The Discoverie of Witchcraft
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The Discoverie of Witchcraft

By Reginald Scot
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Table of Contents
  • THE DISCOVERIE OF WITCHCRAFT
  • PREFACE
  • INTRODUCTION.
    • WILL OF RAYNOLD SCOT.
    • ABSTRACT OF INQUIS. POST MORTEM, 18 ELIZ. p. 1, No. 84.
    • ABSTRACT OF INQUIS. P.M., 45 ELIZ., pars. 1, No. 71.
  • The Epistle
    • To the Honorable, mine especiall good Lord, Sir Roger Manwood Knight, Lord cheefe Baron of hir Majesties Court of the Eschequer.
    • To the right worshipfull Sir Thomas Scot Knight, &c.
    • To the right worshipfull his loving friends, Maister Doctor Coldwell Deane of Rochester, and Maister Doctor Readman Archdeacon of Canturburie, &c.
    • To the Readers.
    • The forren authors used in this Booke.
  • The summe of everie chapter conteined in the sixteene bookes of this discoverie, with the discourse of divels and spirits annexed thereunto.
  • The first Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
  • The second Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The Ninth Chapter.
    • The tenth Chapter.
    • The eleventh Chapter.
    • The twelfe Chapter.
  • The third Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
    • The tenth Chapter.
    • The eleventh Chapter.
    • The twelfe Chapter.
    • The xiii. Chapter.
    • The xiiii. Chapter.
    • The xv. Chapter.
    • The xvi. Chapter.
    • The xvii. Chapter.
    • The xviii. Chapter.
    • The xix. Chapter.
    • The xx. Chapter.
  • The fourth Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fifth Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
    • The tenth Chapter.
    • The eleventh Chapter.
    • The twelfe Chapter.
  • The fift Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
  • The sixt Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
  • The seventh Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
    • The tenth Chapter.
    • The eleventh Chapter.
    • The twelfe Chapter.
    • The xiii. Chapter.
    • The xiiii. Chapter.
    • The xv. Chapter.
    • The xvi. Chapter.
  • The eight Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
  • The ninth Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
  • The tenth Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
    • The tenth Chapter.
  • The eleventh Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
    • The tenth Chapter.
    • The eleventh Chapter.
    • The twelfe Chapter.
    • The xiii. Chapter.
    • The xiiii. Chapter.
    • The xv. Chapter.
    • The xvi. Chapter.
    • The xvii. Chapter.
    • The 18. Chapter.
    • The 19. Chapter.
    • The xx. Chapter.
    • The xxi. Chapter.
    • The xxii Chapter.
    • The xxiii. Chapter.
  • The twelfe Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
      • ¶ A charme against shot, or a wastcote of proofe.
      • ¶ Against the falling evill.
      • ¶ A popish periapt or charme, which must never be said, but carried about one, against theeves.
      • ¶ Another amulet.
      • ¶ A papisticall charme.
      • ¶ A charme found in the canon of the masse.
      • ¶ Other papisticall charmes.
      • ¶ A charme of the holie crosse.
      • ¶ A charme taken out of the Primer.
    • The tenth Chapter.
    • The eleventh Chapter.
    • The twelfe Chapter.
    • The xiii. Chapter.
    • The xiiii. Chapter.
      • For the falling evill.
      • ¶ Against the biting of a mad dog.
      • ¶ Against the biting of a scorpion.
      • ¶ Against the toothach.
      • ¶ A charme to release a woman in travell.
      • ¶ To heale the Kings or Queenes evill, or any other sorenesse in the throte.
      • ¶ A charme read in the Romish church, upon saint Blazes daie, that will fetch a thorne out of anie place of ones bodie, a bone out of the throte, &c: Lect. 3.
      • ¶ A charme for the headach.
      • ¶ A charme to be said each morning by a witch fasting, or at least before she go abroad.
      • ¶ Another charme that witches use at the gathering of their medicinable hearbs.
      • ¶ An old womans charme, wherewith she did much good in the countrie, and grew famous thereby.
      • Another like charme.
      • A charme to open locks.
      • ¶ A charme to drive awaie spirits that haunt anie house.This is called and counted the Paracelsian charme.
      • ¶ A prettie charme or conclusion for one possessed.
      • ¶ Another for the same purpose.
      • ¶ Another to the same effect.
      • ¶ Another charme or witch-craft for the same.179.
      • ¶ A charme for the bots in a horsse.
      • ¶ A charme against vineager.
    • The xv. Chapter.
    • The xvi. Chapter.
      • ¶ A charme teaching how to hurt whom you list with images of wax, &c.
    • The xvii. Chapter.
      • ¶ Counter charmes against these and all other witchcrafts, in the saieng also whereof witches are vexed, &c.
      • ¶ A charme for the choine cough.
      • ¶ For corporall or spirituall rest.
      • ¶ Charmes to find out a theefe.
      • ¶ Another waie to find out a theefe that hath stolne anie thing from you.
      • ¶ To put out the theeves eie.
      • ¶ Another waie to find out a theefe.
      • ¶ A charme to find out or spoile a theefe.
      • ¶Saint Adelberts cursse or charme against theeves.
      • ¶ Another inchantment.
    • The xviii Chapter.
      • ¶ A charme or experiment to find out a witch.
      • To spoile a theefe, a witch, or anie other enimie, and to be delivered from the evill.
      • ¶ A notable charme or medicine to pull out an arrowhead, or anie such thing that sticketh in the flesh or bones, and cannot otherwise be had out.
      • ¶ Charmes against a quotidian ague.
      • ¶ For all maner of agues intermittant.
      • Periapts, characters, &c: for agues, and to cure all diseases, and to deliver from all evill.
      • ¶ More charmes for agues.
      • ¶ For a bloudie flux, or rather an issue of bloud.
      • ¶ Cures commensed and finished by witchcraft.
      • ¶ Another witchcraft or knaverie, practised by the same surgion.
      • ¶ Another experiment for one bewitched.
      • ¶ Otherwise.
      • ¶ A knacke to knowe whether you be bewitched, or no, &c.
    • The xix. Chapter.
    • The xx. Chapter.
    • The xxi. Chapter.
      • ¶ A charme to find hir that bewitched your kine.
      • ¶ Another, for all that have bewitched anie kind of cattell.
      • ¶ A speciall charme to preserve all cattell from witchcraft.
    • The xxii. Chapter.
      • The charme of charmes.
      • ¶ Otherwise.
    • The xxiii. Chapter.
  • The xiii. Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
    • The tenth Chapter.
    • The eleventh Chapter.
    • The twelfe Chapter.
    • The xiii. Chapter.
    • The xiiii. Chapter.
    • The xv. Chapter.
    • The xvi. Chapter.
    • The xvii. Chapter.
    • The xviii. Chapter.
    • The xix. Chapter.
    • The xx. Chapter.
    • The xxi. Chapter.
    • The xxii. Chapter.
    • The xxiii. Chapter.
      • To make a little ball swell in your hand till it be verie great.
      • To consume (or rather to conveie) one or manie balles into nothing.324.
      • How to rap a wag upon the knuckles.
    • The xxiiii. Chapter.
      • To conveie monie out of one of your hands into the other by legierdemaine.325.
      • To convert or transubstantiate monie into counters, or counters into monie.
      • To put one testor into one hand, and an other into the other hand, and with words to bring them togither.
      • 326.To put one testor into a strangers hand, and another into your owne, and to conveie both into the strangers hand with words
      • How to doo the same or the like feate otherwise.
      • To throwe a peece of monie awaie, and to find it againe where you list.
      • With words to make a groat or a testor to leape out of a pot, or to run alongst upon a table.
      • To make a groat or a testor to sinke through a table, and to vanish out of a handkercher verie strangelie.
      • A notable tricke to transforme a counter to a groat.
    • The xxv. Chapter.
      • To conveie a testor out of ones hand that holdeth it fast.232.
      • To throwe a peece of monie into a deepe pond, and to fetch it againe from whence you list.
      • To conveie one shilling being in one hand into another, holding your armes abroad like a rood.
      • How to rap a wag on the knuckles.
    • The xxvi. Chapter.
    • The xxvii. Chapter.
      • How to deliver out foure aces, and to convert them into foure knaves.
      • How to tell one what card he seeth in the bottome, when the same card is shuffled into the stocke.
      • An other waie to doo the same, having your selfe indeed never seene the card.
      • To tell one without confederacie what card he thinketh.
    • The xxviii. Chapter.
    • The xxix. Chapter.
      • A notable feate of fast or loose; namelie, to pull three beadstones from off a cord, while you hold fast the ends thereof, without remooving of your hand.
    • The xxx. Chapter.
      • To make a shoale of goslings drawe a timber log.
      • To make a pot or anie such thing standing fast on the cupboord, to fall downe thense by vertue of words.
      • To make one danse naked.339.
      • To transforme or alter the colour of ones cap or hat.
      • How to tell where a stollen horsse is become.
    • The xxxi. Chapter.
      • 240.How to conveie (with words or charmes) the corne conteined in one box into an other.
      • Of an other boxe to convert wheat into flower with words, &c.
      • Of diverse petie juggling knacks.
    • The xxxii Chapter.
      • To cut a lace asunder in the middest, and to make it whole againe.
      • How to pull laces innumerable out of your mouth, of what colour or length you list, and never anie thing seene to be therein.
    • The xxxiii. Chapter.
    • The xxxiiii. Chapter.
      • To eate a knife, and to fetch it out of anie other place.
      • To thrust a bodkin into your head without hurt.
      • To thrust a bodkin through your toong, and a knife through your arme: a pittifull sight, without hurt or danger.
      • To thrust a peece of lead into one eie, and to drive it about (with a sticke) betweene the skin and flesh of the forehead, untill it be brought to the other eie, and there thrust out.
      • To cut halfe your nose asunder, and to heale it againe presentlie without anie salve.
      • To put a ring through your cheeke.246.
      • To cut off ones head, and to laie it in a platter, &c: which the jugglers call the decollation of John Baptist.
      • To thrust a dagger or bodkin into your guts verie strangelie, and to recover immediatlie.
      • 351.To drawe a cord through your nose, mouth or hand, so sensiblie as is woonderful to see.
      • 248.The conclusion, wherin the reader is referred to certeine patterns of instruments wherewith diverse feats heere specified are to be executed.
      • Heere follow patternes of certeine instru*ments [* Hence Rom.] to be used in the former juggling knacks.
      • To thrust a bodkin into your head, and through your toong, &c.
      • To thrust a knife through your arme, and to cut halfe your nose asunder, &c.
      • To cut off ones head, and to laie it in a platter, which the jugglers call the decollation of John Baptist.
  • The xiiii. Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
  • The xv. Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The vi. Chapter.
      • The disposition of the planets.398. 282.
      • The aspects of the planets.
      • How the daie is divided or distinguished.
      • The division of the daie, and the planetarie regiment.399. 283.
      • The division of the night, and the planetarie regiment.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
    • The tenth Chapter.
      • This is the waie to go invisible by these three sisters of fairies.291.
    • The eleventh Chapter.
      • ¶ Saie first the praiers of the angels everie daie, for the space of seaven daies.
      • ¶ Saie this praier fasting, called *Regina* O queene or governesse of the toong. linguæ.
    • The twelfe Chapter.
      • 414. 295.A figure or type proportionall, shewing what forme must be observed and kept, in making the figure whereby the former secret of inclosing a spirit in christall is to be accomplished, &c.
    • The xiii. Chapter.
      • ¶ The two and twentieth psalme.
      • This psalme also following, being the fiftie one psalme, must be said three times over, &c.
    • The xiiii. Chapter.
      • A licence for the spirit to depart.
      • 420. 302.A type or figure of the circle for the maister and his fellowes to sit in, shewing how and after what fashion it should be made.
    • The xv. Chapter.
      • To the water saie also as followeth.
      • 304.Then take the salt in thy hand, and saie putting it into the water, making in the maner of a crosse.
      • Then sprinkle upon anie thing, and saie as followeth.
    • The xvi. Chapter.
    • The xvii. Chapter.
      • Now the Pater noster, Ave, and Credo must be said, and then the praier immediatlie following.
    • The xviii. Chapter.
    • The xix. Chapter.
      • Then being appeared, saie these words following.
      • A licence to depart.
    • The xx. Chapter.
      • To speake with spirits.
    • The xxi. Chapter.
    • The xxii. Chapter.
    • The xxiii. Chapter.
    • The xxiiii. Chapter.
    • The xxv. Chapter.
    • The xxvi. Chapter.
    • The xxvii. Chapter.
      • ¶ A conjuration written in the masse booke. Fol. 1.445.
      • ¶ Oremus.
    • The xxviii Chapter.
    • The xxix Chapter.
    • The xxx. Chapter.
    • The xxxi. Chapter.
    • The xxxii. Chapter.
    • The xxxiii. Chapter.
    • The xxxiiii. Chapter.
    • The xxxv. Chapter.
    • The xxxvi. Chapter.
    • The xxxvii. Chapter.
    • The xxxviii. Chapter.
    • The xxxix. Chapter.
    • The xl. Chapter.
    • The xli. Chapter.
    • The xlii. Chapter.
      • The copie of a letter sent unto me R. S. by T. E. Maister of art, and practiser both of physicke, and also in times past, of certeine vaine sciences; now condemned to die for the same: wherein he openeth the truth touching these deceits.*[* Lines 1, 3, 5 Rom. 2, 4 Ital.]
  • The xvi. Booke.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
    • The tenth Chapter.
  • A Discourse upon divels and spirits, and first of philosophers opinions, also the maner of their reasoning hereupon; and the same confuted.
    • The first Chapter.
    • The second Chapter.
    • The third Chapter.
    • The fourth Chapter.
    • The fift Chapter.
    • The sixt Chapter.
    • The seventh Chapter.
    • The eight Chapter.
    • The ninth Chapter.
    • The tenth Chapter.
    • The eleventh Chapter.
    • The twelfe Chapter.
    • The xiii. Chapter.
    • The xiiii. Chapter.
    • The xv. Chapter.
    • The xvi. Chapter.
    • The xvii. Chapter.
    • The xviii. Chapter.
    • The xix. Chapter.
    • The xx. Chapter.
    • The xxi. Chapter.
    • The xxii. Chapter.
    • The xxiii. Chapter.
    • The xxiiii. Chapter.
    • The xxv. Chapter.
    • The xxvi. Chapter.
    • The xxvii. Chapter.
    • The xxviii. Chapter.
    • The xxix. Chapter.
    • The xxx. Chapter.
    • The xxxi. Chapter.
    • The xxxii. Chapter.
    • The xxxiii. Chapter.
    • The xxxiiii. Chapter.
  • Appendix I.
    • Chap. I.
      • How to consecrate an imaginary Circle.
    • Chap. II.
    • Chap. III.
    • Chap. IV.
    • Chap. V.
      • An Exorcism for the fire.
      • At the putting on the Garments,
    • Chap. VI.
    • Chap. VII.
    • Chap. VIII.
    • Chap. IX.
  • Appendix II.
    • Chap. I.
    • Chap. II.
    • Chap. III.
    • Chap. IV.
    • Chap. V.
    • Chap. VI.
    • Chap. VII.
  • SHAKESPEARE NOTINGS.
  • MIDDLETON’S “WITCH”.
  • EXTRACTS FROM WIER.
    • I.
    • II. SCOT ON THE NAMES, ETC., OF DEVILS FROM WIER, BUT PROBABLY THROUGH T. R., MENTIONED P. 393.
    • Additions to Part I, p. 558.
  • GENERAL NOTINGS ON SCOT’S TEXT.
  • GLOSSARY.
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