The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 — Volume 27 of 55
1636-37
Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, Showing the Political, Economic, Commercial and Religious Conditions of Those Islands from Their Earliest Relations with European Nations to the Close of the Nineteenth Century
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The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 — Volume 27 of 55 1636-37 Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, Showing the Political, Economic, Commercial and Religious Conditions of Those Islands from Their Earliest Relations with European Nations to the Close of the Nineteenth Century

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Table of Contents
  • The Philippine Islands, 1493–1898
    • Explorations by early navigators, descriptions of the islands and their peoples, their history and records of the catholic missions, as related in contemporaneous books and manuscripts, showing the political, economic, commercial and religious conditions of those islands from their earliest relations with European nations to the close of the nineteenth century,
  • Volume XXVII, 1636–37
    • Edited and annotated by Emma Helen Blair and James Alexander Robertson with historical introduction and additional notes by Edward Gaylord Bourne.
    • Contents of Volume XXVII
    • Illustrations
    • Preface
    • Documents of 1636
    • Letter from Corcuera to Felipe IV
    • Letter from Felipe IV to Corcuera
    • Royal Decrees
    • Memorial Informatorio Al Rey
    • Grau y Monfalcon’s Informatory Memorial of 1637
      • Number 1. Intention of this memorial, in which are discussed all the principal matters of the Filipinas Islands.
      • Number 2. Condition of the commerce of the islands, and dangers from any changes therein
      • Number 3. Commissions given to Licentiate Quiroga, and their execution
      • Number 4. Uneasiness caused in Nueva España, and what can be feared in the islands
      • [V. Purpose to which this memorial is directed.—Ex. his.]
      • [VI. Proposition to abandon the islands, and its foundations.—Ex. his.]
      • Number 7. More attention should be paid to the conservation of states than to the increase of the royal revenues.
      • Number 8. As, and for the reasons that, Flandes is preserved, the islands should be preserved
      • Number 9. Resolution of preserving the islands well founded
      • Number 10. The conservation of the islands is more necessary today
      • Number 11. First reason of the importance of the islands: their discovery
      • Number 12. Second reason for the importance of the islands: their size and number
      • Number 13. Grandeur and characteristics of the distinguished and very loyal city of Manila
      • Number 14. Third reason of the importance of the islands: their native and acquired character
      • Number 15. Commerce of the islands, domestic and foreign; and in what the domestic consists
      • Number 16. Number and diversity of Indians in the islands
      • Number 17. Indians tributary to the royal crown in the Indias
      • Number 18. Fourth reason for the importance of the islands: their location, as18 is explained
      • Number 19. Importance of the islands because they offer opposition to the Dutch
      • Number 20. The foreign and general commerce of the islands makes them more valuable
      • Number 21. Estimation of the commerce of the Orient, and its condition
      • Number 22. Oriental commerce; why it is valued
      • Number 23. Beginnings of the Oriental commerce by way of Persia
      • Number 24. Commerce of the Orient through the Arabian Gulf and other parts
      • Number 25. Commerce of India confined to Portugal
      • Number 26. Entrance of the Dutch into India, and their commerce
      • Number 27. Commerce of the Orient, which the Dutch carry on from Ba[n]tan
      • Number 28. Commerce in cloves, and how the Dutch entered it, and took possession of Maluco
      • Number 29. Recovery of Maluco by the governor of Filipinas, and its annexation thereto
      • Number 30. The clove trade, which is carried on by way of India
      • Number 31. The Dutch return to Maluco; and the deeds of the governor of Filipinas
      • Number 32. Dutch forts and presidios in the Filipinas district
      • Number 33. Arguments based on the forts of the Dutch
      • Number 34. First argument: for the condition and danger of the commerce
      • Number 35. Second argument: participation in the clove trade of Maluco
      • Number 36. Third argument: the profits of that commerce, and the effect [on it] of the Filipinas
      • Number 37. [Fourth argument:] Commerce of China sustains the Filipinas, and how it is carried on.
      • Number 38. Fifth argument for the importance of the islands: their superiority in those seas
      • Number 39. Sixth argument for the importance of the islands: the effects of their preservation
      • Number 40. First effect of the conservation of the islands: the promulgation of the faith
      • Number 41. Second effect of the conservation of the islands: the security of India
      • Number 42. Third effect of the conservation of the islands: to deprive Olanda of commerce
      • Number 43. Fourth effect of the conservation of the islands: the relief of the Indias
      • Number 44. Fifth effect of the conservation of the islands: the reputation of this crown
      • Number 45. Means existing for the conservation of the islands
      • Number 46. Points to which the execution of the means proposed can be reduced
      • Number 47. First point: of the expenses of the islands; and the first division of it, the administration of justice.
      • Number 48. Second division: the conversion, preaching, divine worship, and the hospitals
      • Number 49. Third division: the presents sent by the governor
      • Number 50. Fourth division: the management of the royal treasury
      • Number 51. Fifth division: land warfare
      • Number 52. Sixth division: of the defense of Maluco
      • Number 53. Seventh division: the navy and marine works
      • Number 54. Eighth division: the food, munitions,44 and other expenses
      • Number 55. Summary of the expenses of the islands, and the persons employed
      • Number 56. Second point: of that which the Filipinas produce
      • Number 57. The excess of expenditures for the islands over the receipts
      • Number 58. The islands contribute more than they spend
      • Number 59. How and in what the inhabitants aid in the support of the islands
      • Number 60. To what degree the inhabitants of the islands ought to be favored
      • Number 61. It is not advisable that the magistracies of the islands be sold
      • Number 62. Third point: of the commerce of the islands with Nueva España
      • Number 63. Why the islands need the commerce of Nueva España
      • Number 64. Commerce of the islands: why it is injurious to España
      • Number 65. Reply to the damages of the commerce of Filipinas; and to the first, regarding the withdrawal of the silver.
      • Number 66. Reply to the statement touching the merchandise exported from the islands
      • Number 67. Commerce of España with the Indias: why it is decreasing
      • Number 68. First reason for the decline of the commerce of the Indias
      • Number 69. Second cause for the decline of the commerce of the Indias
      • Number 70. Third cause for the decline of the commerce of the Indias
      • Number 71. Fourth cause for the decline of the commerce of the Indias
      • Number 72. The Filipinas do not damage the commerce of España
      • Number 73. Beginning of the commerce of the islands
      • Number 74. Permission for the commerce of the Indias, and its final form
      • Number 75. Administration of the permission for the islands for its citizens alone
      • Number 76. Declaration of what is or is not included in the five hundred thousand pesos allowed.
      • Number 77. Smuggled Chinese goods shall not be sold in Perú
      • Number 78. Permission to trade between Perú and Nueva España, and its condition
      • Number 79. Fourth, point: of the condition of the commerce between the islands and Nueva España
      • Number 80. Allegations of transgressions of the permissions given for the islands and Perú
      • Number 81. The violations of law in all commerce, and why they are not remedied
      • Number 82. Tacit permission for what is secreted in the commerce
      • Number 83. The illegalities in the two commerces of the islands and Perú cannot be such as are alleged, in the withdrawal of silver.
      • Number 84. The concealment of silver in the galleons argues for the two permissions
      • Number 85. Excess in the merchandise, over the amount permitted to the islands, cannot be what is stated.
      • Number 86. Permission for the merchandise of the islands: how it is understood there
      • Number 87. Imposition of the two per cent, and the reason why it should be repealed
      • Number 88. Scanty profits of the commerce of the islands
      • Number 89. The new resolution incompatible with that for the two per cent
      • Number 90. Argument for the two per cent that was proposed in Nueva España
      • Number 91. The commerce of the islands pays more duties than any other
      • Number 92. The profits [navigations—MS.] of the citizens of Manila do not equal their losses
      • Number 93. Misfortunes, losses, and damages that have been suffered by the city of Manila and its inhabitants.
      • Number 94. Fifth point: in which is explained the commerce of the islands, according to its parts
      • Number 95. Trade of the islands necessary in Nueva España, because of their goods
      • Number 96. Distinctions in products from the islands, and their qualities with respect to those of España.
      • Number 97. Damage caused to the [sale of] Spanish silks by those of China
      • [XCVIII.—Ex. his.] The damage caused by the silver that is sent to the islands is not at the charge of their inhabitants.
      • Number 99. Intention of the inhabitants of the islands in regard to the excesses of the commerce
      • Number 100. Summary of what is alleged in this memorial
    • Documents of 1637
    • Defeat of Moro Pirates
    • Auditorship of Accounts in Manila, 1595–1637
      • [Point 1]
      • Point 2
      • Point 3
      • [Point 4]
    • The Conquest of Mindanao
    • Events in Filipinas, 1636–37
    • Corcuera’s Triumphant Entry into Manila
    • Royal Aid Requested by the Jesuits at Manila
    • Letters from Corcuera to Felipe IV
    • Bibliographical Data
    • Table of Contents
    • Colophon
      • Availability
      • Encoding Revision History
      • External References
      • Corrections
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