Wood-Block Printing A Description of the Craft of Woodcutting and Colour Printing Based on the Japanese Practice
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Wood-Block Printing A Description of the Craft of Woodcutting and Colour Printing Based on the Japanese Practice
By F. Morley (Frank Morley) Fletcher
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Table of Contents
  • The Project Gutenberg eBook, Wood-Block Printing, by F. Morley Fletcher, Illustrated by A. W. Seaby
    • E-text prepared by David Clarke, Janet Blenkinship, and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net/c/)
      • Meadowsweet. Collotype reproduction of a woodblock print by the Author. (Frontispiece.)
        • THE ARTISTIC CRAFTS SERIES OF TECHNICAL HANDBOOKS EDITED BY W. R. LETHABY
      • THE ARTISTIC CRAFTS SERIES OF TECHNICAL HANDBOOKS EDITED BY W. R. LETHABY
    • Meadowsweet. Collotype reproduction of a woodblock print by the Author. (Frontispiece.)
      • THE ARTISTIC CRAFTS SERIES OF TECHNICAL HANDBOOKS EDITED BY W. R. LETHABY
    • THE ARTISTIC CRAFTS SERIES OF TECHNICAL HANDBOOKS EDITED BY W. R. LETHABY
  • WOOD-BLOCK PRINTING
    • A DESCRIPTION OF THE CRAFT OF WOODCUTTING & COLOUR PRINTING BASED ON THE JAPANESE PRACTICE BY F. MORLEY FLETCHER WITH DRAWINGS AND ILLUSTRATIONS BY THE AUTHOR AND A. W. SEABY. ALSO COLLOTYPE REPRODUCTIONS OF VARIOUS EXAMPLES OF PRINTING, AND AN ORIGINAL PRINT DESIGNED AND CUT BY THE AUTHOR PRINTED BY HAND ON JAPANESE TAPER
    • EDITOR'S PREFACE
    • AUTHOR'S NOTE
    • CONTENTS
    • ILLUSTRATIONS
    • COLLOTYPE PLATES
    • APPENDIX
    • ERRATA
    • WOOD-BLOCK PRINTING
      • JAPANESE METHOD
    • JAPANESE METHOD
    • CHAPTER I
      • INTRODUCTORY
        • Introduction and Description of the Origins of Wood-block Printing; its uses for personal artistic expression, for reproduction of decorative designs, and as a fundamental training for students of printed decoration.
        • Plate II.—Key-block of the print shown on the frontispiece. (The portion of wood lying outside the points of the mass of foliage is left standing to support the paper, but is not inked in printing.)
      • Introduction and Description of the Origins of Wood-block Printing; its uses for personal artistic expression, for reproduction of decorative designs, and as a fundamental training for students of printed decoration.
      • Plate II.—Key-block of the print shown on the frontispiece. (The portion of wood lying outside the points of the mass of foliage is left standing to support the paper, but is not inked in printing.)
    • INTRODUCTORY
      • Introduction and Description of the Origins of Wood-block Printing; its uses for personal artistic expression, for reproduction of decorative designs, and as a fundamental training for students of printed decoration.
      • Plate II.—Key-block of the print shown on the frontispiece. (The portion of wood lying outside the points of the mass of foliage is left standing to support the paper, but is not inked in printing.)
    • Introduction and Description of the Origins of Wood-block Printing; its uses for personal artistic expression, for reproduction of decorative designs, and as a fundamental training for students of printed decoration.
    • Plate II.—Key-block of the print shown on the frontispiece. (The portion of wood lying outside the points of the mass of foliage is left standing to support the paper, but is not inked in printing.)
    • CHAPTER II
      • General Description of the Operation of Printing from a Set of Blocks
        • Fig. 1.—Plan of work-table.
        • Plate III. The Baren, or printing pad. (The pad is actually 5 inches in diameter.)
      • Fig. 1.—Plan of work-table.
      • Plate III. The Baren, or printing pad. (The pad is actually 5 inches in diameter.)
    • General Description of the Operation of Printing from a Set of Blocks
      • Fig. 1.—Plan of work-table.
      • Plate III. The Baren, or printing pad. (The pad is actually 5 inches in diameter.)
    • Fig. 1.—Plan of work-table.
    • Plate III. The Baren, or printing pad. (The pad is actually 5 inches in diameter.)
    • CHAPTER III
      • Description of the Materials and Tools required for Block-cutting
        • Fig. 2.—Block mounted with cross ends to prevent warping.
        • 1. THE KNIFE
        • Fig. 3.—Drawing of the knife.
        • 2. CHISELS
        • Fig. 4.—Sizes of chisels.
        • 3. MALLET
        • Fig. 5.—Short chisel in split handle.
        • Fig. 6.—Mallet.
        • Plate IV. Colour block of a print of which the key-block is shown on page 5.
      • Fig. 2.—Block mounted with cross ends to prevent warping.
      • 1. THE KNIFE
      • Fig. 3.—Drawing of the knife.
      • 2. CHISELS
      • Fig. 4.—Sizes of chisels.
      • 3. MALLET
      • Fig. 5.—Short chisel in split handle.
      • Fig. 6.—Mallet.
      • Plate IV. Colour block of a print of which the key-block is shown on page 5.
    • Description of the Materials and Tools required for Block-cutting
      • Fig. 2.—Block mounted with cross ends to prevent warping.
      • 1. THE KNIFE
      • Fig. 3.—Drawing of the knife.
      • 2. CHISELS
      • Fig. 4.—Sizes of chisels.
      • 3. MALLET
      • Fig. 5.—Short chisel in split handle.
      • Fig. 6.—Mallet.
      • Plate IV. Colour block of a print of which the key-block is shown on page 5.
    • Fig. 2.—Block mounted with cross ends to prevent warping.
    • 1. THE KNIFE
    • Fig. 3.—Drawing of the knife.
    • 2. CHISELS
    • Fig. 4.—Sizes of chisels.
    • 3. MALLET
    • Fig. 5.—Short chisel in split handle.
    • Fig. 6.—Mallet.
    • Plate IV. Colour block of a print of which the key-block is shown on page 5.
    • CHAPTER IV
      • Block Cutting and the Planning of Blocks
        • CUTTING
        • Plate V. Impression (nearly actual size) of a portion of a Japanese wood block showing great variety in the character of the lines and spots suggesting form.
        • Fig. 7.—Position of the hands in using the knife.
        • Fig. 8.—Another position of the hands in using the knife.
        • Plate VI. Reproduction of an impression (reduced) of the key-block of a Japanese print showing admirable variety in the means used to suggest form.
        • Fig. 11.—Method of holding gouge.
        • Fig. 12.—Clearing of wood between knife cuts.
        • Fig. 13.—Position of register marks.
        • Fig. 15.—Register marks (section of).
        • Fig. 16.—Section of colour-block. A. Colour mass. B. Depression. C. Surface of Plank.
        • ERRORS OF REGISTER
      • CUTTING
      • Plate V. Impression (nearly actual size) of a portion of a Japanese wood block showing great variety in the character of the lines and spots suggesting form.
      • Fig. 7.—Position of the hands in using the knife.
      • Fig. 8.—Another position of the hands in using the knife.
      • Plate VI. Reproduction of an impression (reduced) of the key-block of a Japanese print showing admirable variety in the means used to suggest form.
      • Fig. 11.—Method of holding gouge.
      • Fig. 12.—Clearing of wood between knife cuts.
      • Fig. 13.—Position of register marks.
      • Fig. 15.—Register marks (section of).
      • Fig. 16.—Section of colour-block. A. Colour mass. B. Depression. C. Surface of Plank.
      • ERRORS OF REGISTER
    • Block Cutting and the Planning of Blocks
      • CUTTING
      • Plate V. Impression (nearly actual size) of a portion of a Japanese wood block showing great variety in the character of the lines and spots suggesting form.
      • Fig. 7.—Position of the hands in using the knife.
      • Fig. 8.—Another position of the hands in using the knife.
      • Plate VI. Reproduction of an impression (reduced) of the key-block of a Japanese print showing admirable variety in the means used to suggest form.
      • Fig. 11.—Method of holding gouge.
      • Fig. 12.—Clearing of wood between knife cuts.
      • Fig. 13.—Position of register marks.
      • Fig. 15.—Register marks (section of).
      • Fig. 16.—Section of colour-block. A. Colour mass. B. Depression. C. Surface of Plank.
      • ERRORS OF REGISTER
    • CUTTING
    • Plate V. Impression (nearly actual size) of a portion of a Japanese wood block showing great variety in the character of the lines and spots suggesting form.
    • Fig. 7.—Position of the hands in using the knife.
    • Fig. 8.—Another position of the hands in using the knife.
    • Plate VI. Reproduction of an impression (reduced) of the key-block of a Japanese print showing admirable variety in the means used to suggest form.
    • Fig. 11.—Method of holding gouge.
    • Fig. 12.—Clearing of wood between knife cuts.
    • Fig. 13.—Position of register marks.
    • Fig. 15.—Register marks (section of).
    • Fig. 16.—Section of colour-block. A. Colour mass. B. Depression. C. Surface of Plank.
    • ERRORS OF REGISTER
    • CHAPTER V
      • Preparation of Paper, Ink, Colour, and Paste for Printing
        • PAPER
        • Plate VII. Impression of a portion of detail from a Japanese woodblock (very nearly actual size).
        • Fig. 17.—Drawing of sizing of paper.
        • INK
        • COLOUR
        • PASTE
      • PAPER
      • Plate VII. Impression of a portion of detail from a Japanese woodblock (very nearly actual size).
      • Fig. 17.—Drawing of sizing of paper.
      • INK
      • COLOUR
      • PASTE
    • Preparation of Paper, Ink, Colour, and Paste for Printing
      • PAPER
      • Plate VII. Impression of a portion of detail from a Japanese woodblock (very nearly actual size).
      • Fig. 17.—Drawing of sizing of paper.
      • INK
      • COLOUR
      • PASTE
    • PAPER
    • Plate VII. Impression of a portion of detail from a Japanese woodblock (very nearly actual size).
    • Fig. 17.—Drawing of sizing of paper.
    • INK
    • COLOUR
    • PASTE
    • CHAPTER VI
      • Detailed Method of Printing
        • THE BAREN OR PRINTING PAD
        • TO RE-COVER A WORN BAREN WITH BAMBOO SHEATH
        • Fig. 19.—Method of re-covering baren.
        • BRUSHES
        • Fig. 20.—Drawing of brushes.
        • PRINTING
        • Fig. 21.—Manner of holding the paper.
        • Fig. 22.—Manner of using the baren.
        • PRINTING FROM COLOUR-BLOCKS
        • PRINTING OF GRADATIONS
        • OFFSETTING
        • DRYING OF PRINTS
      • THE BAREN OR PRINTING PAD
      • TO RE-COVER A WORN BAREN WITH BAMBOO SHEATH
      • Fig. 19.—Method of re-covering baren.
      • BRUSHES
      • Fig. 20.—Drawing of brushes.
      • PRINTING
      • Fig. 21.—Manner of holding the paper.
      • Fig. 22.—Manner of using the baren.
      • PRINTING FROM COLOUR-BLOCKS
      • PRINTING OF GRADATIONS
      • OFFSETTING
      • DRYING OF PRINTS
    • Detailed Method of Printing
      • THE BAREN OR PRINTING PAD
      • TO RE-COVER A WORN BAREN WITH BAMBOO SHEATH
      • Fig. 19.—Method of re-covering baren.
      • BRUSHES
      • Fig. 20.—Drawing of brushes.
      • PRINTING
      • Fig. 21.—Manner of holding the paper.
      • Fig. 22.—Manner of using the baren.
      • PRINTING FROM COLOUR-BLOCKS
      • PRINTING OF GRADATIONS
      • OFFSETTING
      • DRYING OF PRINTS
    • THE BAREN OR PRINTING PAD
    • TO RE-COVER A WORN BAREN WITH BAMBOO SHEATH
    • Fig. 19.—Method of re-covering baren.
    • BRUSHES
    • Fig. 20.—Drawing of brushes.
    • PRINTING
    • Fig. 21.—Manner of holding the paper.
    • Fig. 22.—Manner of using the baren.
    • PRINTING FROM COLOUR-BLOCKS
    • PRINTING OF GRADATIONS
    • OFFSETTING
    • DRYING OF PRINTS
    • CHAPTER VII
      • Principles and Main Considerations in designing Wood-block Prints—Their Application to Modern Colour Printing
    • Principles and Main Considerations in designing Wood-block Prints—Their Application to Modern Colour Printing
    • CHAPTER VIII
      • Co-operative Printing
    • Co-operative Printing
    • APPENDIX
      • Plate VIII.—An original Print designed and cut by the Author, printed by hand on Japanese paper.
        • Plate IX.—First printing. Key block. Black.
        • Plate X.—Second printing. Dull Red. Printed lightly at the top.
        • Plate XI.—Third printing. Deep Blue. Strong at the bottom, paler at the top.
        • Plate XII.—Fifth printing. Bright Orange.
        • (The fourth printing, not shown, is a similar small block, printing a faint tone over the road in the foreground.)
        • Plate XIII.—Sixth printing. Indian Red. Gradation.
        • Plate XIV.—Seventh printing. Green. Printed flat.
        • Plate XV.—Eighth printing. Bluish green. Gradation.
        • Plate XVI.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
        • Plate XVII.—Reproduction of a portion of the print shown on the preceding page, actual size, showing the treatment of the foliage and the expressive drawing of the tree trunk and stems.
        • Plate XVIII.—Reproduction of another portion of the print shown on page 111 (actual size), showing the expressive use of line in the drawing of the distant forms.
        • Plate XIX.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
        • Plate XX.—Reproduction of a portion (actual size) of the print on the preceding page, showing treatment of tree forms and distance.
        • Plate XXI.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
        • Plate XXII.—Reproduction of a portion (actual size) of the print on the preceding page, showing treatment of tree and blossom.
        • Plate XXIII.—The Tiger. Reproduction of a colour print by J. D. Batten.
        • Plate XXIV.—Lapwings. Reproduction of a colour print by A. W. Seaby.
      • Plate IX.—First printing. Key block. Black.
      • Plate X.—Second printing. Dull Red. Printed lightly at the top.
      • Plate XI.—Third printing. Deep Blue. Strong at the bottom, paler at the top.
      • Plate XII.—Fifth printing. Bright Orange.
      • (The fourth printing, not shown, is a similar small block, printing a faint tone over the road in the foreground.)
      • Plate XIII.—Sixth printing. Indian Red. Gradation.
      • Plate XIV.—Seventh printing. Green. Printed flat.
      • Plate XV.—Eighth printing. Bluish green. Gradation.
      • Plate XVI.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
      • Plate XVII.—Reproduction of a portion of the print shown on the preceding page, actual size, showing the treatment of the foliage and the expressive drawing of the tree trunk and stems.
      • Plate XVIII.—Reproduction of another portion of the print shown on page 111 (actual size), showing the expressive use of line in the drawing of the distant forms.
      • Plate XIX.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
      • Plate XX.—Reproduction of a portion (actual size) of the print on the preceding page, showing treatment of tree forms and distance.
      • Plate XXI.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
      • Plate XXII.—Reproduction of a portion (actual size) of the print on the preceding page, showing treatment of tree and blossom.
      • Plate XXIII.—The Tiger. Reproduction of a colour print by J. D. Batten.
      • Plate XXIV.—Lapwings. Reproduction of a colour print by A. W. Seaby.
    • Plate VIII.—An original Print designed and cut by the Author, printed by hand on Japanese paper.
      • Plate IX.—First printing. Key block. Black.
      • Plate X.—Second printing. Dull Red. Printed lightly at the top.
      • Plate XI.—Third printing. Deep Blue. Strong at the bottom, paler at the top.
      • Plate XII.—Fifth printing. Bright Orange.
      • (The fourth printing, not shown, is a similar small block, printing a faint tone over the road in the foreground.)
      • Plate XIII.—Sixth printing. Indian Red. Gradation.
      • Plate XIV.—Seventh printing. Green. Printed flat.
      • Plate XV.—Eighth printing. Bluish green. Gradation.
      • Plate XVI.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
      • Plate XVII.—Reproduction of a portion of the print shown on the preceding page, actual size, showing the treatment of the foliage and the expressive drawing of the tree trunk and stems.
      • Plate XVIII.—Reproduction of another portion of the print shown on page 111 (actual size), showing the expressive use of line in the drawing of the distant forms.
      • Plate XIX.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
      • Plate XX.—Reproduction of a portion (actual size) of the print on the preceding page, showing treatment of tree forms and distance.
      • Plate XXI.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
      • Plate XXII.—Reproduction of a portion (actual size) of the print on the preceding page, showing treatment of tree and blossom.
      • Plate XXIII.—The Tiger. Reproduction of a colour print by J. D. Batten.
      • Plate XXIV.—Lapwings. Reproduction of a colour print by A. W. Seaby.
    • Plate IX.—First printing. Key block. Black.
    • Plate X.—Second printing. Dull Red. Printed lightly at the top.
    • Plate XI.—Third printing. Deep Blue. Strong at the bottom, paler at the top.
    • Plate XII.—Fifth printing. Bright Orange.
    • (The fourth printing, not shown, is a similar small block, printing a faint tone over the road in the foreground.)
    • Plate XIII.—Sixth printing. Indian Red. Gradation.
    • Plate XIV.—Seventh printing. Green. Printed flat.
    • Plate XV.—Eighth printing. Bluish green. Gradation.
    • Plate XVI.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
    • Plate XVII.—Reproduction of a portion of the print shown on the preceding page, actual size, showing the treatment of the foliage and the expressive drawing of the tree trunk and stems.
    • Plate XVIII.—Reproduction of another portion of the print shown on page 111 (actual size), showing the expressive use of line in the drawing of the distant forms.
    • Plate XIX.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
    • Plate XX.—Reproduction of a portion (actual size) of the print on the preceding page, showing treatment of tree forms and distance.
    • Plate XXI.—Reproduction of a colour print by Hiroshigé.
    • Plate XXII.—Reproduction of a portion (actual size) of the print on the preceding page, showing treatment of tree and blossom.
    • Plate XXIII.—The Tiger. Reproduction of a colour print by J. D. Batten.
    • Plate XXIV.—Lapwings. Reproduction of a colour print by A. W. Seaby.
    • BOOKS OF REFERENCE
    • INDEX
    • ARTISTS INTERESTED IN THE :: :: PERMANENCE OF :: :: THEIR WOOD BLOCK PRINTS
      • now use the CAMBRIDGE COLOURS only, because
        • SOLE MAKERS
      • SOLE MAKERS
      • MADDERTON & CO., LTD., Loughton, Essex ENGLAND
        • (ESTABLISHED 1891)
        • TELEGRAMS TELEPHONE
        • "MADDERTON, LOUGHTON," ESSEX 63 LOUGHTON
        • All Tools and Materials for
      • (ESTABLISHED 1891)
      • TELEGRAMS TELEPHONE
      • "MADDERTON, LOUGHTON," ESSEX 63 LOUGHTON
      • All Tools and Materials for
      • JAPANESE WOODBLOCK CUTTING AND PRINTING
        • as described in this book are stocked by
      • as described in this book are stocked by
    • now use the CAMBRIDGE COLOURS only, because
      • SOLE MAKERS
    • SOLE MAKERS
    • MADDERTON & CO., LTD., Loughton, Essex ENGLAND
      • (ESTABLISHED 1891)
      • TELEGRAMS TELEPHONE
      • "MADDERTON, LOUGHTON," ESSEX 63 LOUGHTON
      • All Tools and Materials for
    • (ESTABLISHED 1891)
    • TELEGRAMS TELEPHONE
    • "MADDERTON, LOUGHTON," ESSEX 63 LOUGHTON
    • All Tools and Materials for
    • JAPANESE WOODBLOCK CUTTING AND PRINTING
      • as described in this book are stocked by
    • as described in this book are stocked by
    • PENROSE'S
      • including several new forms of Tools and Brushes approved by F. Morley Fletcher, Esq.
      • LIST FREE ON APPLICATION
        • A. W. PENROSE & CO., LTD. 109 Farringdon Road, London, E.C.1.
      • A. W. PENROSE & CO., LTD. 109 Farringdon Road, London, E.C.1.
    • including several new forms of Tools and Brushes approved by F. Morley Fletcher, Esq.
    • LIST FREE ON APPLICATION
      • A. W. PENROSE & CO., LTD. 109 Farringdon Road, London, E.C.1.
    • A. W. PENROSE & CO., LTD. 109 Farringdon Road, London, E.C.1.
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