Little Visits with Great Americans, Vol. I (of 2) Or Success, Ideals and How to Attain Them
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Little Visits with Great Americans, Vol. I (of 2) Or Success, Ideals and How to Attain Them

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Table of Contents
  • LITTLE VISITS WITH GREAT AMERICANS
  • PREFACE
  • CONTENTS
  • INTRODUCTION
  • BOOK ONE INSPIRATIONAL TALKS WITH FAMOUS AMERICANS.
  • Success Maxims
  • I Hard Work: the Secret of a Great Inventor’s Genius.
    • HIS GRANDFATHER WAS A BANKER.
    • HIS FIRST EXPERIMENTS.
    • A NOVEL METHOD OF TELEGRAPHING.
    • HIS FIRST PATENT.
    • POVERTY AS AN INCENTIVE TO EFFORT.
    • NEVER DID ANYTHING WORTH WHILE BY CHANCE.
    • OPPORTUNITIES FOR FUTURE INVENTORS.
    • THE WIZARD AT HOME.
    • MRS. EDISON IS ALSO AN INVENTOR OF GOOD ABILITY.
    • RISES EARLY AND WORKS LONG.
  • II A “Down-east” Yankee who Dictates Peace to the Nations.
    • THE MAN WHOSE GUNS WILL CLEAR A JUNGLE.
    • HIS BRAIN IS BUILT UP OF INVENTIVE CELLS.
    • BITING OFF THE DOG’S TAIL.
    • PAT’S ANXIETY TO TRY “THE BOSS,” AND ITS RESULT.
    • HOW THE MAINE “BACKWOODSMAN” CAPTURED A ROBBER.
    • FROM GAS MACHINES TO INCANDESCENT LAMPS.
    • THE GENESIS OF THE AUTOMATIC GUN.
    • AUTOMATIC GUNS MADE SMOKELESS POWDER INDISPENSABLE.
    • HOW LI HUNG CHANG BECAME INTERESTED IN MAXIM.
    • HOW A FIRST-CLASS FRAUD WAS EXPOSED.
  • III A Poor Boy Once Borrowed Books Now Gives Away Libraries.
    • IT IS HARDER NOW TO GET A START.
    • MR. CARNEGIE’S FIRST WAGES.
    • HIS FIRST GLIMPSE OF PARADISE.
    • IT IS BEST TO BEGIN AT THE BOTTOM.
    • HE WAS AN EXPERT TELEGRAPH OPERATOR.
    • THE RIGHT MEN IN DEMAND.
    • HOW TO ATTRACT ATTENTION.
    • CARNEGIE AND THE SLEEPING-CAR.
    • THE MARK OF A MILLIONAIRE.
    • A FORTUNATE LAND PURCHASE.
    • THE HOMESTEAD STEEL WORKS.
    • A STRENGTHENING POLICY.
    • MR. CARNEGIE’S PHILANTHROPY.
    • CARNEGIE’S VIEWS ON THRIFT.
    • “THE MISFORTUNE OF BEING RICH MEN’S SONS.”
  • IV A Good Shoemaker Becomes Detroit’s Best Mayor and Michigan’s Greatest Governor.
    • HOW HE BECAME MAYOR OF DETROIT.
    • A GREAT CHANGE PROPHESIED.
    • HE WAS NOT A DEMAGOGUE.
    • GOVERNOR PINGREE’S LUXURIOUS HOME.
  • V Determined not to Remain Poor, a Farmer Boy Becomes a Merchant Prince
    • HIS PARENTS HELPED HIM.
    • ALWAYS INTERESTED IN COMMERCE.
    • HIS PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS.
    • PERSEVERANCE, MR. FIELD’S ESSENTIAL TRAIT.
    • QUALITIES THAT MAKE FOR SUCCESS.
  • VI Honesty, the Foundation of a Great Merchant’s Career
    • A STANCH INHERITANCE.
    • HE WAS ALWAYS PROMPT.
    • STEP BY STEP UPWARD.
    • “WAKING UP” A TOWN.
    • SEIZING OPPORTUNITIES.
    • ECONOMICAL WAYS.
    • CHRISTIAN PHILANTHROPIST.
    • HIS ADVICE TO YOUNG MERCHANTS.
    • CONDITIONS THEN AND NOW.
    • THE VALUE OF “PUSH.”
  • VII A British Boy Wins Fortune and Title by American Business Methods.
    • SIR THOMAS WAS WON.
    • WHEN HE BORROWED FIVE CENTS.
    • AMERICAN BUSINESS METHODS GAVE HIM HIS START.
    • HE OWNS NEARLY FIVE HUNDRED STORES.
    • CHANCES FOR YOUNG MEN TO-DAY.
    • “THRIFT IS THE TRUE SECRET OF SUCCESS.”
  • VIII A Self-made Man who Strives to Give others a Chance
    • AN AGE OF OPPORTUNITIES.
    • THE FIRST HUNDRED DOLLARS.
    • TRAITS OF INFLUENTIAL MEN.
    • SOME SECRETS OF SUCCESS.
    • THE BOTTOM OF THE LADDER.
    • A WORD ABOUT CHEAP HOTELS.
  • IX Thrift, the Secret of a Fortune Built in a Single Lifetime.
    • HE BEGAN AS A GROCERY CLERK.
    • NO LUCK IN HIS ACHIEVEMENT.
    • STRICT HONESTY IS NECESSARY.
  • X Cut Out for a Banker, He Rose from Errand Boy to Secretary of the U. S. Treasury.
    • WHEN YOU START IN LIFE IN A STRANGE CITY, DO NOT EXPECT “SOFT SNAPS.”
    • THE PUBLIC WOULD RATHER INVEST ITS MONEY IN MEN THAN IN FINE BUILDINGS.
  • XI A Young Millionaire not Afraid to Work in Overalls.
    • FROM THE FOUNDATION UP.
    • WISE DEVELOPMENT OF INHERITED TENDENCIES.
    • HE WILL MASTER EVERY DETAIL.
    • WORKING AS A MACHINIST.
  • XII A Messenger Boy’s Zeal Lifts Him to the Head of the World’s Greatest Telegraph System.
    • HE WAS SO POOR HE HAD TO DO HIS OWN COOKING.
    • IT IS WELL TO KNOW WHAT MEN HAVE ACCOMPLISHED.
    • HE TRIED TO DO MORE THAN HE WAS PAID TO DO.
    • THERE ARE AS GOOD CHANCES IN THE WORLD TO-DAY.
  • XIII Enthusiasm for Railroading Makes a Section Hand Head of the Metropolitan System.
    • HE INHERITED A TASTE FOR HARD WORK.
    • HE LOVED HIS WORK.
    • A NICKNAME THAT BECAME A REAL TITLE.
    • AN IMPORTANT MISSION WELL PERFORMED.
    • HOW HE WAS ELECTED TO THE PRESIDENCY OF HIS COMPANY.
    • HIGH-PRICED MEN ARE IN DEMAND.
  • XIV A Factory Boy’s Purpose to Improve Labor Makes Him a Great Leader.
    • LOOKS LIKE EDWIN FORREST.
    • HE WORKED IN A FACTORY AT TEN.
    • THE LATER ARISTOCRACY.
    • THE NEED OF ORGANIZED LABOR.
    • HE WAS ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE FEDERATION.
    • FOR THE EIGHT-HOUR WORKDAY.
    • STRIKES AS A LAST RESORT.
  • XV A Puny Boy, by Physical Culture, Becomes the Most Vigorous of American Presidents.
    • YOUNG MEN IN POLITICS.
    • OPPORTUNITIES AND TALENTS.
    • THE CITIZENSHIP THAT COUNTS.
    • THE BOYHOOD OF ROOSEVELT.
    • WHERE HE GAINED STRENUOSITY.
    • HE DASHED INTO THE VORTEX OF THE CHASE.
    • HE SHOWED PIONEERS HOW TO WINTER CATTLE.
    • HE CIVILIZED MANY “BAD MEN” BY HIS INFLUENCE.
    • “GAMENESS” WAS NEEDED; ROOSEVELT HAD PLENTY.
    • HIS FRONTIER LIFE WAS AMPLY WORTH THE WHILE.
  • XVI A Brave Volunteer Fights His Way to the Head of the American Army.
    • SIX YEARS OF INDIAN FIGHTING.
    • HIS RECORD IN THE CIVIL WAR.
    • A LOYAL, DAUNTLESS LEADER.
    • A YOUNG MAN’S CHANCES IN THE ARMY.
    • CHARACTER THE FOUNDATION OF TRUE COURAGE.
    • COURAGE NATURAL TO AMERICANS.
  • XVII Making the Most of His Opportunities Wins a Coveted Embassy.
    • A YOUNG LAWYER’S CHANCES THEN AND NOW.
    • ARE SPECIAL ADVANTAGES NECESSARY?
    • WHAT SUCCESS MEANS.
    • THE GOOD LUCK OF BEING PREPARED.
    • TURNING OBSTACLES INTO AIDS.
    • DOES LACK OF OPPORTUNITY JUSTIFY.
    • MR. CHOATE’S ANTECEDENTS.
    • DOES SUCCESS BRING CONTENT AND HAPPINESS.
    • THE DELUSION OF LUXURY AND EASE.
    • MR. CHOATE’S SHARE OF NEW YORK’S LAW BUSINESS.
  • XVIII A Village Boy’s Gift of Oratory Earns Him Wealth and Fame.
    • HE HAD TO EARN HIS OWN WAY.
    • HE ENTERED YALE AT EIGHTEEN.
    • HIS BEGINNING AS AN ORATOR.
    • A SALARY OF .5,000 A YEAR.
    • OPPORTUNITIES OF TO-DAY.
    • THERE IS MORE THAN ONE KIND OF SUCCESS.
  • XIX A Chance-Found Book the Turning Point in a United States Senator’s Career.
    • A SCHOOL TEACHER AT EIGHTEEN.
    • THE STRANGE RESULT OF A LECTURE.
    • HIS IDEA OF GENUINE SUCCESS.
  • XX Varied Business Training the Foundation of a Long Political Career.
    • HIS START AS A BOY.
    • ALWAYS FOND OF READING.
    • A TASTE OF MINING LIFE
    • THE ELEMENTS OF SUCCESS.
    • ADVICE TO YOUNG MEN.
    • MR. PLATT’S CHARACTERISTICS.
  • XXI A Magnate, the Courage of His Convictions Make Him a Reformer.
    • HIS FIRST SPECULATION.
    • AT WORK IN A ROLLING MILL.
    • A FORTUNATE MISFORTUNE.
    • “PROGRESS AND POVERTY” CHANGED HIS WHOLE LIFE.
    • HIS VOLUNTEER GERMAN FRIEND.
    • HIS FIRST SPEECH IN CONGRESS.
    • TOM REED LISTENED.
    • A PEN PICTURE OF TOM JOHNSON.
  • XXII A Backwoods Boy Works His Way through College and Becomes University President.
    • HE ALWAYS SUPPORTED HIMSELF.
    • THE TURNING POINT OF HIS LIFE.
    • A SPLENDID COLLEGE RECORD.
    • COLLEGE-BRED MEN ARE IN DEMAND
  • XXIII A “Jack of All Trades” Masters One and Becomes the Poet of the People.
    • THROWN ON HIS OWN RESOURCES.
    • WHY HE LONGED TO BE A BAKER.
    • THE SUPERSTRUCTURE DEPENDS ON THE FOUNDATION.
    • A LITERARY LIFE MEANS WORK.
    • A COLLEGE EDUCATION IS AN ADVANTAGE.
  • XXIV A Farm Boy Who Devoured Books Writes One of the Greatest Poems of the Century.
    • THE MAN WITH THE HOE.
    • ONE OF THE GREAT POEMS OF THE CENTURY.
    • HIS MOTHER WAS BOTH PRACTICAL AND POETIC.
    • HE GAINED VALUABLE DISCIPLINE ON A FARM.
    • BYRON’S POEMS INSPIRED HIM.
    • ANSWERING HIS CRITICS.
    • SEED SOWN LONG AGO.
  • XXV A Famous Authoress Tells Literary Aspirants the Story of Her Struggle for Recognition.
    • HOW HER BEST POEMS WERE WRITTEN.
    • THE CREED.
    • SHE IS A PRONOUNCED OPTIMIST.
    • DO NOT FEAR CRITICISM.
    • MERIT IS NOT ALWAYS DISCOVERED QUICKLY.
    • EDITORS ARE ANXIOUS FOR GOOD ARTICLES.
    • PERSEVERANCE COUNTS IN AUTHORSHIP.
    • WILL-POWER
  • XXVI A Printer’s Boy, Self Taught, Becomes the Dean of American Letters.
    • EARLY IDEALS.
    • ACQUIRING A LITERARY STYLE.
    • HIS POEMS ALWAYS WERE REJECTED.
    • HIS FIRST EDITORIAL POSITION.
    • AN EXPERIENCE IN COLLABORATION.
    • THE REWARDS OF LITERATURE.
    • WHAT TRUE HAPPINESS IS.
  • XXVII A Famous Novelist Atones for Wasted School Days by Self-Culture.
    • HE WAS A CARELESS STUDENT.
    • HE LOVED TO READ.
    • A FATHER’S FRUITFUL WARNING.
    • HIS FIRST LITERARY EFFORT.
    • THE ORIGIN OF “BEN HUR.”
    • CONVERTED WHILE WRITING HIS OWN BOOK.
  • XXVIII A Social Leader, Having “Eyes That See,” Earns Literary Laurels.
    • HER FIRST NOVEL.
    • BOOKS SHE ENJOYED.
    • HER CHARACTERS ARE FROM LIFE.
    • IN LOVE WITH HER WORK.
    • SHE IS A GENTLE, FORCEFUL WOMAN.
  • XXIX Painstaking, the Secret of a Celebrated Painter’s Success.
    • A MOST INTERESTING STUDIO.
    • HE WAS NOT A PRECOCIOUS BOY.
    • HIS WORK WAS ENCOURAGED.
    • HE ALWAYS TAKES PAINS.
    • PERSISTENCE AND HARD WORK COUNT.
  • XXX A School Girl, Not Afraid of Drudgery, Becomes America’s Foremost Woman Illustrator.
    • ART IGNORES NOISE.
    • GIRLS’ CHANCES AS ILLUSTRATORS.
    • HOW SHE BEGAN.
  • XXXI A Schoolboy’s Sketches Reveal the Bent of a Talented Illustrator.
    • REMINGTON’S SCHOOLBOY EFFECTS.
    • REMINGTON’S ATTENTION TO DETAIL.
    • HOW HIS WAR PICTURES ARE MADE.
    • COLOR OF THE PLAINS.
    • HIS FIRST SKETCH.
  • XXXII Rebuffs and Disappointments Fail to Repress a Great Cartoonist’s Genius.
    • DAVENPORT’S UNIQUE STUDIO.
    • HE DREW CARTOONS IN SCHOOL.
    • HIS FIRST DISAPPOINTMENT.
    • AT TEN DOLLARS A WEEK.
    • HE WAS DISCHARGED IN CHICAGO.
    • IN CLOVER AT LAST.
  • XXXIII Being Himself in Style and Subjects, the Secret of an Artist’s Wonderful Popularity.
    • A NATURAL ARTIST WILL NEVER REQUIRE AN INSTRUCTOR.
    • IF YOU DO NOT SEE YOUR MISTAKES, NO ONE ELSE CAN.
    • THE VALUE OF ARTISTIC INDIVIDUALITY.
    • WHILE STUDYING ART, ONE SHOULD WORK INCESSANTLY.
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