The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888
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The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888

By Ernest Favenc
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Book Description

Table of Contents
  • PREFACE.
    • CONTENTS
      • INTRODUCTION
        • PART I LAND EXPLORATION
        • Chapter I [1788-1803]
        • Chapter X [to 1863]
        • PART II MARITIME EXPLORATION
        • Chapter XVII The French Expedition—Buonaparte's lavish outfitting—Baudin in the Géographe—Coast casualties—Sterile and barren appearance—Privations of the crew—Sails for Timor—Hamelin in the Naturaliste—Explores North-Western coast—Swan River—Isle of Rottnest—Joins her consort at Coepang—Sails for Van Dieman's Land—Examination of the South-East coast of Australia—Flinders' prior visit ignored—French names substituted—Discontent among crew—Baudin's unpopularity—Bad food—Port Jackson—Captain King's Voyages—Adventures in the Mermaid—An extensive commission—Allan Cunningham, botanist—Search at Seal Islands for memorial of Flinders' visit—Seed sowing—Jeopardy to voyage—Giant anthills—An aboriginal Stoic—Cape Arnhem and west coast exploration—Macquarie Strait—Audacity of natives—Botanical results satisfactory—Malay Fleet—Raffles Bay—Port Essington—Attack by natives—Cape Van Dieman—Malay Teachings—Timor and its Rajah—Return to Port—Second Voyage—Mermaid and Lady Nelson—East Coast—Cleveland Bay—Cocoa-nuts and pumice stones—Endeavour River—Thieving natives—Geological formation of adjacent country—Remarkable coincidences—Across Gulf of Carpentaria—Inland excursion—Cambridge Gulf—Ophthalmia amongst crew—Mermaid returns to port.
      • PART I LAND EXPLORATION
      • Chapter I [1788-1803]
      • Chapter X [to 1863]
      • PART II MARITIME EXPLORATION
      • Chapter XVII The French Expedition—Buonaparte's lavish outfitting—Baudin in the Géographe—Coast casualties—Sterile and barren appearance—Privations of the crew—Sails for Timor—Hamelin in the Naturaliste—Explores North-Western coast—Swan River—Isle of Rottnest—Joins her consort at Coepang—Sails for Van Dieman's Land—Examination of the South-East coast of Australia—Flinders' prior visit ignored—French names substituted—Discontent among crew—Baudin's unpopularity—Bad food—Port Jackson—Captain King's Voyages—Adventures in the Mermaid—An extensive commission—Allan Cunningham, botanist—Search at Seal Islands for memorial of Flinders' visit—Seed sowing—Jeopardy to voyage—Giant anthills—An aboriginal Stoic—Cape Arnhem and west coast exploration—Macquarie Strait—Audacity of natives—Botanical results satisfactory—Malay Fleet—Raffles Bay—Port Essington—Attack by natives—Cape Van Dieman—Malay Teachings—Timor and its Rajah—Return to Port—Second Voyage—Mermaid and Lady Nelson—East Coast—Cleveland Bay—Cocoa-nuts and pumice stones—Endeavour River—Thieving natives—Geological formation of adjacent country—Remarkable coincidences—Across Gulf of Carpentaria—Inland excursion—Cambridge Gulf—Ophthalmia amongst crew—Mermaid returns to port.
    • INTRODUCTION
      • PART I LAND EXPLORATION
      • Chapter I [1788-1803]
      • Chapter X [to 1863]
      • PART II MARITIME EXPLORATION
      • Chapter XVII The French Expedition—Buonaparte's lavish outfitting—Baudin in the Géographe—Coast casualties—Sterile and barren appearance—Privations of the crew—Sails for Timor—Hamelin in the Naturaliste—Explores North-Western coast—Swan River—Isle of Rottnest—Joins her consort at Coepang—Sails for Van Dieman's Land—Examination of the South-East coast of Australia—Flinders' prior visit ignored—French names substituted—Discontent among crew—Baudin's unpopularity—Bad food—Port Jackson—Captain King's Voyages—Adventures in the Mermaid—An extensive commission—Allan Cunningham, botanist—Search at Seal Islands for memorial of Flinders' visit—Seed sowing—Jeopardy to voyage—Giant anthills—An aboriginal Stoic—Cape Arnhem and west coast exploration—Macquarie Strait—Audacity of natives—Botanical results satisfactory—Malay Fleet—Raffles Bay—Port Essington—Attack by natives—Cape Van Dieman—Malay Teachings—Timor and its Rajah—Return to Port—Second Voyage—Mermaid and Lady Nelson—East Coast—Cleveland Bay—Cocoa-nuts and pumice stones—Endeavour River—Thieving natives—Geological formation of adjacent country—Remarkable coincidences—Across Gulf of Carpentaria—Inland excursion—Cambridge Gulf—Ophthalmia amongst crew—Mermaid returns to port.
    • PART I LAND EXPLORATION
    • Chapter I [1788-1803]
    • Chapter X [to 1863]
    • PART II MARITIME EXPLORATION
    • Chapter XVII The French Expedition—Buonaparte's lavish outfitting—Baudin in the Géographe—Coast casualties—Sterile and barren appearance—Privations of the crew—Sails for Timor—Hamelin in the Naturaliste—Explores North-Western coast—Swan River—Isle of Rottnest—Joins her consort at Coepang—Sails for Van Dieman's Land—Examination of the South-East coast of Australia—Flinders' prior visit ignored—French names substituted—Discontent among crew—Baudin's unpopularity—Bad food—Port Jackson—Captain King's Voyages—Adventures in the Mermaid—An extensive commission—Allan Cunningham, botanist—Search at Seal Islands for memorial of Flinders' visit—Seed sowing—Jeopardy to voyage—Giant anthills—An aboriginal Stoic—Cape Arnhem and west coast exploration—Macquarie Strait—Audacity of natives—Botanical results satisfactory—Malay Fleet—Raffles Bay—Port Essington—Attack by natives—Cape Van Dieman—Malay Teachings—Timor and its Rajah—Return to Port—Second Voyage—Mermaid and Lady Nelson—East Coast—Cleveland Bay—Cocoa-nuts and pumice stones—Endeavour River—Thieving natives—Geological formation of adjacent country—Remarkable coincidences—Across Gulf of Carpentaria—Inland excursion—Cambridge Gulf—Ophthalmia amongst crew—Mermaid returns to port.
  • APPENDIX
  • INTRODUCTION
    • Part I
      • PART II.
    • PART II.
  • PART I.
    • CHAPTER I.
    • CHAPTER II.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • "OUR ROUTE WAS OVER AS MELANCHOLY A TRACT AS EVER WAS TRAVELLED. THE PLAINS TO THE N. AND N.W. BOUNDED THE HORIZON; NOT A TREE OF ANY KIND WAS VISIBLE UPON THEM. IT WAS EQUALLY OPEN TO THE SOUTH, AND IT APPEARED AS IF THE RIVER WAS DECOYING US INTO A DESERT, THERE TO LEAVE US IN DIFFICULTY AND IN DISTRESS."
    • "OUR ROUTE WAS OVER AS MELANCHOLY A TRACT AS EVER WAS TRAVELLED. THE PLAINS TO THE N. AND N.W. BOUNDED THE HORIZON; NOT A TREE OF ANY KIND WAS VISIBLE UPON THEM. IT WAS EQUALLY OPEN TO THE SOUTH, AND IT APPEARED AS IF THE RIVER WAS DECOYING US INTO A DESERT, THERE TO LEAVE US IN DIFFICULTY AND IN DISTRESS."
    • CHAPTER IV.
    • CHAPTER V.
    • CHAPTER VI.
    • CHAPTER VII.
    • CHAPTER VIII.
    • CHAPTER IX.
    • CHAPTER X.
    • CHAPTER XI.
    • CHAPTER XII.
    • CHAPTER XIII.
    • CHAPTER XIV.
  • PART II.
  • MARITIME DISCOVERIES.
    • CHAPTER XV
  • CHAPTER XVI.
    • "AS I WAS ABOUT TO QUIT THE EASTERN COAST OF NEW HOLLAND, WHICH I HAD COASTED FROM LATITUDE 38 DEG. TO THIS PLACE, AND WHICH I AM CONFIDENT NO EUROPEAN HAD EVER SEEN BEFORE, I ONCE MORE HOISTED ENGLISH COLOURS, AND THOUGH I HAD ALREADY TAKEN POSSESSION OF SEVERAL PARTICULAR PARTS, I NOW TOOK POSSESSION OF THE WHOLE EASTERN COAST, FROM LATITUDE 38 DEG. TO THIS PLACE, LATITUDE 10 DEG. 30 MIN., IN RIGHT OF HIS MAJESTY KING GEORGE THE THIRD, BY THE NAME OF NEW SOUTH WALES, WITH ALL THE BAYS, HARBOURS, RIVERS, AND ISLANDS SITUATED UPON IT. WE THEN FIRED THREE VOLLEYS OF SMALL ARMS, WHICH WERE ANSWERED BY THE SAME NUMBER FROM THE SHIP."
      • "TO THE STRAIT WHICH HAD BEEN THE GREAT OBJECT OF RESEARCH, AND WHOSE DISCOVERY WAS NOW COMPLETED, GOVERNOR HUNTER GAVE, AT MY RECOMMENDATION, THE NAME OF 'BASS'S STRAITS.' THIS WAS NO MORE THAN A JUST TRIBUTE TO MY WORTHY FRIEND AND COMPANION FOR THE EXTREME DANGERS AND FATIGUES HE HAD UNDERGONE IN FIRST ENTERING IT IN THE WHALE BOAT, AND TO THE CORRECT JUDGMENT HE HAD FORMED, FROM VARIOUS INDICATIONS, OF THE EXISTENCE OF A WIDE OPENING BETWEEN VAN DIEMAN'S LAND AND NEW SOUTH WALES."
        • "IN THE OLD DUTCH CHARTS, CAPE VANDERLIN IS REPRESENTED TO BE A GREAT PROJECTION FROM THE MAINLAND, AND THE OUTER ENDS OF NORTH AND WEST ISLANDS TO BE SMALLER POINTS OF IT. THERE ARE TWO INDENTS OR BIGHTS MARKED BETWEEN THE POINTS WHICH MAY CORRESPOND TO THE OPENING BETWEEN THE ISLANDS, BUT I FIND A DIFFICULTY IN POINTING OUT WHICH ARE TILE FOUR SMALL ISLES LAID DOWN ON THE WEST OF CAPE VANDERLIN; NEITHER DOES THE LINE OF THE COAST, WHICH IS NEARLY W.S.W. IN THE OLD CHART, CORRESPOND WITH THAT OF THE OUTER ENDS OF THE ISLANDS, AND YET THERE IS ENOUGH OF SIMILITUDE IN THE WHOLE TO SHOW THE IDENTITY. WHETHER ANY CHANGES HAVE TAKEN PLACE IN THESE SHORES, AND MADE ISLANDS OF WHAT WERE PARTS OF THE MAINLAND A CENTURY AND A HALF BEFORE—OR WHETHER THE DUTCH DISCOVERER MADE A DISTANT AND CURSORY EXAMINATION, AND BROUGHT CONJECTURE TO AID HIM IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF A CHART, AS WAS TOO MUCH THE PRACTICE OF THAT TIME-IT IS NOT NOW POSSIBLE TO ASCERTAIN, BUT I CONCEIVE THAT THE GREAT ALTERATION PRODUCED IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF THESE PARTS BY OUR SURVEY, GIVES AUTHORITY TO APPLY A NAME WHICH, WITHOUT PREJUDICE TO THE ORIGINAL ONE, SHOULD MARK THE NATION BY WHICH THE SURVEY WAS MADE. I HAVE CALLED THE CLUSTER OF ISLANDS SIR EDWARD PELLEW GROUP."
      • "IN THE OLD DUTCH CHARTS, CAPE VANDERLIN IS REPRESENTED TO BE A GREAT PROJECTION FROM THE MAINLAND, AND THE OUTER ENDS OF NORTH AND WEST ISLANDS TO BE SMALLER POINTS OF IT. THERE ARE TWO INDENTS OR BIGHTS MARKED BETWEEN THE POINTS WHICH MAY CORRESPOND TO THE OPENING BETWEEN THE ISLANDS, BUT I FIND A DIFFICULTY IN POINTING OUT WHICH ARE TILE FOUR SMALL ISLES LAID DOWN ON THE WEST OF CAPE VANDERLIN; NEITHER DOES THE LINE OF THE COAST, WHICH IS NEARLY W.S.W. IN THE OLD CHART, CORRESPOND WITH THAT OF THE OUTER ENDS OF THE ISLANDS, AND YET THERE IS ENOUGH OF SIMILITUDE IN THE WHOLE TO SHOW THE IDENTITY. WHETHER ANY CHANGES HAVE TAKEN PLACE IN THESE SHORES, AND MADE ISLANDS OF WHAT WERE PARTS OF THE MAINLAND A CENTURY AND A HALF BEFORE—OR WHETHER THE DUTCH DISCOVERER MADE A DISTANT AND CURSORY EXAMINATION, AND BROUGHT CONJECTURE TO AID HIM IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF A CHART, AS WAS TOO MUCH THE PRACTICE OF THAT TIME-IT IS NOT NOW POSSIBLE TO ASCERTAIN, BUT I CONCEIVE THAT THE GREAT ALTERATION PRODUCED IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF THESE PARTS BY OUR SURVEY, GIVES AUTHORITY TO APPLY A NAME WHICH, WITHOUT PREJUDICE TO THE ORIGINAL ONE, SHOULD MARK THE NATION BY WHICH THE SURVEY WAS MADE. I HAVE CALLED THE CLUSTER OF ISLANDS SIR EDWARD PELLEW GROUP."
    • "TO THE STRAIT WHICH HAD BEEN THE GREAT OBJECT OF RESEARCH, AND WHOSE DISCOVERY WAS NOW COMPLETED, GOVERNOR HUNTER GAVE, AT MY RECOMMENDATION, THE NAME OF 'BASS'S STRAITS.' THIS WAS NO MORE THAN A JUST TRIBUTE TO MY WORTHY FRIEND AND COMPANION FOR THE EXTREME DANGERS AND FATIGUES HE HAD UNDERGONE IN FIRST ENTERING IT IN THE WHALE BOAT, AND TO THE CORRECT JUDGMENT HE HAD FORMED, FROM VARIOUS INDICATIONS, OF THE EXISTENCE OF A WIDE OPENING BETWEEN VAN DIEMAN'S LAND AND NEW SOUTH WALES."
      • "IN THE OLD DUTCH CHARTS, CAPE VANDERLIN IS REPRESENTED TO BE A GREAT PROJECTION FROM THE MAINLAND, AND THE OUTER ENDS OF NORTH AND WEST ISLANDS TO BE SMALLER POINTS OF IT. THERE ARE TWO INDENTS OR BIGHTS MARKED BETWEEN THE POINTS WHICH MAY CORRESPOND TO THE OPENING BETWEEN THE ISLANDS, BUT I FIND A DIFFICULTY IN POINTING OUT WHICH ARE TILE FOUR SMALL ISLES LAID DOWN ON THE WEST OF CAPE VANDERLIN; NEITHER DOES THE LINE OF THE COAST, WHICH IS NEARLY W.S.W. IN THE OLD CHART, CORRESPOND WITH THAT OF THE OUTER ENDS OF THE ISLANDS, AND YET THERE IS ENOUGH OF SIMILITUDE IN THE WHOLE TO SHOW THE IDENTITY. WHETHER ANY CHANGES HAVE TAKEN PLACE IN THESE SHORES, AND MADE ISLANDS OF WHAT WERE PARTS OF THE MAINLAND A CENTURY AND A HALF BEFORE—OR WHETHER THE DUTCH DISCOVERER MADE A DISTANT AND CURSORY EXAMINATION, AND BROUGHT CONJECTURE TO AID HIM IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF A CHART, AS WAS TOO MUCH THE PRACTICE OF THAT TIME-IT IS NOT NOW POSSIBLE TO ASCERTAIN, BUT I CONCEIVE THAT THE GREAT ALTERATION PRODUCED IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF THESE PARTS BY OUR SURVEY, GIVES AUTHORITY TO APPLY A NAME WHICH, WITHOUT PREJUDICE TO THE ORIGINAL ONE, SHOULD MARK THE NATION BY WHICH THE SURVEY WAS MADE. I HAVE CALLED THE CLUSTER OF ISLANDS SIR EDWARD PELLEW GROUP."
    • "IN THE OLD DUTCH CHARTS, CAPE VANDERLIN IS REPRESENTED TO BE A GREAT PROJECTION FROM THE MAINLAND, AND THE OUTER ENDS OF NORTH AND WEST ISLANDS TO BE SMALLER POINTS OF IT. THERE ARE TWO INDENTS OR BIGHTS MARKED BETWEEN THE POINTS WHICH MAY CORRESPOND TO THE OPENING BETWEEN THE ISLANDS, BUT I FIND A DIFFICULTY IN POINTING OUT WHICH ARE TILE FOUR SMALL ISLES LAID DOWN ON THE WEST OF CAPE VANDERLIN; NEITHER DOES THE LINE OF THE COAST, WHICH IS NEARLY W.S.W. IN THE OLD CHART, CORRESPOND WITH THAT OF THE OUTER ENDS OF THE ISLANDS, AND YET THERE IS ENOUGH OF SIMILITUDE IN THE WHOLE TO SHOW THE IDENTITY. WHETHER ANY CHANGES HAVE TAKEN PLACE IN THESE SHORES, AND MADE ISLANDS OF WHAT WERE PARTS OF THE MAINLAND A CENTURY AND A HALF BEFORE—OR WHETHER THE DUTCH DISCOVERER MADE A DISTANT AND CURSORY EXAMINATION, AND BROUGHT CONJECTURE TO AID HIM IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF A CHART, AS WAS TOO MUCH THE PRACTICE OF THAT TIME-IT IS NOT NOW POSSIBLE TO ASCERTAIN, BUT I CONCEIVE THAT THE GREAT ALTERATION PRODUCED IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF THESE PARTS BY OUR SURVEY, GIVES AUTHORITY TO APPLY A NAME WHICH, WITHOUT PREJUDICE TO THE ORIGINAL ONE, SHOULD MARK THE NATION BY WHICH THE SURVEY WAS MADE. I HAVE CALLED THE CLUSTER OF ISLANDS SIR EDWARD PELLEW GROUP."
    • CHAPTER XVII.
    • CHAPTER XVIII.
    • CHAPTER XIX.
    • CHAPTER XX.
    • APPENDIX.
      • THE PANDORA PASS.
        • DEATH OF SURVEYOR-GENERAL OXLEY.
        • ABSTRACT FROM THE "GOVERNMENT GAZETTE" OF MAY 27TH, 1828.
        • CAVE DRAWINGS.
        • SMITH, A LAD OF EIGHTEEN, FOUND DEAD, MAY 8TH, 1839.
        • EYRE'S LETTERS.
        • EXTRACT OF LETTER FROM MAJOR MITCHELL.
        • EXTRACT OF A LETTER OF MR. WALTER BAGOT.
        • THE LAST LETTER RECEIVED FROM DR. LEICHHARDT.
        • THE NARDOO PLANT.
        • THE FINDING OF JOHN KING.
        • POISON PLANTS.
      • DEATH OF SURVEYOR-GENERAL OXLEY.
      • ABSTRACT FROM THE "GOVERNMENT GAZETTE" OF MAY 27TH, 1828.
      • CAVE DRAWINGS.
      • SMITH, A LAD OF EIGHTEEN, FOUND DEAD, MAY 8TH, 1839.
      • EYRE'S LETTERS.
      • EXTRACT OF LETTER FROM MAJOR MITCHELL.
      • EXTRACT OF A LETTER OF MR. WALTER BAGOT.
      • THE LAST LETTER RECEIVED FROM DR. LEICHHARDT.
      • THE NARDOO PLANT.
      • THE FINDING OF JOHN KING.
      • POISON PLANTS.
    • THE PANDORA PASS.
      • DEATH OF SURVEYOR-GENERAL OXLEY.
      • ABSTRACT FROM THE "GOVERNMENT GAZETTE" OF MAY 27TH, 1828.
      • CAVE DRAWINGS.
      • SMITH, A LAD OF EIGHTEEN, FOUND DEAD, MAY 8TH, 1839.
      • EYRE'S LETTERS.
      • EXTRACT OF LETTER FROM MAJOR MITCHELL.
      • EXTRACT OF A LETTER OF MR. WALTER BAGOT.
      • THE LAST LETTER RECEIVED FROM DR. LEICHHARDT.
      • THE NARDOO PLANT.
      • THE FINDING OF JOHN KING.
      • POISON PLANTS.
    • DEATH OF SURVEYOR-GENERAL OXLEY.
    • ABSTRACT FROM THE "GOVERNMENT GAZETTE" OF MAY 27TH, 1828.
    • CAVE DRAWINGS.
    • SMITH, A LAD OF EIGHTEEN, FOUND DEAD, MAY 8TH, 1839.
    • EYRE'S LETTERS.
    • EXTRACT OF LETTER FROM MAJOR MITCHELL.
    • EXTRACT OF A LETTER OF MR. WALTER BAGOT.
    • THE LAST LETTER RECEIVED FROM DR. LEICHHARDT.
    • THE NARDOO PLANT.
    • THE FINDING OF JOHN KING.
    • POISON PLANTS.
    • INDEX OF NAMES, DATES, AND INCIDENTS
    • CHRONOLOGICAL SUMMARY.
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