How to Assess Your Students
$21.24

How to Assess Your Students

By Andrew Chandler-Grevatt
US$ 21.24
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Book Description

How to Assess Your Students provides classroom practitioners with concise, practical guidance on a perenially important issue which remains central to teaching success. Written by a former teacher and expert within teacher education and assessment for learning, it leads readers through the assessment journey - from what it means and its practical implementation, through to making successful use of data to inform students' learning. The book: - Explains the
essentials of assessment, including (a) the strengths and weaknesses of standardised tests, and (b) alternative and supplementary forms of assessment - with a particular emphasis on the role of formative assessment in the development of learning - Provides practical guidance on how to prepare effective
activities, tasks, and tests - Shows how we can learn from assessment data, and use it to provide students with helpful, constructive feedback - Empowers teachers to feel confident in using assessment as a progressive tool, helping them to mak

Table of Contents
  • Front Cover
  • Title Page
  • Acknowledgements
  • Chapter 1 Thinking about classroom assessment
    • 1a) Personal introduction
      • Setup of this book
    • 1b) Approaches to assessment
      • Why do assessment?
      • How do schools approach assessment?
      • Who is assessment for?
    • 1c) Summative and formative assessment
      • Summative assessment bad, formative assessment good?
    • 1d) Teaching, learning and assessing
      • Teaching, learning and assessing as social activities
    • 1e) Influences on classroom assessment
      • Research influences
      • Cultural influences
      • Political influences
      • Social influences
    • 1f) A model for assessment
  • Chapter 2 How to do classroom assessment
    • 2a) It’s not what you do, it’s the way that you do it
    • 2b) Towards a formativeclassroom culture
      • Your own pen portrait
      • Limitations of the survey
    • 2c) Planning meaningful assessment
      • Where planning for assessment fits in
      • Creating a formative classroom culture through planning
      • How to plan for formative assessment: Bloom’s taxonomy
      • Phases towards planning for formative assessment
      • Practice analyser: Planning for classroom assessment
      • Analysing your practice and deciding your next steps
      • Planning teacher-led assessment (practices 1–4)
      • Planning your questioning (practice 4)
      • Planning learner-centred assessment (practices 5–7)
      • Planning opportunities for feedback and improvements (practices 8 and 9)
      • Planning lessons based on meaningful assessment (practice 10)
      • Using test results to inform lesson planning
      • Longer-term planning for assessment
    • 2d) Questioning your questioning
      • Where questioning fits in
      • The culture of teachers and questioning
      • Phases towards more formative questioning
      • Questioning your questioning
      • Developing your questioning
      • Analysing your practice and deciding your next steps
      • Developing shared values in questioning (practices 1–10)
      • Developing teacher-led questioning (practices 1–4)
      • Moving from teacher-led to learner-centred questioning (practices 4–9)
      • Answering learners’ questions (practice 5)
      • Involving all learners in questioning (practice 6)
      • Deciding the next steps in learning from questions (practice 7)
      • Increasing thinking time (practice 8)
      • Moving from teacher-led to student-led questioning (practice 10)
    • 2e) Developing meaningful objectives
      • Creating a formative classroom culture through meaningful objectives
      • The purpose of objectives
      • Objectives and outcomes
      • Formulating learning objectives
      • Where meaningful objectives fit in
      • Phases towards developing meaningful objectives and outcomes
      • Practice analyser: Developing meaningful objectives and outcomes
      • Analysing your practice and deciding your next steps
      • Using titles and questions (practice 1)
      • A list of lesson tasks is shared with learners (practice 2)
      • Learning intentions are shared with learners (practice 3)
      • Learning objectives are shared explicitly with learners (practice 4)
      • Learning objectives are shared explicitly with learners (practice 5)
      • Learning objectives are shared explicitly with learners (practice 6)
      • Learning objectives are used to inform assessment in the lesson (practices 7–9)
      • Learners contribute to designing lesson objectives (practice 10)
    • 2f) Developing meaningful success criteria and rubrics
      • Creating a formative classroom culture through success criteria and rubrics
      • Towards a formative culture when using success criteria or rubrics
      • Where success criteria and rubrics fit in
      • Phases towards meaningful success criteria and rubrics
      • Practice analyser: Developing meaningful success criteria and rubrics
      • Analysing your practice and deciding your next steps
      • No expected outcomes shared with learners (practice 1)
      • Success criteria shared at task level (practice 2)
      • Success criteria shared at learning level (practice 3)
      • Sharing ready-made rubrics with my learners (practice 4)
      • Developing your own rubrics (practice 5)
      • Actively engaging learners with using rubrics (practice 6)
      • Plan lessons using rubrics to assess and improve learning (practices 7 and 8)
      • Learners create their own success criteria (practice 9)
      • Summary of developing meaningful criteria and rubrics
    • 2g) Giving meaningful and effective feedback
      • Creating a formative classroom culture through feedback
      • Where giving feedback fits in
      • Phases towards giving meaningful and effective feedback
      • Practice analyser: Developing meaningful and effective feedback
      • Analysing your practice and deciding your next steps
      • Marking learners’ books with a grade and comments (practices 1 and 2)
      • Specific targets as feedback, verbally or in writing (practice 3)
      • Provide targets and the opportunity to respond in lessons (practice 4)
      • Using success criteria or rubrics to communicate feedback (practices 5 and 6)
      • Using success criteria and rubrics for feedback in self- and peer assessment (practices 7 and 8)
      • Learners use success criteria or rubrics independently (practice 9)
      • Responding to feedback is embedded in planning (practice 10)
    • 2h) Meaningful self- and peer assessment
      • The culture of teachers and assessment
      • Where self- and peer assessment fit in the classroom assessment model
      • Phases towards more learner-focused assessment
      • Purposes and benefits of self-assessment and peer assessment
      • Developing meaningful self-assessment and peer assessment
      • Analysing your practice and deciding your next steps
      • How to develop shared values in learner-led assessment (practices 1–8)
      • How to do self- or peer assessment of simple tests (practices 1 and 2)
      • How to model learner assessment with an exemplar (practice 3)
      • How to do self-assessment with more complex work with a rubric (practices 4 and 5)
      • Peer assessment of more complex work with a rubric (practices 6 and 7)
      • How to support learners giving and responding to feedback (practice 8)
    • 2i) Using summative tests, formatively
      • Where summative assessment fits in
      • Phases towards using summative tests formatively
      • Practice analyser: Towards using summative tests formatively
      • Analysing your practice and deciding your next steps
      • Test done – results given (practice 1)
      • Test results used to inform next steps for teaching (practice 2)
      • Time given to going through test answers (practice 3)
      • Test results used to inform next steps for learning (practice 4)
      • Exemplar test questions given to try before the actual test (practice 5)
      • Exemplar test questions tried and improved on before the actual test (practice 6)
      • Learners given the mark scheme after the test to attempt to self-mark (practice 7)
      • Learners create their own test questions and answers (practice 8)
  • Chapter 3 The future of assessment
    • 3a) Reflections on the classroom assessment model
    • 3b) Educational change
    • 3c) Alternative assessment
    • 3d) Making progress
  • Index
  • Back Cover
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