Design and Tradition
Free

Design and Tradition

By Amor Fenn
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • DESIGN AND TRADITION
  • AUTHOR’S PREFACE
  • CONTENTS
  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
  • CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY
    • Human Limitations
    • “Inspiration”
    • Process and Material
    • Early Training
    • Art and Existence
    • “Natural Taste”
    • Commercial Production
    • “Ornaments”
    • Modern Development
    • Public Apathy
    • Elementary Pattern
    • Early Impressionism
    • Personal Production
    • Early Social Conditions
    • Influence
    • Commercial Intercourse.
    • Effect on Design
    • Ethical Side of Art
    • Desire for Novelty
  • CHAPTER II HISTORIC REVIEW
    • Style.
    • Inter-Communication
    • Climate and Material
    • Phases in Style
    • The Lintel
    • The Arch
    • Egyptian
    • Chaldean
    • Greek
    • Roman
    • Vaulting
    • Greek Influence
    • Development of Ornament
    • Græco-Roman Painted Decoration
    • Domes
    • Early Christian Art
    • Metal Work and Enamel
    • Roman Influence Abroad
    • Romanesque Style
    • Church Development
    • Dark Ages
    • Crusades
    • Pointed Arch
    • Gothic Style
    • Phases of Gothic
    • Early Pointed
    • Decorated Gothic
    • Perpendicular Gothic
    • Glass Windows
    • Civic Influences
    • Effect of Commerce
    • Italy
    • Foreign Influence in England
    • The House
    • The Reformation
    • Renaissance
    • Early Exponents
    • Rome
    • Venice
    • Venetian Influence
    • Painted Decoration
    • Græco-Roman Influence
    • Early French Renaissance
    • Native Exploitation
    • English Renaissance
    • Italians in England
    • Study of Classic Style
    • Thomas Thorpe
    • Flemish Influence
    • Jacobean
    • Development in Dwellings
    • Evolution of Professional Designer
    • Inigo Jones
    • Louis XIII
    • Louis XIV
    • "Boule” Work
    • Mirrors
    • Louis XV
    • Régence
    • Rococo
    • Lacquer “Vernis Martin"
    • Later English Renaissances
    • Sir Christopher Wren
    • Classic Spires
    • Dutch and French Influences
    • Queen Anne Period
    • Early Georgian
    • Chippendale
    • Mayhew
    • Adam Style
    • Hepplewhite
    • Sheraton
    • Louis XVI
    • Riesener and Gouthière
    • Empire
    • Empire in England
    • Later English Architecture
    • French Influence on Europe
  • CHAPTER III MOULDINGS
    • Purpose
    • The Fillet
    • Sheltering Mouldings
    • The Cavetto
    • Cyma Recta
    • Bracketing Mouldings
    • The Ovolo
    • Cyma Reversa
    • Binding Mouldings
    • The Torus
    • The Scotia
    • The Facia
    • Decoration of Mouldings
    • Orthodox Details
    • Angle Leaf
    • Dentils
    • Employment
    • Attitude
    • Wood Panelling
    • Applied Mouldings
    • Bolection Moulding
    • Plaster
    • Wood-turning
    • Metal Turning
    • Pottery
    • Metal Mouldings
    • Wrought Iron
    • Silver-work
    • Spinning
    • Repoussé
  • CHAPTER IV ARCHITECTURAL PROPORTIONS
    • Introduction
    • System of Proportion
    • The Order
    • Doric Order
    • Ionic Order
    • Corinthian Order
    • Doric Entablatures
    • Mutules
    • Ionic Entablature
    • Corinthian Entablature
    • The Column—The Shaft
    • The Capital
    • Doric Capital
    • Ionic Capital
    • To Draw the Volute
    • Corinthian Capital
    • The Base
    • Doric Base
    • Ionic Base
    • Corinthian Base
    • The Arch
    • Doric Impost
    • Archivolt
    • Ionic Impost
    • Ionic Archivolt
    • Corinthian Impost
    • Corinthian Archivolt
    • The Keystone
    • The Pedestal
    • Doric Pedestal
    • Ionic Pedestal
    • Corinthian Pedestal
    • The Baluster
    • Spacing of Balusters
    • Balustrading
    • Use of Columns
    • Disposition and Spacing in Colonnades
    • Orders Above Orders
    • The Pilaster
    • Arcades
    • Subsidiary Order
    • Superimposed Orders
    • Rustication
    • Basement
    • Attic
    • The Pediment
    • Doors
    • Windows
  • CHAPTER V DIVISION OF SURFACE
    • Wall Treatment
    • Ceilings
    • Jacobean
    • Carolean and Georgian
    • Adam Ceilings
    • Vaults and Domes
    • The Cove
    • The Frieze
    • Borders
    • Geometric Elements
    • The Undulate Line
    • Repetition and Alternation
    • Treatment of Angles
    • Pilaster Treatment
    • Panelled Pilasters
    • Capitals and Bases
    • Treatment of Panels
    • Juxtaposition
    • The Growth Line
    • Grouping and Massing
    • Division of Area
    • Human and Animal Life
    • Forms in the Round
    • Supports and Balusters
    • Standards
    • Proportion
    • Positions for Decoration
    • Working Drawings
    • The Segment or Stretch Out
  • CHAPTER VI DEVELOPMENT OF CONVENTIONAL ORNAMENT
    • Outline Drawing
    • Undesirable Realism
    • Craft Restrictions
    • Materialistic Influence
    • Early Renderings
    • The Anthemion
    • Greek Sculptured Ornament
    • Acanthus Leaf
    • Roman Development
    • The Scroll
    • Græco-Roman
    • Byzantine
    • Romanesque
    • Italian Renaissance
    • The Husk Leaf
    • The Rosette
    • Tendrils
    • Nature Influence
    • Symbolic Employment
    • Consistency in Growth
    • Branching
    • Leaves
    • The Start
    • Renaissance Influence
    • Jacobean.
    • Régence
    • Rococo
    • Louis XVI
    • Grinling Gibbons School of Carving
    • Adam Style
    • Empire
    • System of the Acanthus Leaf
  • CHAPTER VII TREATMENT IN DESIGN
    • Natural Attraction
    • Decorative Materials
    • Justification of Treatment
    • Undesirable Imitation
    • Technical Considerations
    • Methods of Expression
    • Treatment of Leaves
    • Surface Interest
    • Painted Decoration
    • Stencilled Work
    • Mechanical Production, Printed and Woven
    • Needlework
    • Appliqué
    • Lace
    • Wood Inlay
    • Intarsia
    • Veneer, Marquetry
    • Boule Work
    • Mosaic
    • Byzantine Use of Marble
    • Book Decoration
    • Bindings
    • Relief—Economic Result of Method
    • Desirable Treatment in Carving
    • Backgrounds
    • Reproduction Processes
    • Metal Repoussé
    • Metal, Cast
    • Character of Cast Work
  • CHAPTER VIII MYTHOLOGY AND SYMBOLISM
    • Early Symbolic Ornament
    • Customs
    • Origin of Mythology
    • Nature Myths
    • Light and Darkness
    • Melanesian Myth
    • Darkness as a Devouring Monster
    • Season Myths
    • Sun Myths
    • Belief in Natural Phenomena
    • Greek and Roman Deities
    • Scandinavian Mythology
    • Rising and Setting Symbolised
    • Winds Personified
    • Predestination
    • The Fates
    • Propitiation and Sacrifice
    • Early Burial Customs
    • Taboo
    • Roman Lares
    • Typical Legend
    • Early Spiritual Belief
    • Prehistoric Treatment of Epileptics
    • Prohibition
    • Belief in Magical Qualities.
    • The Shirt of Nessus
    • Swords
    • Invulnerability
    • Belief in Numbers
    • Muses
    • Sacred Trees and Flowers, etc.
    • Sacred Animals
    • Evangelist Symbols
    • The Serpent
    • The Dragon
    • Poetic License in Tradition
    • Animals in Christian Art
    • Association of Human and Animal Qualities
    • Totemism
    • Cannibalism
    • The Sphinx
    • Assyrian Winged Monsters
    • Pegasus
    • The Harpy
    • Sirens
    • Pan
    • The Nymphs
    • Centaur
    • The Circle
    • Symbols of the Trinity
    • The Wand a Symbol of Authority
    • The Hand
    • The Caduceus
    • Thyrsus
    • The Trident
    • The Cross
    • The Pastoral Staff
    • Symbols of Martyrdom
    • Symbolism of Gems, etc.
    • Masks
    • Symbols of Time
    • Secular Symbols
    • Trophies
    • Heraldry
    • Heraldry in Design
    • Symbolism in Modern Art
    • Present Apathy
  • CHAPTER IX WAYS AND MEANS
    • Perception
    • Accepted Conventions
    • Influence of Fashion
    • Harmonious Consistency
    • Natural Suggestion
    • Colour Scheme
    • Early Training
    • Nature Study
    • Aspect and Attitude
    • Treatment
    • Drawings for Reproduction
    • Opaque Colour
    • Enlarging and Reducing
    • Textiles
    • Wallpapers
    • Architectural Drawings
    • Structural Design
    • Lucid Arrangement
    • Mathematical Equipment
    • Use of the Ruling Pen
    • Proportional Compass
    • Tracings
    • Conclusion
  • INDEX
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