George Du Maurier, the Satirist of the Victorians
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George Du Maurier, the Satirist of the Victorians

By T. Martin Wood
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  • The Project Gutenberg eBook, George Du Maurier, the Satirist of the Victorians, by T. Martin Wood
    • E-text prepared by Jonathan Ingram, Susan Skinner, and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team
  • GEORGE DU MAURIER
    • THE SATIRIST OF THE VICTORIANS
      • A REVIEW OF HIS ART AND PERSONALITY
        • WITH FORTY-ONE ILLUSTRATIONS
        • 1913
        • George du Maurier From a portrait in water-colour by himself. In the possession of the Artist's widow.
      • WITH FORTY-ONE ILLUSTRATIONS
      • 1913
      • George du Maurier From a portrait in water-colour by himself. In the possession of the Artist's widow.
    • A REVIEW OF HIS ART AND PERSONALITY
      • WITH FORTY-ONE ILLUSTRATIONS
      • 1913
      • George du Maurier From a portrait in water-colour by himself. In the possession of the Artist's widow.
    • WITH FORTY-ONE ILLUSTRATIONS
    • 1913
    • George du Maurier From a portrait in water-colour by himself. In the possession of the Artist's widow.
    • PREFACE
    • CONTENTS
    • ILLUSTRATIONS
    • GEORGE DU MAURIER
    • I
      • THE WORLD OF DU MAURIER
        • §1
        • Illustration for "Recollections of an English Gold-Mine" Once a Week, 1861.
        • §2
        • §3
        • §4
        • "The Cilician Pirates" The Cornhill, April 1863.
        • §5
        • §6
        • Illustration for "Wives and Daughters" The Cornhill, 1864.
        • §7
        • Illustration for "Wives and Daughters" The Cornhill, 1865.
        • Sketch for illustration for "Wives and Daughters" 1865.
        • §8
        • § 9
      • §1
      • Illustration for "Recollections of an English Gold-Mine" Once a Week, 1861.
      • §2
      • §3
      • §4
      • "The Cilician Pirates" The Cornhill, April 1863.
      • §5
      • §6
      • Illustration for "Wives and Daughters" The Cornhill, 1864.
      • §7
      • Illustration for "Wives and Daughters" The Cornhill, 1865.
      • Sketch for illustration for "Wives and Daughters" 1865.
      • §8
      • § 9
    • THE WORLD OF DU MAURIER
      • §1
      • Illustration for "Recollections of an English Gold-Mine" Once a Week, 1861.
      • §2
      • §3
      • §4
      • "The Cilician Pirates" The Cornhill, April 1863.
      • §5
      • §6
      • Illustration for "Wives and Daughters" The Cornhill, 1864.
      • §7
      • Illustration for "Wives and Daughters" The Cornhill, 1865.
      • Sketch for illustration for "Wives and Daughters" 1865.
      • §8
      • § 9
    • §1
    • Illustration for "Recollections of an English Gold-Mine" Once a Week, 1861.
    • §2
    • §3
    • §4
    • "The Cilician Pirates" The Cornhill, April 1863.
    • §5
    • §6
    • Illustration for "Wives and Daughters" The Cornhill, 1864.
    • §7
    • Illustration for "Wives and Daughters" The Cornhill, 1865.
    • Sketch for illustration for "Wives and Daughters" 1865.
    • §8
    • § 9
    • II
      • THE ART OF DU MAURIER
        • § 1
        • §2
        • Pencil Studies from the Artist's Sketch Book
        • §3
        • §4
        • Illustration for "A Legend of Camelot"—Part III. Punch, March 17, 1866. A little castle she drew nigh, With seven towers twelve inches high.... O Miserie! A baby castle, all a-flame With many a flower that hath no name, O Miserie! It had a little moat all round: A little drawbridge too she found; O Miserie! On which there stood a stately maid, Like her in radiant locks arrayed.... O Miserie! Save that her locks grew rank and wild, By weaver's shuttle undefiled!... O Miserie! Who held her brush and comb, as if Her faltering hands had waxed stiff, O Miserie! With baulkt endeavour! whence she sung A chant, the burden whereof rung: O Miserie! "These hands have striven in vain To part These locks that won GAUWAINE His heart!"
        • § 5
        • §6
        • § 7
        • Illustration for "The Story of a Feather" 1867.
        • §8
        • § 9
        • Illustration for "The Story of a Feather" 1867.
        • Caution "Don't keep your Beer-Barrel in the same cellar as your Dust-Bin!" Punch, February 23, 1867.
        • §10
      • § 1
      • §2
      • Pencil Studies from the Artist's Sketch Book
      • §3
      • §4
      • Illustration for "A Legend of Camelot"—Part III. Punch, March 17, 1866. A little castle she drew nigh, With seven towers twelve inches high.... O Miserie! A baby castle, all a-flame With many a flower that hath no name, O Miserie! It had a little moat all round: A little drawbridge too she found; O Miserie! On which there stood a stately maid, Like her in radiant locks arrayed.... O Miserie! Save that her locks grew rank and wild, By weaver's shuttle undefiled!... O Miserie! Who held her brush and comb, as if Her faltering hands had waxed stiff, O Miserie! With baulkt endeavour! whence she sung A chant, the burden whereof rung: O Miserie! "These hands have striven in vain To part These locks that won GAUWAINE His heart!"
      • § 5
      • §6
      • § 7
      • Illustration for "The Story of a Feather" 1867.
      • §8
      • § 9
      • Illustration for "The Story of a Feather" 1867.
      • Caution "Don't keep your Beer-Barrel in the same cellar as your Dust-Bin!" Punch, February 23, 1867.
      • §10
    • THE ART OF DU MAURIER
      • § 1
      • §2
      • Pencil Studies from the Artist's Sketch Book
      • §3
      • §4
      • Illustration for "A Legend of Camelot"—Part III. Punch, March 17, 1866. A little castle she drew nigh, With seven towers twelve inches high.... O Miserie! A baby castle, all a-flame With many a flower that hath no name, O Miserie! It had a little moat all round: A little drawbridge too she found; O Miserie! On which there stood a stately maid, Like her in radiant locks arrayed.... O Miserie! Save that her locks grew rank and wild, By weaver's shuttle undefiled!... O Miserie! Who held her brush and comb, as if Her faltering hands had waxed stiff, O Miserie! With baulkt endeavour! whence she sung A chant, the burden whereof rung: O Miserie! "These hands have striven in vain To part These locks that won GAUWAINE His heart!"
      • § 5
      • §6
      • § 7
      • Illustration for "The Story of a Feather" 1867.
      • §8
      • § 9
      • Illustration for "The Story of a Feather" 1867.
      • Caution "Don't keep your Beer-Barrel in the same cellar as your Dust-Bin!" Punch, February 23, 1867.
      • §10
    • § 1
    • §2
    • Pencil Studies from the Artist's Sketch Book
    • §3
    • §4
    • Illustration for "A Legend of Camelot"—Part III. Punch, March 17, 1866. A little castle she drew nigh, With seven towers twelve inches high.... O Miserie! A baby castle, all a-flame With many a flower that hath no name, O Miserie! It had a little moat all round: A little drawbridge too she found; O Miserie! On which there stood a stately maid, Like her in radiant locks arrayed.... O Miserie! Save that her locks grew rank and wild, By weaver's shuttle undefiled!... O Miserie! Who held her brush and comb, as if Her faltering hands had waxed stiff, O Miserie! With baulkt endeavour! whence she sung A chant, the burden whereof rung: O Miserie! "These hands have striven in vain To part These locks that won GAUWAINE His heart!"
    • § 5
    • §6
    • § 7
    • Illustration for "The Story of a Feather" 1867.
    • §8
    • § 9
    • Illustration for "The Story of a Feather" 1867.
    • Caution "Don't keep your Beer-Barrel in the same cellar as your Dust-Bin!" Punch, February 23, 1867.
    • §10
    • III
      • DU MAURIER AS AUTHOR
        • §1
        • § 2
        • Berkeley Square, 5 P.M. Punch, August 24, 1867.
        • §3
        • Illustration for "Esmond"
        • § 4
        • Unpublished drawing from sketch-book
        • §5
        • Illustration for "The Adventures of Harry Richmond" The Cornhill, 1870.
        • § 6
        • § 7
        • Illustration for "The Adventures of Harry Richmond" The Cornhill, 1871.
      • §1
      • § 2
      • Berkeley Square, 5 P.M. Punch, August 24, 1867.
      • §3
      • Illustration for "Esmond"
      • § 4
      • Unpublished drawing from sketch-book
      • §5
      • Illustration for "The Adventures of Harry Richmond" The Cornhill, 1870.
      • § 6
      • § 7
      • Illustration for "The Adventures of Harry Richmond" The Cornhill, 1871.
    • DU MAURIER AS AUTHOR
      • §1
      • § 2
      • Berkeley Square, 5 P.M. Punch, August 24, 1867.
      • §3
      • Illustration for "Esmond"
      • § 4
      • Unpublished drawing from sketch-book
      • §5
      • Illustration for "The Adventures of Harry Richmond" The Cornhill, 1870.
      • § 6
      • § 7
      • Illustration for "The Adventures of Harry Richmond" The Cornhill, 1871.
    • §1
    • § 2
    • Berkeley Square, 5 P.M. Punch, August 24, 1867.
    • §3
    • Illustration for "Esmond"
    • § 4
    • Unpublished drawing from sketch-book
    • §5
    • Illustration for "The Adventures of Harry Richmond" The Cornhill, 1870.
    • § 6
    • § 7
    • Illustration for "The Adventures of Harry Richmond" The Cornhill, 1871.
    • IV
      • LIFE OF THE ARTIST
        • §1
        • Proxy "As you're going to say your Prayers, Maud, please mention I'm so dreadfully tired I can't say mine to-night, but I'll be sure to remember to-morrow!" Punch's Almanack, 1874.
        • § 2
        • Queen Prima-Donna at Home Chorus. "O, Mamma!—Dear Mamma!—Darling Mamma!! Do leave off!!!" (Showing that no one is a prophet in his own country.) Punch, November 7, 1874.
        • § 3
        • § 4
        • Honour Where Honour is Due Sir Gorgius Midas (who has not been made a Peer). "Why, it's enough to make a man turn Radical, 'anged if it ain't, to think of sich services as mine bein' rewarded with no 'igher title than what's bestowed on a heminent Sawbones, or a Hingerneer, or a Littery Man, or even a successful Hartist!" Mrs. Ponsonby de Tomkyns (sympathetically). "It does seem hard! But you've only to bide your time, Sir Gorgius. No man of your stamp need ever despair of a Peerage!" (And Mrs. Ponsonby de Tomkyns is, as usual, quite right.) Punch, May 15, 1880.
        • § 5
        • § 6
        • Canon Ainger Portrait in water-colour by du Maurier. In the possession of the artist's widow.
        • § 7
        • The Mutual Admirationists (Fragments overheard by Grigsby and the Colonel at one of Prigsby's Afternoon Teas.) Young Maudle (to Mrs. Lyon Hunter and her Daughters). "In the supremest Poetry, Shakespeare's for instance, or Postlethwaite's, or Shelley's one always feels that," &c., &c., &c. Young Postlethwaite (to the three Miss Bilderbogies). "The greatest Painters of ALL, such as Velasquez, or Maudle, or even Titian, invariably suggest to one," &c., &c., &c. Punch, May 22, 1880.
        • § 8
        • Manuscript of "Nocturne" "Sun of the Sleepless—Melancholy Star!"—BYRON. Translated into French by George du Maurier. The English Illustrated Magazine, September 13, 1886.
        • § 9
        • George du Maurier From a photograph.
        • § 10
        • Speed the Parting Guest (Things one would rather have left unsaid.) "We've had such a pleasant evening, Mr. Jones! May I beg of you to ask one of your servants to call a Hansom?" "With pleasure, Mrs. Smith!" Punch, March 10, 1883.
      • §1
      • Proxy "As you're going to say your Prayers, Maud, please mention I'm so dreadfully tired I can't say mine to-night, but I'll be sure to remember to-morrow!" Punch's Almanack, 1874.
      • § 2
      • Queen Prima-Donna at Home Chorus. "O, Mamma!—Dear Mamma!—Darling Mamma!! Do leave off!!!" (Showing that no one is a prophet in his own country.) Punch, November 7, 1874.
      • § 3
      • § 4
      • Honour Where Honour is Due Sir Gorgius Midas (who has not been made a Peer). "Why, it's enough to make a man turn Radical, 'anged if it ain't, to think of sich services as mine bein' rewarded with no 'igher title than what's bestowed on a heminent Sawbones, or a Hingerneer, or a Littery Man, or even a successful Hartist!" Mrs. Ponsonby de Tomkyns (sympathetically). "It does seem hard! But you've only to bide your time, Sir Gorgius. No man of your stamp need ever despair of a Peerage!" (And Mrs. Ponsonby de Tomkyns is, as usual, quite right.) Punch, May 15, 1880.
      • § 5
      • § 6
      • Canon Ainger Portrait in water-colour by du Maurier. In the possession of the artist's widow.
      • § 7
      • The Mutual Admirationists (Fragments overheard by Grigsby and the Colonel at one of Prigsby's Afternoon Teas.) Young Maudle (to Mrs. Lyon Hunter and her Daughters). "In the supremest Poetry, Shakespeare's for instance, or Postlethwaite's, or Shelley's one always feels that," &c., &c., &c. Young Postlethwaite (to the three Miss Bilderbogies). "The greatest Painters of ALL, such as Velasquez, or Maudle, or even Titian, invariably suggest to one," &c., &c., &c. Punch, May 22, 1880.
      • § 8
      • Manuscript of "Nocturne" "Sun of the Sleepless—Melancholy Star!"—BYRON. Translated into French by George du Maurier. The English Illustrated Magazine, September 13, 1886.
      • § 9
      • George du Maurier From a photograph.
      • § 10
      • Speed the Parting Guest (Things one would rather have left unsaid.) "We've had such a pleasant evening, Mr. Jones! May I beg of you to ask one of your servants to call a Hansom?" "With pleasure, Mrs. Smith!" Punch, March 10, 1883.
    • LIFE OF THE ARTIST
      • §1
      • Proxy "As you're going to say your Prayers, Maud, please mention I'm so dreadfully tired I can't say mine to-night, but I'll be sure to remember to-morrow!" Punch's Almanack, 1874.
      • § 2
      • Queen Prima-Donna at Home Chorus. "O, Mamma!—Dear Mamma!—Darling Mamma!! Do leave off!!!" (Showing that no one is a prophet in his own country.) Punch, November 7, 1874.
      • § 3
      • § 4
      • Honour Where Honour is Due Sir Gorgius Midas (who has not been made a Peer). "Why, it's enough to make a man turn Radical, 'anged if it ain't, to think of sich services as mine bein' rewarded with no 'igher title than what's bestowed on a heminent Sawbones, or a Hingerneer, or a Littery Man, or even a successful Hartist!" Mrs. Ponsonby de Tomkyns (sympathetically). "It does seem hard! But you've only to bide your time, Sir Gorgius. No man of your stamp need ever despair of a Peerage!" (And Mrs. Ponsonby de Tomkyns is, as usual, quite right.) Punch, May 15, 1880.
      • § 5
      • § 6
      • Canon Ainger Portrait in water-colour by du Maurier. In the possession of the artist's widow.
      • § 7
      • The Mutual Admirationists (Fragments overheard by Grigsby and the Colonel at one of Prigsby's Afternoon Teas.) Young Maudle (to Mrs. Lyon Hunter and her Daughters). "In the supremest Poetry, Shakespeare's for instance, or Postlethwaite's, or Shelley's one always feels that," &c., &c., &c. Young Postlethwaite (to the three Miss Bilderbogies). "The greatest Painters of ALL, such as Velasquez, or Maudle, or even Titian, invariably suggest to one," &c., &c., &c. Punch, May 22, 1880.
      • § 8
      • Manuscript of "Nocturne" "Sun of the Sleepless—Melancholy Star!"—BYRON. Translated into French by George du Maurier. The English Illustrated Magazine, September 13, 1886.
      • § 9
      • George du Maurier From a photograph.
      • § 10
      • Speed the Parting Guest (Things one would rather have left unsaid.) "We've had such a pleasant evening, Mr. Jones! May I beg of you to ask one of your servants to call a Hansom?" "With pleasure, Mrs. Smith!" Punch, March 10, 1883.
    • §1
    • Proxy "As you're going to say your Prayers, Maud, please mention I'm so dreadfully tired I can't say mine to-night, but I'll be sure to remember to-morrow!" Punch's Almanack, 1874.
    • § 2
    • Queen Prima-Donna at Home Chorus. "O, Mamma!—Dear Mamma!—Darling Mamma!! Do leave off!!!" (Showing that no one is a prophet in his own country.) Punch, November 7, 1874.
    • § 3
    • § 4
    • Honour Where Honour is Due Sir Gorgius Midas (who has not been made a Peer). "Why, it's enough to make a man turn Radical, 'anged if it ain't, to think of sich services as mine bein' rewarded with no 'igher title than what's bestowed on a heminent Sawbones, or a Hingerneer, or a Littery Man, or even a successful Hartist!" Mrs. Ponsonby de Tomkyns (sympathetically). "It does seem hard! But you've only to bide your time, Sir Gorgius. No man of your stamp need ever despair of a Peerage!" (And Mrs. Ponsonby de Tomkyns is, as usual, quite right.) Punch, May 15, 1880.
    • § 5
    • § 6
    • Canon Ainger Portrait in water-colour by du Maurier. In the possession of the artist's widow.
    • § 7
    • The Mutual Admirationists (Fragments overheard by Grigsby and the Colonel at one of Prigsby's Afternoon Teas.) Young Maudle (to Mrs. Lyon Hunter and her Daughters). "In the supremest Poetry, Shakespeare's for instance, or Postlethwaite's, or Shelley's one always feels that," &c., &c., &c. Young Postlethwaite (to the three Miss Bilderbogies). "The greatest Painters of ALL, such as Velasquez, or Maudle, or even Titian, invariably suggest to one," &c., &c., &c. Punch, May 22, 1880.
    • § 8
    • Manuscript of "Nocturne" "Sun of the Sleepless—Melancholy Star!"—BYRON. Translated into French by George du Maurier. The English Illustrated Magazine, September 13, 1886.
    • § 9
    • George du Maurier From a photograph.
    • § 10
    • Speed the Parting Guest (Things one would rather have left unsaid.) "We've had such a pleasant evening, Mr. Jones! May I beg of you to ask one of your servants to call a Hansom?" "With pleasure, Mrs. Smith!" Punch, March 10, 1883.
    • V
      • THE ILLUSTRATIONS
        • §1
        • Sketch for Initial Letter in "The Cornhill" October, 1883.
        • §2
        • "Sic Transit Gloria Mundi!" "By the way, Duchess, supposing that we do succeed in getting the House of Lords abolished this Session, won't it be a great blow to the Duke?" "Yes, if he ever hears of it; but I shan't tell him, you know!" Punch, March 22, 1884.
        • § 3
        • Post-Prandial Pessimists SCENE—The smoking-room at the Decadents. First Decadent (M.A., Oxon.). "After all, Smythe, what would Life be without Coffee?" Second Decadent (B.A., Camb.). "True, Jeohnes, True! And yet, after all, what is Life with Coffee?" Punch, October 15, 1892.
        • §4
        • §5
        • §6
        • Things One Would Rather have Expressed Differently Fair Hostess. "Good-night, Major Jones. We're supposed to breakfast at nine; but we're not very punctual people. Indeed, the later you appear to-morrow morning, the better pleased we shall all be!" May 13, 1893.
      • §1
      • Sketch for Initial Letter in "The Cornhill" October, 1883.
      • §2
      • "Sic Transit Gloria Mundi!" "By the way, Duchess, supposing that we do succeed in getting the House of Lords abolished this Session, won't it be a great blow to the Duke?" "Yes, if he ever hears of it; but I shan't tell him, you know!" Punch, March 22, 1884.
      • § 3
      • Post-Prandial Pessimists SCENE—The smoking-room at the Decadents. First Decadent (M.A., Oxon.). "After all, Smythe, what would Life be without Coffee?" Second Decadent (B.A., Camb.). "True, Jeohnes, True! And yet, after all, what is Life with Coffee?" Punch, October 15, 1892.
      • §4
      • §5
      • §6
      • Things One Would Rather have Expressed Differently Fair Hostess. "Good-night, Major Jones. We're supposed to breakfast at nine; but we're not very punctual people. Indeed, the later you appear to-morrow morning, the better pleased we shall all be!" May 13, 1893.
    • THE ILLUSTRATIONS
      • §1
      • Sketch for Initial Letter in "The Cornhill" October, 1883.
      • §2
      • "Sic Transit Gloria Mundi!" "By the way, Duchess, supposing that we do succeed in getting the House of Lords abolished this Session, won't it be a great blow to the Duke?" "Yes, if he ever hears of it; but I shan't tell him, you know!" Punch, March 22, 1884.
      • § 3
      • Post-Prandial Pessimists SCENE—The smoking-room at the Decadents. First Decadent (M.A., Oxon.). "After all, Smythe, what would Life be without Coffee?" Second Decadent (B.A., Camb.). "True, Jeohnes, True! And yet, after all, what is Life with Coffee?" Punch, October 15, 1892.
      • §4
      • §5
      • §6
      • Things One Would Rather have Expressed Differently Fair Hostess. "Good-night, Major Jones. We're supposed to breakfast at nine; but we're not very punctual people. Indeed, the later you appear to-morrow morning, the better pleased we shall all be!" May 13, 1893.
    • §1
    • Sketch for Initial Letter in "The Cornhill" October, 1883.
    • §2
    • "Sic Transit Gloria Mundi!" "By the way, Duchess, supposing that we do succeed in getting the House of Lords abolished this Session, won't it be a great blow to the Duke?" "Yes, if he ever hears of it; but I shan't tell him, you know!" Punch, March 22, 1884.
    • § 3
    • Post-Prandial Pessimists SCENE—The smoking-room at the Decadents. First Decadent (M.A., Oxon.). "After all, Smythe, what would Life be without Coffee?" Second Decadent (B.A., Camb.). "True, Jeohnes, True! And yet, after all, what is Life with Coffee?" Punch, October 15, 1892.
    • §4
    • §5
    • §6
    • Things One Would Rather have Expressed Differently Fair Hostess. "Good-night, Major Jones. We're supposed to breakfast at nine; but we're not very punctual people. Indeed, the later you appear to-morrow morning, the better pleased we shall all be!" May 13, 1893.
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