Triumphs and Wonders of the 19th Century
The True Mirror of a Phenomenal Era
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Triumphs and Wonders of the 19th Century The True Mirror of a Phenomenal Era

By James P. Boyd
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • Triumphs and Wonders OF THE 19th Century
  • INTRODUCTORY
  • AUTHORS AND SUBJECTS
  • ANALYSIS OF CONTENTS
  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
  • WONDERS OF ELECTRICITY By JAMES P. BOYD, A.M., L.B.
    • I. AT THE DAWN OF THE CENTURY.
    • II. THE NEW NINETEENTH CENTURY ELECTRICITY.
    • III. THE TELEGRAPH.
    • IV. HELLO! HELLO!
    • V. DYNAMO AND MOTOR.
    • VI. “AND THERE WAS LIGHT.”
    • VII. ELECTRIC LOCOMOTION.
    • VIII. THE X RAY.
    • IX. OTHER ELECTRICAL WONDERS.
    • X. ELECTRICAL LANGUAGE.
  • THE CENTURY’S NAVAL PROGRESS By REAR ADMIRAL GEORGE WALLACE MELVILLE, U. S. N.
    • I. INFLUENCE OF SEA POWER.
    • II. THE CENTURY’S GROWTH IN NAVAL STRENGTH.
    • III. THE BATTLESHIP,—PAST AND PRESENT.
    • IV. THE PROGRESS OF NAVAL ENGINEERING.
    • V. THE GROWTH OF ORDNANCE.
    • VI. THE DEVELOPMENT OF ARMOR.
    • VII. THE RAM AND THE TORPEDO.
    • VIII. THE UNITED STATES FLEET.
  • ASTRONOMY DURING THE CENTURY By SELDEN J. COFFIN, A.M., Professor of Astronomy, Lafayette College, Easton, Pa. ITS PROGRESS, ACHIEVEMENTS, AND NOTABLE RESULTS
    • I. ASTRONOMY A CENTURY AGO.
    • II. HOW “BODE’S LAW” PROMOTED RESEARCH.
    • III. HOW NEPTUNE WAS FOUND.
    • IV. METEORITES.
    • V. DO METEORS OFTEN STRIKE THE EARTH?
    • VI. ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORIES.
    • VII. IMPROVED INSTRUMENTS; THEIR EFFECT ON THE SCIENCE.
    • VIII. THE SPECTROSCOPE AND ITS TRIUMPHS.
    • IX. WHAT IS DONE IN A LARGE OBSERVATORY; ITS WORK.
    • X. THE NATIONAL OBSERVATORY AT WASHINGTON.
    • XI. STAR MAPS AND CATALOGUES.
    • XII. ASTRONOMICAL BOOKS AND THEIR WRITERS.
    • XIII. THE PRACTICAL USES OF ASTRONOMY AS AN AID TO NAVIGATION AND GEODESY.
    • XIV. NOTABLE EPOCHS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.
    • XV. DISCARDED DOCTRINES AND ABANDONED IDEAS.
    • XVI. PROBLEMS FOR FUTURE STUDY.
  • STORY OF PLANT AND FLOWER By THOMAS MEEHAN, Vice President Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia.
  • PROGRESS OF WOMEN WITHIN THE CENTURY By MARY ELIZABETH LEASE, Ex-President Kansas State Board of Charities.
  • THE CENTURY’S TEXTILE PROGRESS By ROBERT P. HAINS, Examiner of Textiles, U. S. Patent Office.
  • THE CENTURY’S RELIGIOUS PROGRESS By GEORGE EDWARD REED, S.T.D., LL.D., President Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa.
  • GREAT GROWTH OF LIBRARIES By JAMES P. BOYD, A.M., L.B.
  • PROGRESS OF THE CENTURY IN ARCHITECTURE By WILLIAM MARTIN AIKEN, F.A.I.A., Former U. S. Supervising Architect.
  • THE CENTURY’S PROGRESS IN CHEMISTRY By HARVEY W. WILEY, M.D., PH.D., LL.D., Chief Chemist Agricultural Department, Washington, D. C.
    • I. INORGANIC AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY.
    • II. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY.
    • III. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
    • IV. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY.
    • V. SYNTHETICAL CHEMISTRY.
    • VI. METALLURGICAL CHEMISTRY.
    • VII. AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY.
    • VIII. GRAPHIC CHEMISTRY.
    • IX. DIDACTIC CHEMISTRY.
    • X. CHEMISTRY OF FERMENTATION.
    • XI. ELECTRO-CHEMISTRY.
    • CONCLUSION.
  • THE CENTURY’S MUSIC AND DRAMA By RITER FITZGERALD, A.M., Dramatic Critic “City Item,” Philadelphia.
    • I. MUSIC.
    • II. DRAMA.
  • THE CENTURY’S LITERATURE By JAMES P. BOYD, A.M., L.B.
  • THE RECORDS OF THE PAST By MORRIS JASTROW, JR., PH.D., Professor of Semitic Languages, University of Pennsylvania.
  • PROGRESS IN DAIRY FARMING By MAJOR HENRY E. ALVORD, C.E., LL.D., Chief of Dairy Division, U. S. Department of Agriculture.
  • THE CENTURY’S MORAL PROGRESS By SARA Y. STEVENSON, Sc. D., Secretary Department of Archæology, University of Pennsylvania.
  • PROGRESS OF SANITARY SCIENCE By CHARLES McINTIRE, A.M., M.D., Lecturer on Sanitary Science, Lafayette College, Easton, Pa.
  • THE CENTURY’S ARMIES AND ARMS By LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ARTHUR L. WAGNER, Assistant Adjutant General, U. S. Army.
  • THE CENTURY’S PROGRESS IN AGRICULTURE By WALDO F. BROWN, Agricultural Editor “Cincinnati Gazette.”
    • I. VICISSITUDES OF EARLY FARMING.
    • II. IMPROVEMENTS IN FARM IMPLEMENTS AND MACHINERY.
    • III. IMPROVEMENT OF STOCK.
    • IV. IMPROVEMENT IN FARMING METHODS.
    • V. IMPROVEMENT IN AND AROUND THE HOME.
    • VI. IMPROVEMENT IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.
    • A SUMMING UP.
  • PROGRESS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING By WALTER LORING WEBB, C.E., Assistant Prof. of Civil Engineering, University of Pennsylvania.
    • I. AN INTRODUCTORY VIEW.
    • II. BRIDGES.
    • III. CAISSONS.
    • IV. CANALS.
    • V. GEODESY.
    • VI. RAILROADS.
    • VII. TUNNELS.
  • THE CENTURY’S PROGRESS IN THE ANIMAL WORLD By D. E. SALMON, M.D., Chief of Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S. Agricultural Department.
    • I. OF ANIMAL DISEASES.
    • II. INCREASE IN NUMBERS.
    • III. IMPROVEMENT OF BREEDS OF ANIMALS.
  • LEADING WARS OF THE CENTURY By MAJOR GENERAL JOSEPH WHEELER, U. S. ARMY.
    • I. WARS OF THE UNITED STATES.
    • II. FOREIGN WARS.
  • THE CENTURY’S FAIRS AND EXPOSITIONS By GEORGE J. HAGAR, Editor of Appendix to Encyclopædia Britannica.
  • THE CENTURY’S PROGRESS IN COINAGE, CURRENCY, AND BANKING By HON. BRADFORD RHODES, Editor of “Banker’s Magazine.”
    • I. BANKS AND BANKING RESOURCES.
    • II. COINAGE AND PRODUCTION OF PRECIOUS METALS.
    • III. EARLY BANKING IN THE UNITED STATES.
    • IV. HISTORY OF THE LEGAL-TENDER NOTE.
    • V. THE NATIONAL BANKING SYSTEM.
    • VI. FOREIGN BANKING AND FINANCE.
    • VII. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT DEBT SINCE 1857.
    • VIII. POSTAL SAVINGS BANKS.
    • IX. SAVINGS BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES.
    • X. THE CLEARING-HOUSE.
    • XI. PANICS AND THEIR CAUSES.
  • THE CENTURY’S PROGRESS IN FRUIT CULTURE By H. E. VAN DEMAN, Late Prof. of Horticulture, Kansas State Agricultural College.
  • THE CENTURY’S COMMERCIAL PROGRESS By EMORY R. JOHNSON, A.M., Asst. Prof. of Transportation and Commerce, University of Pennsylvania.
    • I. MAIN FEATURES OF THE WORLD’S COMMERCE AT THE CLOSE OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.
    • II. THE CENTURY’S TECHNICAL REVOLUTION IN COMMERCE.
    • III. IMPROVEMENTS IN COMMERCIAL AUXILIARIES.
    • IV. EXPANSION OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE DURING THE CENTURY.
    • V. THE TRADE OF THE UNITED STATES DURING THE CENTURY.
    • VI. THE AMERICAN MARINE IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE.
    • VII. AMERICAN SHIPBUILDING.
    • VIII. CAUSES ACCOUNTING FOR THE CENTURY’S COMMERCIAL PROGRESS.
    • IX. THE TWENTIETH CENTURY PROSPECT.
  • EDUCATION DURING THE CENTURY By FRANKLIN S. EDMONDS, A.M., Asst. Prof. of Political Science, Central High School, Philadelphia.
  • “THE ART PRESERVATIVE” By THOMAS J. LINDSEY, Editorial Staff Philadelphia “Evening Bulletin.”
    • I. THE PRINTING PRESS.
    • II. THE SETTING OF TYPE.
    • III. EVENTS AS THEY OCCUR.
    • IV. TYPE-MAKING, STEREOTYPING, PICTURE-MAKING.
  • THE CENTURY’S PROGRESS IN MINES AND MINING By GEO. A. PACKARD, Metallurgist and Mining Engineer.
  • ART PROGRESS OF THE CENTURY By JOHN V. SEARS, Art Critic Philadelphia “Evening Telegraph.”
    • I. PAINTING
    • II. SCULPTURE.
    • III. CERAMICS AND GLASS WORK.
    • IV. INDUSTRIAL ARTS.
  • THE CENTURY’S ADVANCE IN SURGERY By J. MADISON TAYLOR, M.D., and J. H. GIBBON, M.D., Surgeon in Pennsylvania and Children’s Hospitals.
  • PROGRESS OF MEDICINE By FRANK C. HAMMOND, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia.
  • EVOLUTION OF THE RAILWAY By E. E. RUSSELL TRATMAN, C.E., Assistant Editor of “Engineering News,” Chicago.
  • ADVANCE IN LAW AND JUSTICE By LUTHER E. HEWITT, L.B., Librarian of Philadelphia Law Association.
  • EVOLUTION OF BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS By MICHAEL J. BROWN, Secretary of Building Association League of Penna.
    • I. GENERAL PRINCIPLES.
    • II. THE SYSTEM.
    • III. THEIR EARLY HISTORY.
    • IV. AMERICAN ASSOCIATIONS.
    • V. THE BANQUET.
  • EPOCH-MAKERS OF THE CENTURY By REV. A. LEFFINGWELL, Rector of Trinity Church, Toledo, Ohio.
  • Transcriber’s Notes
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