Memoirs of the life, exile, and conversations of the Emperor Napoleon. (Vol. IV)
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Memoirs of the life, exile, and conversations of the Emperor Napoleon. (Vol. IV)

By Emmanuel-Auguste-Dieudonné Las Cases
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Table of Contents
  • MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE, EXILE, AND CONVERSATIONS, OF THE EMPEROR NAPOLEON.
  • REMOVAL OF FOUR PERSONS OF OUR ESTABLISHMENT.--RECOLLECTIONS OF THE EMPEROR’S EARLY LIFE.
    • MADAME DE GENLIS’ NOVELS.
    • VALUATION OF THE BOOKS SENT OUT TO US.—THE GRAND MARSHAL COMES TO LIVE NEARER TO US.
    • EXPEDITION OF ST. LOUIS IN EGYPT.—OUR FEMALE AUTHORS.—MADAME DE STAEL.—THE WRITERS INIMICAL TO NAPOLEON WILL BITE AGAINST GRANITE.
    • CARE TAKEN OF THE WOUNDED IN THE ARMIES.—BARON LARREY.—CHARACTERISTIC CIRCUMSTANCE.
    • THE EMPEROR ACCEPTS MY FOUR THOUSAND LOUIS.—TRAGEDY OF EURIPIDES IN ITS ORIGINAL PURITY ORDERED FOR THE THEATRE AT SAINT-CLOUD.—MARSHAL JOURDAN.
    • SUMMARY OF JULY, AUGUST, SEPTEMBER, AND OCTOBER.—OF MR. O’MEARA’S WORK.—ACTION NOW BROUGHT AGAINST HIM BY SIR HUDSON LOWE.—A FEW WORDS IN DEFENCE OF THIS WORK.
    • NAPOLEON’S VIEWS AND INTENTIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE RUSSIAN WAR.—OFFICIAL INSTRUCTIONS.
    • INSTRUCTIONS GIVEN TO M—--, TO SERVE AS HIS GUIDE IN THE MISSION WHICH HE WILL HAVE TO FULFIL IN POLAND. (APRIL 18, 1812.)
    • THE EMPEROR INDISPOSED.—ANECDOTES OF THE INTERIOR OF THE TUILERIES.
    • THE EMPEROR CONTINUES INDISPOSED.—IMMORALITY THE WORST FAULT IN A SOVEREIGN.
    • THE EMPEROR STILL UNWELL.—WANT OF MEDICINES.—SERVAN’S GUERRES D’ITALIE.—MADAME DE MONTESSON.
    • THE EMPEROR STILL INDISPOSED.—CHARACTERISTIC CIRCUMSTANCES.
    • THE EMPEROR’S FIFTH DAY OF CONFINEMENT.—ANECDOTE OF AN UNPAID BILL.—ON UNPOPULARITY.
    • THE EMPEROR VIOLATES THE DOCTOR’S ORDERS.—THE NAME OF THE GREAT NATION FIRST APPLIED TO FRANCE BY NAPOLEON.
    • THE EMPEROR’S HEALTH DECLINES VISIBLY.—THE DOCTOR EXPRESSES ALARM.—FRENCH PRISONERS IN ENGLAND, &C.
    • NAPOLEON’S DESIGNS WITH REGARD TO ANTWERP.—HIS REFUSAL TO SURRENDER THAT CITY ONE OF THE CAUSES OF HIS FALL.—HIS GENEROUS SENTIMENTS IN REJECTING THE TREATY OF CHATILLON.—MARITIME WORKS.—OFFICIAL REPORT OF THE STATE OF THE EMPIRE IN 1813.—TOTAL AMOUNT OF EXPENDITURE IN PUBLIC WORKS, DURING THE REIGN OF NAPOLEON.
    • THE EMPEROR INDISPOSED AND MELANCHOLY.—AMUSING ANECDOTES.—TWO AIDES-DE-CAMP.—MALLET’S PLOT.
    • THE EMPERORS’S CONTINUED INDISPOSITION AND CONFINEMENT.—HE OBSERVES THAT HE OUGHT TO HAVE DIED AT MOSCOW OR WATERLOO.—EULOGIUM ON HIS FAMILY.
    • GEOGRAPHY THE PASSION OF THE MOMENT.—STATE BED ARRIVED FROM LONDON.—THE EMPEROR CALLS IT A RAT-TRAP.—ANECDOTES RELATED BY THE ENGLISH.—LETTERS FROM ST. HELENA, &C.
    • PHYSICAL ADVANTAGES OF RUSSIA.—HER POLITICAL POWER.—REMARKS ON INDIA.—PITT AND FOX.—IDEAS ON POLITICAL ECONOMY.—COMPANIES, OR FREE TRADE.—M. DE SUFFREN.—THE EMPEROR’S REMARKS ON THE NAVY.
    • NAPOLEON’S IMPERIAL SYSTEM.—PREFECTS.—AUDITORS OF THE COUNCIL OF STATE.—THE EMPEROR’S MOTIVES IN GRANTING LUCRATIVE APPOINTMENTS.—HIS FUTURE INTENTIONS.
    • LA VENDÉE.—CHARETTE.—LAMARQUE.—TRAGEDIES OF ÆSCHYLUS AND SOPHOCLES.—REAL TRAGEDIES AMONG THE ROMANS.—SENECA’S MEDEA.—SINGULAR FACT.
    • THE EMPEROR CONSIDERABLY BETTER.—INFERNAL MACHINE
    • WAR ON HIGH ROADS.—DUMOURIEZ MORE DARING THAN NAPOLEON.—PRINCESS CHARLOTTE OF WALES AND THE PRINCE OF SAXE COBOURG.
    • REMARKS ON SEVERAL IMPORTANT SUBJECTS.—NAPOLEON’S DEBUT IN DIPLOMACY.—CONCENTRATION OF THE NATIONS OF EUROPE.—CONQUEST OF SPAIN.—DANGER OF RUSSIA.—BERNADOTTE.
    • THE EMPEROR HAS BUT LITTLE CONFIDENCE IN THE ISSUE OF 1815.—THEMISTOCLES.—IN THE CRISIS OF 1814, NAPOLEON HIMSELF MOMENTARILY ENTERTAINED A THOUGHT OF RESTORING THE BOURBONS.—BARON FAIN’S MANUSCRIPT OF 1814.—THE ABDICATION OF FONTAINEBLEAU, &C.
    • TREATY OF FONTAINEBLEAU.
    • DECLARATION OF ACCESSION IN THE NAME OF LOUIS XVIII.
    • LETTER FROM LORD CASTLEREAGH TO LORD BATHURST,
    • THE SWORD OF FREDERIC THE GREAT.—ON NAPOLEON’S MARRIAGE IT WAS HOPED THAT THE LION WOULD SLUMBER.—TORMENTING CONDUCT OF THE GOVERNOR.—OUR LOT ENVIABLE, EVEN AMIDST OUR MISERY.
    • NEW WORKS PLANNED BY THE EMPEROR.—REMARKS ON GREAT COMMANDERS; WAR, &C.—NAPOLEON’S OPINION’S ON VARIOUS INSTITUTIONS.—ADVOCATES.—CURATES.—MISCELLANEOUS OBSERVATIONS.
    • ALARMING CHANGE IN THE EMPEROR.—THE GOVERNOR SURROUNDS US WITH FORTIFICATIONS.—PANIC TERRORS OF SIR HUDSON LOWE.—GENERAL LAMARQUE.—MADAME RECAMIER AND A PRUSSIAN PRINCE.
    • PORTRAITS OF THE PRESENT ENGLISH MINISTERS.—THE EMPEROR CONDEMNS ALL MINISTRIES.—HONOURABLE EXCEPTIONS.—NAPOLEON’S SENTIMENTS FOR THE INDIVIDUALS WHO SERVED HIM.
    • THE GENERALS OF THE ARMY OF ITALY.—NAPOLEON THE ADOPTED FATHER OF ONE OF HIS AIDES-DE-CAMP.—SCANDALOUS NOVEL.—NAPOLEON’S DISLIKE OF GAMING.—THE LA ROCHEFOUCAULT FAMILY, &c.
    • PONIATOWSKI THE REAL KING OF POLAND.—CHARACTERISTIC ANECDOTES OF NAPOLEON.
    • ON THE DIFFICULTIES WHICH HISTORY PRESENTS.—GEORGES, PICHEGRU, MOREAU, THE DUKE D’ENGHIEN.
    • THE SERVANT WHO HAD BEEN TAKEN AWAY FROM ME PAYS ME A SECRET VISIT.—HIS OFFERS.—SECOND VISIT.—THIRD VISIT.—I INTRUST TO HIM MY LETTER TO PRINCE LUCIEN, WHICH CAUSES MY REMOVAL FROM ST. HELENA.
    • MY REMOVAL FROM LONGWOOD.—SOLITARY CONFINEMENT AT ST. HELENA (A SPACE OF ABOUT SIX WEEKS).
    • MY PAPERS ARE EXAMINED, &C.
    • MY REMOVAL TO BALCOMBE’S COTTAGE.
    • MY RESOLUTION.—MY LETTERS TO SIR HUDSON LOWE, &C.
    • MY ANXIETIES.—A LETTER FROM THE EMPEROR, A REAL BLESSING.
    • REFLECTIONS ON THE EMPEROR’S LETTER.—NEW OBSTACLES STARTED BY SIR HUDSON LOWE.
    • OFFICIAL DECISION RESPECTING MY REMOVAL TO THE CAPE.—CONDUCT OF SIR HUDSON LOWE.
    • DECLARATION.
    • LETTER FROM SIR HUDSON LOWE, WHICH ACCOMPANIED THE PRECEDING DOCUMENT.
    • CORRESPONDENCE CONTINUED.—THE GOVERNOR DISCONCERTED BY MY FINAL DETERMINATION.
    • OUR REMOVAL FROM BALCOMBE’S COTTAGE TO THE TOWN.
    • OUR RESIDENCE AT THE GOVERNOR’S CASTLE.—BETTER TREATMENT, &C.
    • THE EMPEROR’S MESSAGE TO ME.—THE GRAND MARSHAL’S FAREWELL.
    • LAST FAREWELL.—SEALING OF MY PAPERS.—DEPARTURE.
    • DECLARATION OF SIR HUDSON LOWE TO COUNT DE LAS CASES.
    • PASSAGE FROM ST. HELENA TO THE CAPE, A SPACE OF EIGHTEEN DAYS.—DETAILS, &C.
  • MY RESIDENCE AT THE CAPE.
    • MY CONFINEMENT AT THE OLD CASTLE, &C.
    • LETTER TO LORD CASTLEREAGH, INCLOSING THAT ADDRESSED TO THE PRINCE REGENT.
    • LETTER TO THE PRINCE REGENT OF ENGLAND.
    • REMOVAL TO NEWLANDS, THE GOVERNOR’S COUNTRY RESIDENCE.—DETAILS.
    • RESIDENCE AT TYGERBERG.—THE NAME OF NAPOLEON FAMILIAR IN THE DESERT.—MANUSCRIPT OF ST. HELENA, &C.
  • PASSAGE TO EUROPE.
    • WE SAIL FROM THE CAPE.—OUR PASSAGE.—WE ANCHOR IN THE DOWNS.
  • VOYAGE FROM THE THAMES TO FRANKFORT.
    • I AM NOT ALLOWED TO REMAIN IN ENGLAND.—REMOVAL TO OSTEND.—PERSECUTIONS IN BELGIUM, PRUSSIA, &C.—AGREEABLE COMPENSATIONS.—ARRIVAL AT FRANKFORT.
  • RESIDENCE IN GERMANY.
    • FROM THE TIME OF MY ARRIVAL AT FRANKFORT TO THE PERIOD OF MY RESIDENCE AT OFFENBACH.
    • LETTER TO MARIA LOUISA, WRITTEN AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE, AND FORWARDED TO EUROPE.
    • LETTER TO PRINCE METTERNICH, CONTAINING THE PRECEDING.
    • LETTER TO HIS MAJESTY THE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA.
    • LETTER OF COUNT DE LAS CASES TO LORD BATHURST.
    • PETITION TO THE PARLIAMENT OF ENGLAND.
    • TO THE EMPRESS MARIA LOUISA.
    • MADAME MERE TO THE ALLIED SOVEREIGNS AT AIX-LA-CHAPELLE.
    • NOTE ADDRESSED TO THE ALLIED SOVEREIGNS, AT THE CONGRESS OF AIX-LA-CHAPELLE, OCTOBER, 1818.
    • LETTER TO HIS MAJESTY THE EMPEROR OF AUSTRIA, ENCLOSING THE ABOVE NOTE. (ADDRESSED TO THE EMPEROR HIMSELF.)
    • LETTER TO LORD CASTLEREAGH, WITH A COPY OF THE NOTE ADDRESSED TO THE ALLIED SOVEREIGNS.
    • LETTER OF COUNT LAS CASES TO LORD LIVERPOOL.
    • LETTER FROM COUNT BERTRAND TO COUNT DE LAS CASES.
    • FIRST NOTE, WRITTEN BY THE EMPEROR, ON THE BACK OF SIR HUDSON LOWE’S LETTER, DATED 18th NOVEMBER, 1817.
    • SECOND NOTE, INSERTED IN THE MARGIN OF SIR THOMAS READE’s LETTER TO COUNT BERTRAND, DATED 25th APRIL, 1818.
    • LETTER OF COUNT BERTRAND TO HIS EMINENCE CARDINAL FESCH.[42]
    • FIRST LETTER OF THE COUNT DE LAS CASES TO GENERAL COUNT BERTRAND.[43]
    • SECOND LETTER OF COUNT DE LAS CASES TO GENERAL COUNT BERTRAND.
    • THIRD LETTER FROM COUNT DE LAS CASES TO GENERAL COUNT BERTRAND.
    • FOURTH LETTER FROM COUNT LAS CASES TO GENERAL COUNT BERTRAND.
    • FIFTH LETTER FROM COUNT LAS CASES TO GENERAL COUNT BERTRAND.
    • LETTER FROM COUNT LAS CASES TO MR. GOULBURN, ENCLOSING TO HIM THE PRECEDING.
  • FROM MY ARRIVAL AT OFFENBACH, UP TO MY RETURN TO FRANCE.
    • RESIDENCE AT OFFENBACH.—DETAIL.—ARRIVAL OF MADAME MONTHOLON IN EUROPE.—JOURNEY TO BRUSSELS.—RESIDENCE AT LIEGE, AT CHAUDE-FONTAINE, AT SOHAN, NEAR SPA, AT ANTWERP, AT MALINES.—DEATH OF NAPOLEON.—RETURN TO FRANCE.—CONCLUSION.
  • POSTSCRIPT.
  • SUPPLEMENT.
    • NAPOLEON’S RELIGIOUS NOTIONS.
    • HIS WISHES AS TO HIS BURIAL PLACE.
    • HIS ADVICE TO THOSE AROUND HIM.
    • HIS DEATH.
    • ARRANGEMENTS RESPECTING THE CORPSE, &C.
    • THE FUNERAL.
  • TESTAMENT OF NAPOLEON.
  • INDEX.
  • Footnotes
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