Ceremonial.
      • La Chevanchée de St. Michel.
      • “Briser La Hanse.”
      • Local Customs—Aquatic.
      • Local Customs—Ceremonial.
      • Birth and Baptism.
      • Betrothals and Weddings.
      • Deaths and Funerals.
  • Part II. Superstitious Belief and Practice.
    • CHAPTER III. Prehistoric Monuments; and their Superstitions.
      • “L’Autel des Vardes” at L’Ancresse.
      • “La Roque Balan.”
      • “La Roque qui Sonne.”
      • “Le Tombeau du Grand Sarrazin.”
      • “L’Autel de Déhus.”
      • “Le Trépied, or the Catioroc.”
      • “Le Creux es Faïes.”
      • “La Longue Roque” or “Palette es Faïes.”
      • “La Roque des Faïes.”
      • “Le Gibet des Faïes.”
      • Old Figures in the Churchyards of St. Martin’s and the Castel.
    • CHAPTER IV. Natural Objects and their Superstitions.
      • Le Creux des Fées.
      • Le Creux Mahié.
      • Rocks and Stones.
      • “Le Pied du Bœuf.”
      • “The Devil’s Claw” at Jerbourg.
      • “Le Pont du Diable.”
      • “The Lovers’ Leap.”
    • CHAPTER V. Holy Chapels and Holy Wells.
      • Holy Wells.
      • Le Poulain de Saint George.
      • A Legend of St. George’s Well.
      • Maidens at St. George’s Well.
    • CHAPTER VI. Fairies.
      • Popular Notions about Fairies.
      • The Invasion of Guernsey by the Fairies.
      • The Fairies and the Nurse.
      • The Fairies and the Midwife.
      • The Broken Kettle.
      • Fairy Neighbours.
      • “Le Petit Colin.”
      • The Fairy Bakers.
      • The Changeling.
      • Building of the Castel Church.
      • The Guernsey Lily.
      • Mermaids.
    • CHAPTER VII. Demons and Goblins.
      • Le Faeu Bélengier.
      • Hidden Treasures.
      • “The Varou.”
      • Herodias.
      • “Le Barboue.”[120]
      • Spectral Appearances.
      • “Tchi-co, La Bête de la Tour.”
      • “Le Chien Bôdu.”
      • Legend of the Ville au Roi.
      • The Spectre of Les Grentmaisons.
      • “La Bête de La Pendue.”
      • The Dole of Loaves at Le Laurier.
      • The Enchanted Horse.
      • The Spectral Cortège.
    • CHAPTER VIII. The Devil.
      • Satan Outwitted.
      • Satan and the Schoolmaster.
      • Another Version of “Satan and the Schoolmaster.”
      • The Devil and the Tailor.
      • Recent Appearance of the Devil.
    • CHAPTER IX. Prophetic Warnings and Ghosts.
      • Prophetic Warnings.
      • Ghosts.
      • The Robber of the Poor Box.
      • Burial of the Drowned.
      • “La Grand’ Garce.”
      • “La Fllieur de Jaon.”
    • CHAPTER X. Witchcraft.
      • Trials for Witchcraft, and Confessions of Witches.
      • Wizards and Witches.
      • The Aerial Journey.
      • The Countrywoman and the Witch.
      • Magic Books.
      • The Prior of Lihou.
      • A Wizard on the West Coast.
      • The Wizard’s Death.
      • The Witch of Caubo.[180]
      • The Witch of the Ville-ès-Pies.[182]
      • The Sick Princess and the Wizards.
      • A Witch in Disguise.
      • Collas Roussé.[186]
      • The Miller and the Duck.
      • Mahy de la Catte.
      • Two Witches and Two Cats.
      • The Transformed Wizard.
      • La Dame au Voile.
      • Case of a Man who was Bewitched.
      • Jean Falla and the Witches.
      • The Bladebone.
      • A Witch’s Foresight.
      • Fortune Telling.
    • CHAPTER XI. Charms, Spells, and Incantations.
      • To Remove any kind of Spell, and Cause the Person who has Cast it to Appear.
      • Another Method.
      • Another Means of Causing a Sorcerer to Shew Himself.
      • To Avert all Sorts of Spells and Enchantments.
      • A Preservative against Spells, to be Hung Round the Neck.
      • To Win at Play
      • To Make Peace between Men who are Fighting.
      • To Stop Bleeding.
      • To Cure a Burn.
      • To Stop a Fire that is Burning a House.
      • To Cause a Person to Love You.
      • Another Means.
      • To Prevent a Sportsman from Killing any Game.
      • To Cure a Horse that has the Vives or the Gripes.[202]
      • Another Form.
      • To Remove a Fish Bone from the Throat.
      • To Prevent a Dog from Barking or Biting.
      • Quick-Silver a Protection against Witchcraft.
      • The Cure of Warts, etc.
      • Celts.
      • Another Counter-Charm for Witchcraft.
      • The Seigneur of St. George and the Désorcelleur.
      • Love Spells.
      • The Consequences of a Love Spell.
      • Witches and the White-Thorn.
      • Divining Rod.
      • Bees Put in Mourning.
    • CHAPTER XII. Folk Medicine and Leech Craft.
      • King’s Evil.
    • CHAPTER XIII. Story Telling.
      • How the Men of Alderney Sowed, and What Came of It.
      • How the Jerseymen Attempted To Carry Off Guernsey.
      • The Jersey Gallows.
      • Proverbial Stories.
      • Le Raté.
      • Le Cotillon de Raché Catel.
      • The Cat and the Fox. A Fable.
      • The Farm Servant and the Weeds.
    • CHAPTER XIV. Historical Reminiscences.
      • Cadwalla and Brian.
      • Duke Richard of Normandy and the Demon.
      • Archbishop Mauger.
      • The Ballad of Ivon de Galles.
      • The Recapture of Sark.
      • The Alarm of Pulias.
      • Jean Breton, the Pilot.
    • CHAPTER XV. Nursery Rhymes and Children’s Games.
      • Children’s Game.
      • Children’s Game.
      • Children’s “Counting-out” Rhyme.
      • Another.
      • Another.
      • Others.
      • Another Version.
      • Another.
      • Nurses’ Rhymes.
      • Another Version.
      • When it Snows.
      • Cradle Songs.
      • Another Version.
      • Dancing Rhymes.
      • Sark Games.
    • CHAPTER XVI. Superstitions Generally.
      • Cuckoo Rhymes.
      • Guernsey Local Nick-Names.
      • Guernsey Parish Nick-Names.
    • CHAPTER XVII. Proverbs, Weather Sayings, etc.
      • Proverbs.
      • Popular Sayings.
      • Proverbial Sayings.
      • Agricultural Sayings.
      • Piscatory and Maritime Sayings.
      • Various Sayings.
      • Weather Proverbs, Etc.
  • Part III. Editor’s Appendix.
    • CHAPTER XVIII. Guernsey Songs and Ballads.
      • Yvon de Galles.
      • L’Armée d’Espagne, Defaitte en L’an 1588.
      • Secular Poems.
      • The Clameur de Haro.
    • APPENDIX A. Ghosts.
      • The Ghost of Mr. Blondel.
      • The Old House at St. George.
      • The Ghosts of La Petite Porte.
      • Le Seigneur de Damèque.
      • Les Câches.
    • APPENDIX B. Witchcraft.
      • Marie Pipet.
      • The Wizard of Sark.
      • The Witch of Alderney.
      • The Witch and the Raven.
    • APPENDIX C. Charms and Spells.
      • St. Thomas’ Day.
      • Midsummer Eve.
      • L’Ettre Miraculeuse.
  • Index.
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