The Wonders of Pompeii
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The Wonders of Pompeii
By Marc Monnier
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Table of Contents
  • THE WONDERS OF POMPEII.
  • BY
  • MARC MONNIER.
    • TRANSLATED FROM THE ORIGINAL FRENCH.
    • Illustrated Library of Wonders.
      • PUBLISHED BY
    • PUBLISHED BY
  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
  • CONTENTS.
  • DIALOGUE.
    • (IN A BOOKSTORE AT NAPLES.)
  • THE
  • WONDERS OF POMPEII.
  • I.
    • THE EXHUMED CITY.
      • The Antique Landscape—The History of Pompeii Before and After its Destruction.—How it was Buried and Exhumed.—Winkelmann as a Prophet.—The Excavations in the Reign of Charles III., of Murat, and of Ferdinand.—The Excavations as they now are.—Signor Fiorelli.—Appearance of the Ruins.—What is and What is not Found There.
    • The Antique Landscape—The History of Pompeii Before and After its Destruction.—How it was Buried and Exhumed.—Winkelmann as a Prophet.—The Excavations in the Reign of Charles III., of Murat, and of Ferdinand.—The Excavations as they now are.—Signor Fiorelli.—Appearance of the Ruins.—What is and What is not Found There.
  • II.
    • THE FORUM.
      • Diomed's Inn.—The Niche of Minerva.—The Appearance and The Monuments of the Forum.—The Antique Temple.—The Pagan ex-Voto Offerings.—The Merchants' City Exchange and the Petty Exchange.—The Pantheon, or was it a Temple, a Slaughter-house, or a Tavern?—The Style of Cooking and the Form of Religion.—The Temple of Venus.—- The Basilica.—The Inscriptions of Passers-by upon the Walls.—The Forum Rebuilt.
    • Diomed's Inn.—The Niche of Minerva.—The Appearance and The Monuments of the Forum.—The Antique Temple.—The Pagan ex-Voto Offerings.—The Merchants' City Exchange and the Petty Exchange.—The Pantheon, or was it a Temple, a Slaughter-house, or a Tavern?—The Style of Cooking and the Form of Religion.—The Temple of Venus.—- The Basilica.—The Inscriptions of Passers-by upon the Walls.—The Forum Rebuilt.
  • III.
    • THE STREET.
      • The Plan of Pompeii.—The Princely Names of the Houses.—Appearance of the Streets, Pavements, Sidewalks, etc.—The Shops and the Signs.—The Perfumer, the Surgeon, etc.—An ancient Manufactory.—Bathing Establishments.—Wine-shops, Disreputable Resorts.—Hanging Balconies, Fountains.—Public Placards: Let us Nominate Battur! Commit no Nuisance!—Religion on the Street.
    • The Plan of Pompeii.—The Princely Names of the Houses.—Appearance of the Streets, Pavements, Sidewalks, etc.—The Shops and the Signs.—The Perfumer, the Surgeon, etc.—An ancient Manufactory.—Bathing Establishments.—Wine-shops, Disreputable Resorts.—Hanging Balconies, Fountains.—Public Placards: Let us Nominate Battur! Commit no Nuisance!—Religion on the Street.
  • IV.
    • THE SUBURBS.
      • The Custom House.—The Fortifications and the Gates.—The Roman Highways.—The Cemetery of Pompeii.—Funerals: the Procession, the Funeral Pyre, the Day of the Dead.—The Tombs and their Inscriptions.—Perpetual Leases.—Burial of the Rich, of Animals, and of the Poor.—The Villas of Diomed and Cicero.
    • The Custom House.—The Fortifications and the Gates.—The Roman Highways.—The Cemetery of Pompeii.—Funerals: the Procession, the Funeral Pyre, the Day of the Dead.—The Tombs and their Inscriptions.—Perpetual Leases.—Burial of the Rich, of Animals, and of the Poor.—The Villas of Diomed and Cicero.
  • V.
    • THE THERMÆ.
      • The Hot Baths at Rome.—The Thermæ of Stabiæ.—A Tilt at Sun Dials.—A Complete Bath, as the Ancients Considered It; the Apartments, the Slaves, the Unguents, the Strigillæ.—A Saying of the Emperor Hadrian.—The Baths for Women.—The Reading Room.—The Roman Newspaper.—The Heating Apparatus.
    • The Hot Baths at Rome.—The Thermæ of Stabiæ.—A Tilt at Sun Dials.—A Complete Bath, as the Ancients Considered It; the Apartments, the Slaves, the Unguents, the Strigillæ.—A Saying of the Emperor Hadrian.—The Baths for Women.—The Reading Room.—The Roman Newspaper.—The Heating Apparatus.
  • VI.
    • THE DWELLINGS.
      • Paratus and Pansa.—The Atrium and the Peristyle.—The Dwelling Refurbished and Repeopled.—The Slaves, the Kitchen, and the Table.—The Morning Occupations of a Pompeian.—The Toilet of a Pompeian Lady.—A Citizen Supper: the Courses, the Guests.—The Homes of the Poor, and the Palaces of Rome.
    • Paratus and Pansa.—The Atrium and the Peristyle.—The Dwelling Refurbished and Repeopled.—The Slaves, the Kitchen, and the Table.—The Morning Occupations of a Pompeian.—The Toilet of a Pompeian Lady.—A Citizen Supper: the Courses, the Guests.—The Homes of the Poor, and the Palaces of Rome.
  • VII.
    • ART IN POMPEII.
      • The Homes of the Wealthy.—The Triangular Forum and the Temples.—Pompeian Architecture: Its Merits and its Defects.—The Artists of the Little City.—The Paintings Here.—Landscapes, Figures, Rope-dancers, Dancing-girls, Centaurs, Gods, Heroes, the Iliad Illustrated.—Mosaics.—Statues and Statuettes.—Jewelry.—Carved Glass.—Art and Life.
    • The Homes of the Wealthy.—The Triangular Forum and the Temples.—Pompeian Architecture: Its Merits and its Defects.—The Artists of the Little City.—The Paintings Here.—Landscapes, Figures, Rope-dancers, Dancing-girls, Centaurs, Gods, Heroes, the Iliad Illustrated.—Mosaics.—Statues and Statuettes.—Jewelry.—Carved Glass.—Art and Life.
  • VIII.
    • THE THEATRES.
      • The Arrangement of the Places of Amusement.—Entrance Tickets.—The Velarium, the Orchestra, the Stage.—The Odeon.—The Holconii.—The Side Scenes, the Masks.—The Atellan Farces.—The Mimes.—Jugglers, etc.—A Remark of Cicero on the Melodramas.—The Barrack of the Gladiators.—Scratched Inscriptions, Instruments of Torture.—The Pompeian Gladiators.—The Amphitheatre: Hunts, Combats, Butcheries, etc.
    • The Arrangement of the Places of Amusement.—Entrance Tickets.—The Velarium, the Orchestra, the Stage.—The Odeon.—The Holconii.—The Side Scenes, the Masks.—The Atellan Farces.—The Mimes.—Jugglers, etc.—A Remark of Cicero on the Melodramas.—The Barrack of the Gladiators.—Scratched Inscriptions, Instruments of Torture.—The Pompeian Gladiators.—The Amphitheatre: Hunts, Combats, Butcheries, etc.
  • IX.
    • THE ERUPTION.
      • The Deluge of Ashes.—The Deluge of Fire.—The Flight of the Pompeians.—The Preoccupations of the Pompeian Women.—The Victims: the Family of Diomed; the Sentinel; the Woman Walled up in a Tomb; the Priest of Isis; the Lovers clinging together, etc.—The Skeletons.—The Dead Bodies moulded by Vesuvius.
    • The Deluge of Ashes.—The Deluge of Fire.—The Flight of the Pompeians.—The Preoccupations of the Pompeian Women.—The Victims: the Family of Diomed; the Sentinel; the Woman Walled up in a Tomb; the Priest of Isis; the Lovers clinging together, etc.—The Skeletons.—The Dead Bodies moulded by Vesuvius.
  • ITINERARY.
  • AN ITINERARY.
  • Charles Scribner & Co.
    • HAVE JUST COMMENCED THE PUBLICATION OF
    • The Illustrated Library of Wonders.
    • FOOTNOTES:
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